full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Susan Ruffo: The ocean's ingenious climate solutions

Unscramble the Blue Letters

But how do we more ailcevty engage the ocean in our cmailte strategies? What can we do to really use the ocean to help us reduce emissions and to adapt to the impacts of climate change? What does that practically look like? Well, we know that castoal ocean emtsoecyss like mangroevs or seagrasses or salt marshes are some of the most effective carbon sinks on the pnelat. Acre for acre, they can absorb 10 times more carbon than a forest on land. And that carbon is very deep in the soils so that it can stay there for thousands of years if we lavee it unureitdsbd. The problem is that we’re not leaving it undisturbed; we are destroying these places. We’ve lost 20 to 50 pecenrt of them already, and we lose more every year. And all of that is catnreig emissions. But if we protect those places, then those emissions stop. Just like if you shut off a coal-fired power pnlat. And if we restore those places, then we can actually absorb even more carbon. But the pweor of the ocean isn't limited just to reducing emissions. The ocean can also help us to adapt to the impacts of climate change we already feel and that we know will be here with us for daedecs. Those same mangroves can actually protect coastal communities by bnirffeug them against more intense coastal storms and slowing wind and waves. Another example, oysters. In New York City, they're using oysters to help reduce the risk of mjaor floods and flood damage like they saw during Superstorm Sandy in 2012. The idea is that these reefs form dense places that force water through nooks and crannies that slow it down. So by the time it hits the shore, it actually has less power and therefore can do less damage. And at the same time, they're creating aquatic parks and places where people can gahetr and be with nature. Because the truth is that in this new climate rlitaey that we've created, we will have to learn how to live with water and with the ocean in new ways. And so what better ways to do that than with the crtuereas that actually have evolved to live in these land and sea interfaces?

Open Cloze

But how do we more ________ engage the ocean in our _______ strategies? What can we do to really use the ocean to help us reduce emissions and to adapt to the impacts of climate change? What does that practically look like? Well, we know that _______ ocean __________ like _________ or seagrasses or salt marshes are some of the most effective carbon sinks on the ______. Acre for acre, they can absorb 10 times more carbon than a forest on land. And that carbon is very deep in the soils so that it can stay there for thousands of years if we _____ it ___________. The problem is that we’re not leaving it undisturbed; we are destroying these places. We’ve lost 20 to 50 _______ of them already, and we lose more every year. And all of that is ________ emissions. But if we protect those places, then those emissions stop. Just like if you shut off a coal-fired power _____. And if we restore those places, then we can actually absorb even more carbon. But the _____ of the ocean isn't limited just to reducing emissions. The ocean can also help us to adapt to the impacts of climate change we already feel and that we know will be here with us for _______. Those same mangroves can actually protect coastal communities by _________ them against more intense coastal storms and slowing wind and waves. Another example, oysters. In New York City, they're using oysters to help reduce the risk of _____ floods and flood damage like they saw during Superstorm Sandy in 2012. The idea is that these reefs form dense places that force water through nooks and crannies that slow it down. So by the time it hits the shore, it actually has less power and therefore can do less damage. And at the same time, they're creating aquatic parks and places where people can ______ and be with nature. Because the truth is that in this new climate _______ that we've created, we will have to learn how to live with water and with the ocean in new ways. And so what better ways to do that than with the _________ that actually have evolved to live in these land and sea interfaces?

Solution

  1. major
  2. creatures
  3. plant
  4. power
  5. percent
  6. ecosystems
  7. decades
  8. actively
  9. buffering
  10. creating
  11. undisturbed
  12. mangroves
  13. reality
  14. leave
  15. planet
  16. climate
  17. gather
  18. coastal

Original Text

But how do we more actively engage the ocean in our climate strategies? What can we do to really use the ocean to help us reduce emissions and to adapt to the impacts of climate change? What does that practically look like? Well, we know that coastal ocean ecosystems like mangroves or seagrasses or salt marshes are some of the most effective carbon sinks on the planet. Acre for acre, they can absorb 10 times more carbon than a forest on land. And that carbon is very deep in the soils so that it can stay there for thousands of years if we leave it undisturbed. The problem is that we’re not leaving it undisturbed; we are destroying these places. We’ve lost 20 to 50 percent of them already, and we lose more every year. And all of that is creating emissions. But if we protect those places, then those emissions stop. Just like if you shut off a coal-fired power plant. And if we restore those places, then we can actually absorb even more carbon. But the power of the ocean isn't limited just to reducing emissions. The ocean can also help us to adapt to the impacts of climate change we already feel and that we know will be here with us for decades. Those same mangroves can actually protect coastal communities by buffering them against more intense coastal storms and slowing wind and waves. Another example, oysters. In New York City, they're using oysters to help reduce the risk of major floods and flood damage like they saw during Superstorm Sandy in 2012. The idea is that these reefs form dense places that force water through nooks and crannies that slow it down. So by the time it hits the shore, it actually has less power and therefore can do less damage. And at the same time, they're creating aquatic parks and places where people can gather and be with nature. Because the truth is that in this new climate reality that we've created, we will have to learn how to live with water and with the ocean in new ways. And so what better ways to do that than with the creatures that actually have evolved to live in these land and sea interfaces?

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
climate change 3
core part 3
climate reality 3
regulates temperature 2
reduce emissions 2
coastal communities 2
sequester carbon 2
easy solutions 2
hard work 2

Important Words

  1. absorb
  2. acre
  3. actively
  4. adapt
  5. aquatic
  6. buffering
  7. carbon
  8. change
  9. city
  10. climate
  11. coastal
  12. communities
  13. crannies
  14. created
  15. creating
  16. creatures
  17. damage
  18. decades
  19. deep
  20. dense
  21. destroying
  22. ecosystems
  23. effective
  24. emissions
  25. engage
  26. evolved
  27. feel
  28. flood
  29. floods
  30. force
  31. forest
  32. form
  33. gather
  34. hits
  35. idea
  36. impacts
  37. intense
  38. interfaces
  39. land
  40. learn
  41. leave
  42. leaving
  43. limited
  44. live
  45. lose
  46. lost
  47. major
  48. mangroves
  49. marshes
  50. nature
  51. nooks
  52. ocean
  53. oysters
  54. parks
  55. people
  56. percent
  57. places
  58. planet
  59. plant
  60. power
  61. practically
  62. problem
  63. protect
  64. reality
  65. reduce
  66. reducing
  67. reefs
  68. restore
  69. risk
  70. salt
  71. sandy
  72. sea
  73. seagrasses
  74. shore
  75. shut
  76. sinks
  77. slow
  78. slowing
  79. soils
  80. stay
  81. stop
  82. storms
  83. strategies
  84. superstorm
  85. thousands
  86. time
  87. times
  88. truth
  89. undisturbed
  90. water
  91. waves
  92. ways
  93. wind
  94. year
  95. years
  96. york