full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Maira Kalman: The illustrated woman"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

So, I was fortunate enough to be born a very dreamy child. My older sseitr was busy torturing my paretns, and they were busy torturing her. I was lucky enough to be completely ignored, which is a fabulous thing, actually, I want to tell you. So, I was able to completely daydream my way through my life. And I falilny daydreamed my way into NYU, at a very good time, in 1967, where I met a man who was trying to blow up the math building of NYU. And I was writing terrible ptreoy and knitting sweaters for him. And fsemitnis hated us, and the whole thing was wretched from biningneg to end. But I kept writing bad poetry, and he didn't blow up the math building, but he went to Cuba. But I gave him the money, because I was from reravilde so I had more money than he did. (Laughter) And that was a good thing to help, you know, the cause. But, then he came back, and things happened, and I decided I really hated my wnritig, that it was awful, awful, purple prose. And I decided that I wanted to tell — but I still wanted to tell a narrative sorty and I still wanted to tell my stories. So I decided that I would sartt to draw. How hard could that be? And so what happened was that I started just becoming an editorial illustrator through, you know, seehr whatever, sheer ignorance.

Open Cloze

So, I was fortunate enough to be born a very dreamy child. My older ______ was busy torturing my _______, and they were busy torturing her. I was lucky enough to be completely ignored, which is a fabulous thing, actually, I want to tell you. So, I was able to completely daydream my way through my life. And I _______ daydreamed my way into NYU, at a very good time, in 1967, where I met a man who was trying to blow up the math building of NYU. And I was writing terrible ______ and knitting sweaters for him. And _________ hated us, and the whole thing was wretched from _________ to end. But I kept writing bad poetry, and he didn't blow up the math building, but he went to Cuba. But I gave him the money, because I was from _________ so I had more money than he did. (Laughter) And that was a good thing to help, you know, the cause. But, then he came back, and things happened, and I decided I really hated my _______, that it was awful, awful, purple prose. And I decided that I wanted to tell — but I still wanted to tell a narrative _____ and I still wanted to tell my stories. So I decided that I would _____ to draw. How hard could that be? And so what happened was that I started just becoming an editorial illustrator through, you know, _____ whatever, sheer ignorance.

Solution

  1. finally
  2. feminists
  3. sheer
  4. poetry
  5. story
  6. beginning
  7. sister
  8. riverdale
  9. writing
  10. start
  11. parents

Original Text

So, I was fortunate enough to be born a very dreamy child. My older sister was busy torturing my parents, and they were busy torturing her. I was lucky enough to be completely ignored, which is a fabulous thing, actually, I want to tell you. So, I was able to completely daydream my way through my life. And I finally daydreamed my way into NYU, at a very good time, in 1967, where I met a man who was trying to blow up the math building of NYU. And I was writing terrible poetry and knitting sweaters for him. And feminists hated us, and the whole thing was wretched from beginning to end. But I kept writing bad poetry, and he didn't blow up the math building, but he went to Cuba. But I gave him the money, because I was from Riverdale so I had more money than he did. (Laughter) And that was a good thing to help, you know, the cause. But, then he came back, and things happened, and I decided I really hated my writing, that it was awful, awful, purple prose. And I decided that I wanted to tell — but I still wanted to tell a narrative story and I still wanted to tell my stories. So I decided that I would start to draw. How hard could that be? And so what happened was that I started just becoming an editorial illustrator through, you know, sheer whatever, sheer ignorance.

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Important Words

  1. awful
  2. bad
  3. beginning
  4. blow
  5. born
  6. building
  7. busy
  8. child
  9. completely
  10. cuba
  11. daydream
  12. daydreamed
  13. decided
  14. draw
  15. dreamy
  16. editorial
  17. fabulous
  18. feminists
  19. finally
  20. fortunate
  21. gave
  22. good
  23. happened
  24. hard
  25. hated
  26. ignorance
  27. illustrator
  28. knitting
  29. laughter
  30. life
  31. lucky
  32. man
  33. math
  34. met
  35. money
  36. narrative
  37. nyu
  38. older
  39. parents
  40. poetry
  41. prose
  42. purple
  43. riverdale
  44. sheer
  45. sister
  46. start
  47. started
  48. stories
  49. story
  50. sweaters
  51. terrible
  52. time
  53. torturing
  54. wanted
  55. wretched
  56. writing