full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Chiara Decaroli: The high-stakes race to make quantum computers work

Unscramble the Blue Letters

So what makes these pcietlras wtorh the efrfot? In toehry, quantum computers could outstrip the computational limits of classical computers. Classical computers process data in the form of bits. Each bit can switch between two states labeled zero and one. A quantum computer uses something called a qiubt, which can sticwh between zero, one, and what’s called a superposition. While the qubit is in its superposition, it has a lot more information than one or zero. You can think of these positions as points on a sphere: the north and south poles of the sphere represent one and zero. A bit can only switch between these two poles, but when a qubit is in its superposition, it can be at any point on the sphere. We can’t locate it exactly— the moment we read it, the qubit rlevoess into a zero or a one. But even though we can’t observe the qubit in its siprosotueipn, we can manipulate it to perform particular operations while in this state.

Open Cloze

So what makes these _________ _____ the ______? In ______, quantum computers could outstrip the computational limits of classical computers. Classical computers process data in the form of bits. Each bit can switch between two states labeled zero and one. A quantum computer uses something called a _____, which can ______ between zero, one, and what’s called a superposition. While the qubit is in its superposition, it has a lot more information than one or zero. You can think of these positions as points on a sphere: the north and south poles of the sphere represent one and zero. A bit can only switch between these two poles, but when a qubit is in its superposition, it can be at any point on the sphere. We can’t locate it exactly— the moment we read it, the qubit ________ into a zero or a one. But even though we can’t observe the qubit in its _____________, we can manipulate it to perform particular operations while in this state.

Solution

  1. switch
  2. theory
  3. particles
  4. worth
  5. resolves
  6. effort
  7. qubit
  8. superposition

Original Text

So what makes these particles worth the effort? In theory, quantum computers could outstrip the computational limits of classical computers. Classical computers process data in the form of bits. Each bit can switch between two states labeled zero and one. A quantum computer uses something called a qubit, which can switch between zero, one, and what’s called a superposition. While the qubit is in its superposition, it has a lot more information than one or zero. You can think of these positions as points on a sphere: the north and south poles of the sphere represent one and zero. A bit can only switch between these two poles, but when a qubit is in its superposition, it can be at any point on the sphere. We can’t locate it exactly— the moment we read it, the qubit resolves into a zero or a one. But even though we can’t observe the qubit in its superposition, we can manipulate it to perform particular operations while in this state.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
quantum computers 6
quantum computer 5
quantum states 3
classical computers 2
classical computer 2
qubit quantum 2

Important Words

  1. bit
  2. bits
  3. called
  4. classical
  5. computational
  6. computer
  7. computers
  8. data
  9. effort
  10. form
  11. information
  12. labeled
  13. limits
  14. locate
  15. lot
  16. manipulate
  17. moment
  18. north
  19. observe
  20. operations
  21. outstrip
  22. particles
  23. perform
  24. point
  25. points
  26. poles
  27. positions
  28. process
  29. quantum
  30. qubit
  31. read
  32. represent
  33. resolves
  34. south
  35. sphere
  36. state
  37. states
  38. superposition
  39. switch
  40. theory
  41. worth