full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Elon Musk: The mind behind Tesla, SpaceX, SolarCity ..."

Unscramble the Blue Letters

EM: Right. There's two elements to that answer. One is that, even if you take the same source fuel and produce power at the power plant and use it to charge electric cars, you're still better off. So if you take, say, natural gas, which is the most plarevnet hbrdoayrocn source fuel, if you burn that in a mreodn garenel Electric natural gas turbine, you'll get about 60 percent efficiency. If you put that same fuel in an internal combustion eginne car, you get about 20 percent efficiency. And the reason is, in the stationary power plant, you can afford to have something that weighs a lot more, is voluminous, and you can take the waste heat and run a steam turbine and generate a secondary power source. So in effect, even after you've taken transmission loss into aocunct and everything, even using the same source fuel, you're at least twice as better off ciahgnrg an electric car, then burning it at the pwoer plant.

Open Cloze

EM: Right. There's two elements to that answer. One is that, even if you take the same source fuel and produce power at the power plant and use it to charge electric cars, you're still better off. So if you take, say, natural gas, which is the most _________ ___________ source fuel, if you burn that in a ______ _______ Electric natural gas turbine, you'll get about 60 percent efficiency. If you put that same fuel in an internal combustion ______ car, you get about 20 percent efficiency. And the reason is, in the stationary power plant, you can afford to have something that weighs a lot more, is voluminous, and you can take the waste heat and run a steam turbine and generate a secondary power source. So in effect, even after you've taken transmission loss into _______ and everything, even using the same source fuel, you're at least twice as better off ________ an electric car, then burning it at the _____ plant.

Solution

  1. general
  2. charging
  3. prevalent
  4. account
  5. hydrocarbon
  6. modern
  7. engine
  8. power

Original Text

EM: Right. There's two elements to that answer. One is that, even if you take the same source fuel and produce power at the power plant and use it to charge electric cars, you're still better off. So if you take, say, natural gas, which is the most prevalent hydrocarbon source fuel, if you burn that in a modern General Electric natural gas turbine, you'll get about 60 percent efficiency. If you put that same fuel in an internal combustion engine car, you get about 20 percent efficiency. And the reason is, in the stationary power plant, you can afford to have something that weighs a lot more, is voluminous, and you can take the waste heat and run a steam turbine and generate a secondary power source. So in effect, even after you've taken transmission loss into account and everything, even using the same source fuel, you're at least twice as better off charging an electric car, then burning it at the power plant.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
natural gas 6
electric car 5
em yeah 4
space faring 4
faring civilization 4
source fuel 3
power plant 3
laughter em 3
space shuttle 3

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
space faring civilization 4

Important Words

  1. account
  2. afford
  3. answer
  4. burn
  5. burning
  6. car
  7. cars
  8. charge
  9. charging
  10. combustion
  11. effect
  12. efficiency
  13. electric
  14. elements
  15. engine
  16. fuel
  17. gas
  18. general
  19. generate
  20. heat
  21. hydrocarbon
  22. internal
  23. loss
  24. lot
  25. modern
  26. natural
  27. percent
  28. plant
  29. power
  30. prevalent
  31. produce
  32. put
  33. reason
  34. run
  35. secondary
  36. source
  37. stationary
  38. steam
  39. transmission
  40. turbine
  41. voluminous
  42. waste
  43. weighs