full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Clive Loseby: The internet's accessibility problem -- and how to fix it

Unscramble the Blue Letters

So how does all this apply to a website? Well, as far as the audit goes, you can either pay somebody or you can do it yourself. And the same goes for an accessibility smtetnaet. sdaly, I don’t have time to go into the dtalies but I do want to say one thing. Make your absisilceticy statement real. What do I mean by this? Simple. I see website after website with an accessibility statement that begins with a slightly pompous tone, and it says something like, "We fully care about people with disabilities. We want to ensure that everyone is able to flluy utilize our website. It meets the following standards, blah, blah, blah." I don't actually really care what you say. If somebody can't use your website, they can't use your wetisbe. I've got an idea. Why not instead use this as a wonderful ottpupinory to reach out to disabled people? The first line of your accessibility statement could be something like, “We’re aware that there’s some problems with our website that might make the experience more difficult for vitroiss with disabilities. But if there’s anything that we can do to help you, give us a call.” There's the phone number right there. “Follow this link to send an emial.” There’s the link right there. “Or fill in the contact form.” Right there you're reaching out to them. Just by doing that, you're being inclusive. You're going the extra mile and it speaks veuloms about your ethos as a company.

Open Cloze

So how does all this apply to a website? Well, as far as the audit goes, you can either pay somebody or you can do it yourself. And the same goes for an accessibility _________. _____, I don’t have time to go into the _______ but I do want to say one thing. Make your _____________ statement real. What do I mean by this? Simple. I see website after website with an accessibility statement that begins with a slightly pompous tone, and it says something like, "We fully care about people with disabilities. We want to ensure that everyone is able to _____ utilize our website. It meets the following standards, blah, blah, blah." I don't actually really care what you say. If somebody can't use your website, they can't use your _______. I've got an idea. Why not instead use this as a wonderful ___________ to reach out to disabled people? The first line of your accessibility statement could be something like, “We’re aware that there’s some problems with our website that might make the experience more difficult for ________ with disabilities. But if there’s anything that we can do to help you, give us a call.” There's the phone number right there. “Follow this link to send an _____.” There’s the link right there. “Or fill in the contact form.” Right there you're reaching out to them. Just by doing that, you're being inclusive. You're going the extra mile and it speaks _______ about your ethos as a company.

Solution

  1. visitors
  2. website
  3. details
  4. accessibility
  5. volumes
  6. email
  7. fully
  8. statement
  9. opportunity
  10. sadly

Original Text

So how does all this apply to a website? Well, as far as the audit goes, you can either pay somebody or you can do it yourself. And the same goes for an accessibility statement. Sadly, I don’t have time to go into the details but I do want to say one thing. Make your accessibility statement real. What do I mean by this? Simple. I see website after website with an accessibility statement that begins with a slightly pompous tone, and it says something like, "We fully care about people with disabilities. We want to ensure that everyone is able to fully utilize our website. It meets the following standards, blah, blah, blah." I don't actually really care what you say. If somebody can't use your website, they can't use your website. I've got an idea. Why not instead use this as a wonderful opportunity to reach out to disabled people? The first line of your accessibility statement could be something like, “We’re aware that there’s some problems with our website that might make the experience more difficult for visitors with disabilities. But if there’s anything that we can do to help you, give us a call.” There's the phone number right there. “Follow this link to send an email.” There’s the link right there. “Or fill in the contact form.” Right there you're reaching out to them. Just by doing that, you're being inclusive. You're going the extra mile and it speaks volumes about your ethos as a company.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
accessibility statement 6
disabled people 5
upstairs seating 4
screen reader 3
basic level 3
cookie banner 2
detectable accessibility 2
accessibility failures 2
blind people 2
physical buildings 2
accessible web 2
web design 2
left hand 2
catering company 2
page navigation 2
tab key 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
detectable accessibility failures 2
accessible web design 2

Important Words

  1. accessibility
  2. apply
  3. audit
  4. aware
  5. begins
  6. blah
  7. call
  8. care
  9. company
  10. contact
  11. details
  12. difficult
  13. disabilities
  14. disabled
  15. email
  16. ensure
  17. ethos
  18. experience
  19. extra
  20. fill
  21. form
  22. fully
  23. give
  24. idea
  25. inclusive
  26. line
  27. link
  28. meets
  29. mile
  30. number
  31. opportunity
  32. pay
  33. people
  34. phone
  35. pompous
  36. problems
  37. reach
  38. reaching
  39. real
  40. sadly
  41. send
  42. simple
  43. slightly
  44. speaks
  45. standards
  46. statement
  47. time
  48. tone
  49. utilize
  50. visitors
  51. volumes
  52. website
  53. wonderful