full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Marta Peirano: The surveillance device you carry around all day

Unscramble the Blue Letters

We make three mistakes: the first is underestimating the quantity of information that we produce every day; the second is dterainepcig the value of that information; and the third is thinking that our principal porblem is a distant and speur powerful aencgy that is called NSA. And it is true that NSA has the major access, better resources, the best tools, but they don't need any of that to spy on us, because we have everything there; we live in glass hsueos. This is Malte Spitz, a member of the German Green Party. In 2009, Malte asked his telephone company to send him all the data they had on him. And the Deutsche Telekom, which was his company, told him no. Two lawsuits later, they sent him a CD with an Excel table of 30,832 lines; like "The War and the Peace", but three times lergar. This endless document contains information from September of 2009 to February of 2010; it has exactly six months. This isn't accidental, it has six months because in the summer of 2008 the European unoin presented the Data Retention Directive, where they demanded each telephone company with more than 10,000 clitnes keep the data of all their clients for a miiunmm of six months and a maximum of two years. They gave mtlae data of 6 months, as if saying, "This is everything we have because the law forces us." They probably owe him a year and half. Malte, who couldn't process this amount of information, sent it to a weekly magazine which, in turn, contacted a data visualization agency to do something with it. They took the data from descuhte Telekom and Malte's public irofioatmnn, like, for example, information from his Twitter aoccnut or his blog. And with this they created the map that you are looking at now, that is more than a map, it is more like a creepy automatic diary of Malte's life. We can see when he cehtcas a train, which he's doing right now, when he stops, where he stays, when he goes, how he goes, how much time it tekas him, when he is eating, when he is sleeping, like right now; when he takes a figlht, who calls him, how long they speak, who sends him messages, what are the messages. We see everything. This is on the Internet. You can see it. The raeson why this happens is because Malte has a mobile in his pocket that every five minutes makes a "ping" to the closest antenna and tlels it, "Do you have something for me? Do I have mail? Do I have any wsptahap messages? Has something happened in the world?" Raise your hand if you have a mobile in your pocket that does the same. Every five minutes our mobiles are saying, "I'm here, I'm here, now I'm here, hey, I'm here..." That's what happens. And this doesn't have precedents. We didn't have this before. The direct eqanlvueit of that is what we have now on the screen. This is the profile of a psoren watched by the Stasi for yeras. Looks like a napkin, doesn't it? With 46 posts including his aunt, the milkman, the priest of his church — These are five minutes in the life of Malte Spitz, and this information is automatic. And the worst thing is that this is only the data on Malte, but Malte is sernruuodd by people like us with mobiles like his that are producing the same information; and that company sees everything. This is a photo made by my colleague Juanlu Sánchez, a photo from manifestation 15-M. But let's look at it from a telecommunications' venwpioit. This square is full with mobiles. Using those mobiles we can know exactly who is at the square, almost as if we put a cordon around; with names and senmuars. And not only we know when they have come, where they come from and with whom, whom they leave with, whom they call to; we know everything about them. We even know if they are on the 4th floor or down at the square. This is how that photo is seen by an algorithm of traffic analysis. And here we begin to see some cool stuff. We see that not all the people at the square are the same. There are people more important than others, and if we have control over these telecommunications, this network, we can do things, like tunnirg off the nodes on this srquae, in other words, iltsoae those who gather others around them from the rest. Also we can do what the Ukrainian government did about a year and half ago: send out a message saying, "Dear user, you've been reetrisegd as a pcpiatanrit in a massive illegal manifestation." We don't behave the same when we know that we are watched. Since Jeremy batnehm we know that the best way to watch a population is for them not to know when they are watched and when not. In Malte's case, during those 6 months, they were whainctg him for 78 percent of the time. And we're only talking about our mobiles. We are not tnkalig about our ctomeuprs, nor the craemas that are on the streets, in the stores and shop-windows, in the airports and trains, and wherever we are, being watched. We are not talking about the radars on the roads that register us if we overspeed. We are not talking about what we have in a wallet. How many personal identification chips do we have in a wallet? We have a lot: an ID card, a driving license or a transport ticket, ceridt or debit cdras, reward cards. A supermarket reward card. 20 years ago, the biggest peoansrl data base in the world was not owned by NSA, neither by the sstai, poor thing. It was owned by Wal-Mart, the aaeicmrn supermarket chian. Why? Because when they give you a raewrd card, what you're doing is telling a company who you are, where you live, how much you earn, what you buy, what you eat, how many kids you have, when you go on vacations, when you get sick. And all this we give them hoping that in six mnoths or in a year, if we spend a lot of money, they'll give us a Tupperware. (Laughter) And it's not different from what we do on the Internet, because Deutsche toelekm is a lgeit erepoaun company that has to obey the Data Protection Law, the same way as Telef贸nica. Telef贸nica, here, has to obey the data poiotcrten laws, but it's not the same with the companies that make mobiles, oatveripe systems, offer us "free" mlais, give those apps that we download and ask us for access to a bunch of strange things, and we say, "They might need it for something." They need it to sell it. Why would anrgy Birds want to have access to your GPS? To make money! Our observers don't care if we are nobody, if we are unimportant, because they're algorithms, not people. And our profiles are automatic; they eixst even if nobody looks at it. And the day somebody looks at it and changes your fate, your profile, your history, becomes your roercd. You can end up being stuck at the airport in one of the 75 countries where being homosexual is illegal. Or you could end up in a country where taking a picture of a pharmacy of mass production from the other side of the steret is terrorism; this happens in the United States. Or you could end up in Syria, where people are shot on the streets; activists, especially jsnulrotias. You could end up in Mexico, D.F., where the Zetas use their aseccs to the information of phnoe companies to see who contacts the pcolie and cut their heads. There are tdoashnus of ways to be in the worng place at the wrong time, and sometimes you don't even have to move. In Holland they had a census. It was a census that included rgioniels with high devotion rates in the world. They wanted to know how many Protestants, Catholics, Jews they had to know how much money they had to put in each community, in each church or synagogue. What happened? When the Nazis came, they had their homework done. Only 10 percent of the Dutch Jews survived in the Second wrold War. If that database hadn't exist, the figures would've been very different. What I mean is that our problem isn't the NSA, neither our corrupt governments, neither ambitious companies that want to sell our data, neither bad people, and it has nothing to do with their inontietns, nor with their bad intentions. The problem is that the very existence of that information makes us vulnerable in the ways that we can't anticipate right now. We have to put curtains in our houses; we can't expect that somebody will do it for us. We have to put them now. We have to start using cryptography in our mobiles, in our communications, in our computers. Start thinking twice every time someone offers us a reward card, and say, "Mmm..." Not only for us, because besides everything, this state of surveillance is one of the worst sicknesses that a democracy has. So, I invite you, upon your arrival back home, strat using Tor, and if someone wants to see what you are doing, he should ask for a seacrh warrant. Thank you very much. (Applause)

Open Cloze

We make three mistakes: the first is underestimating the quantity of information that we produce every day; the second is ____________ the value of that information; and the third is thinking that our principal _______ is a distant and _____ powerful ______ that is called NSA. And it is true that NSA has the major access, better resources, the best tools, but they don't need any of that to spy on us, because we have everything there; we live in glass ______. This is Malte Spitz, a member of the German Green Party. In 2009, Malte asked his telephone company to send him all the data they had on him. And the Deutsche Telekom, which was his company, told him no. Two lawsuits later, they sent him a CD with an Excel table of 30,832 lines; like "The War and the Peace", but three times ______. This endless document contains information from September of 2009 to February of 2010; it has exactly six months. This isn't accidental, it has six months because in the summer of 2008 the European _____ presented the Data Retention Directive, where they demanded each telephone company with more than 10,000 _______ keep the data of all their clients for a _______ of six months and a maximum of two years. They gave _____ data of 6 months, as if saying, "This is everything we have because the law forces us." They probably owe him a year and half. Malte, who couldn't process this amount of information, sent it to a weekly magazine which, in turn, contacted a data visualization agency to do something with it. They took the data from ________ Telekom and Malte's public ___________, like, for example, information from his Twitter _______ or his blog. And with this they created the map that you are looking at now, that is more than a map, it is more like a creepy automatic diary of Malte's life. We can see when he _______ a train, which he's doing right now, when he stops, where he stays, when he goes, how he goes, how much time it _____ him, when he is eating, when he is sleeping, like right now; when he takes a ______, who calls him, how long they speak, who sends him messages, what are the messages. We see everything. This is on the Internet. You can see it. The ______ why this happens is because Malte has a mobile in his pocket that every five minutes makes a "ping" to the closest antenna and _____ it, "Do you have something for me? Do I have mail? Do I have any ________ messages? Has something happened in the world?" Raise your hand if you have a mobile in your pocket that does the same. Every five minutes our mobiles are saying, "I'm here, I'm here, now I'm here, hey, I'm here..." That's what happens. And this doesn't have precedents. We didn't have this before. The direct __________ of that is what we have now on the screen. This is the profile of a ______ watched by the Stasi for _____. Looks like a napkin, doesn't it? With 46 posts including his aunt, the milkman, the priest of his church — These are five minutes in the life of Malte Spitz, and this information is automatic. And the worst thing is that this is only the data on Malte, but Malte is __________ by people like us with mobiles like his that are producing the same information; and that company sees everything. This is a photo made by my colleague Juanlu Sánchez, a photo from manifestation 15-M. But let's look at it from a telecommunications' _________. This square is full with mobiles. Using those mobiles we can know exactly who is at the square, almost as if we put a cordon around; with names and ________. And not only we know when they have come, where they come from and with whom, whom they leave with, whom they call to; we know everything about them. We even know if they are on the 4th floor or down at the square. This is how that photo is seen by an algorithm of traffic analysis. And here we begin to see some cool stuff. We see that not all the people at the square are the same. There are people more important than others, and if we have control over these telecommunications, this network, we can do things, like _______ off the nodes on this ______, in other words, _______ those who gather others around them from the rest. Also we can do what the Ukrainian government did about a year and half ago: send out a message saying, "Dear user, you've been __________ as a ___________ in a massive illegal manifestation." We don't behave the same when we know that we are watched. Since Jeremy _______ we know that the best way to watch a population is for them not to know when they are watched and when not. In Malte's case, during those 6 months, they were ________ him for 78 percent of the time. And we're only talking about our mobiles. We are not _______ about our _________, nor the _______ that are on the streets, in the stores and shop-windows, in the airports and trains, and wherever we are, being watched. We are not talking about the radars on the roads that register us if we overspeed. We are not talking about what we have in a wallet. How many personal identification chips do we have in a wallet? We have a lot: an ID card, a driving license or a transport ticket, ______ or debit _____, reward cards. A supermarket reward card. 20 years ago, the biggest ________ data base in the world was not owned by NSA, neither by the _____, poor thing. It was owned by Wal-Mart, the ________ supermarket _____. Why? Because when they give you a ______ card, what you're doing is telling a company who you are, where you live, how much you earn, what you buy, what you eat, how many kids you have, when you go on vacations, when you get sick. And all this we give them hoping that in six ______ or in a year, if we spend a lot of money, they'll give us a Tupperware. (Laughter) And it's not different from what we do on the Internet, because Deutsche _______ is a _____ ________ company that has to obey the Data Protection Law, the same way as Telef贸nica. Telef贸nica, here, has to obey the data __________ laws, but it's not the same with the companies that make mobiles, _________ systems, offer us "free" _____, give those apps that we download and ask us for access to a bunch of strange things, and we say, "They might need it for something." They need it to sell it. Why would _____ Birds want to have access to your GPS? To make money! Our observers don't care if we are nobody, if we are unimportant, because they're algorithms, not people. And our profiles are automatic; they _____ even if nobody looks at it. And the day somebody looks at it and changes your fate, your profile, your history, becomes your ______. You can end up being stuck at the airport in one of the 75 countries where being homosexual is illegal. Or you could end up in a country where taking a picture of a pharmacy of mass production from the other side of the ______ is terrorism; this happens in the United States. Or you could end up in Syria, where people are shot on the streets; activists, especially ___________. You could end up in Mexico, D.F., where the Zetas use their ______ to the information of _____ companies to see who contacts the ______ and cut their heads. There are _________ of ways to be in the _____ place at the wrong time, and sometimes you don't even have to move. In Holland they had a census. It was a census that included _________ with high devotion rates in the world. They wanted to know how many Protestants, Catholics, Jews they had to know how much money they had to put in each community, in each church or synagogue. What happened? When the Nazis came, they had their homework done. Only 10 percent of the Dutch Jews survived in the Second _____ War. If that database hadn't exist, the figures would've been very different. What I mean is that our problem isn't the NSA, neither our corrupt governments, neither ambitious companies that want to sell our data, neither bad people, and it has nothing to do with their __________, nor with their bad intentions. The problem is that the very existence of that information makes us vulnerable in the ways that we can't anticipate right now. We have to put curtains in our houses; we can't expect that somebody will do it for us. We have to put them now. We have to start using cryptography in our mobiles, in our communications, in our computers. Start thinking twice every time someone offers us a reward card, and say, "Mmm..." Not only for us, because besides everything, this state of surveillance is one of the worst sicknesses that a democracy has. So, I invite you, upon your arrival back home, _____ using Tor, and if someone wants to see what you are doing, he should ask for a ______ warrant. Thank you very much. (Applause)

Solution

  1. takes
  2. journalists
  3. start
  4. credit
  5. phone
  6. square
  7. tells
  8. years
  9. police
  10. registered
  11. thousands
  12. intentions
  13. catches
  14. turning
  15. houses
  16. cameras
  17. minimum
  18. surnames
  19. reason
  20. stasi
  21. viewpoint
  22. record
  23. problem
  24. religions
  25. participant
  26. union
  27. surrounded
  28. access
  29. super
  30. search
  31. deutsche
  32. bentham
  33. telekom
  34. malte
  35. isolate
  36. american
  37. equivalent
  38. world
  39. chain
  40. person
  41. legit
  42. operative
  43. account
  44. reward
  45. street
  46. clients
  47. months
  48. european
  49. whatsapp
  50. exist
  51. angry
  52. mails
  53. flight
  54. agency
  55. talking
  56. wrong
  57. larger
  58. personal
  59. depreciating
  60. protection
  61. computers
  62. watching
  63. information
  64. cards

Original Text

We make three mistakes: the first is underestimating the quantity of information that we produce every day; the second is depreciating the value of that information; and the third is thinking that our principal problem is a distant and super powerful agency that is called NSA. And it is true that NSA has the major access, better resources, the best tools, but they don't need any of that to spy on us, because we have everything there; we live in glass houses. This is Malte Spitz, a member of the German Green Party. In 2009, Malte asked his telephone company to send him all the data they had on him. And the Deutsche Telekom, which was his company, told him no. Two lawsuits later, they sent him a CD with an Excel table of 30,832 lines; like "The War and the Peace", but three times larger. This endless document contains information from September of 2009 to February of 2010; it has exactly six months. This isn't accidental, it has six months because in the summer of 2008 the European Union presented the Data Retention Directive, where they demanded each telephone company with more than 10,000 clients keep the data of all their clients for a minimum of six months and a maximum of two years. They gave Malte data of 6 months, as if saying, "This is everything we have because the law forces us." They probably owe him a year and half. Malte, who couldn't process this amount of information, sent it to a weekly magazine which, in turn, contacted a data visualization agency to do something with it. They took the data from Deutsche Telekom and Malte's public information, like, for example, information from his Twitter account or his blog. And with this they created the map that you are looking at now, that is more than a map, it is more like a creepy automatic diary of Malte's life. We can see when he catches a train, which he's doing right now, when he stops, where he stays, when he goes, how he goes, how much time it takes him, when he is eating, when he is sleeping, like right now; when he takes a flight, who calls him, how long they speak, who sends him messages, what are the messages. We see everything. This is on the Internet. You can see it. The reason why this happens is because Malte has a mobile in his pocket that every five minutes makes a "ping" to the closest antenna and tells it, "Do you have something for me? Do I have mail? Do I have any WhatsApp messages? Has something happened in the world?" Raise your hand if you have a mobile in your pocket that does the same. Every five minutes our mobiles are saying, "I'm here, I'm here, now I'm here, hey, I'm here..." That's what happens. And this doesn't have precedents. We didn't have this before. The direct equivalent of that is what we have now on the screen. This is the profile of a person watched by the Stasi for years. Looks like a napkin, doesn't it? With 46 posts including his aunt, the milkman, the priest of his church — These are five minutes in the life of Malte Spitz, and this information is automatic. And the worst thing is that this is only the data on Malte, but Malte is surrounded by people like us with mobiles like his that are producing the same information; and that company sees everything. This is a photo made by my colleague Juanlu Sánchez, a photo from manifestation 15-M. But let's look at it from a telecommunications' viewpoint. This square is full with mobiles. Using those mobiles we can know exactly who is at the square, almost as if we put a cordon around; with names and surnames. And not only we know when they have come, where they come from and with whom, whom they leave with, whom they call to; we know everything about them. We even know if they are on the 4th floor or down at the square. This is how that photo is seen by an algorithm of traffic analysis. And here we begin to see some cool stuff. We see that not all the people at the square are the same. There are people more important than others, and if we have control over these telecommunications, this network, we can do things, like turning off the nodes on this square, in other words, isolate those who gather others around them from the rest. Also we can do what the Ukrainian government did about a year and half ago: send out a message saying, "Dear user, you've been registered as a participant in a massive illegal manifestation." We don't behave the same when we know that we are watched. Since Jeremy Bentham we know that the best way to watch a population is for them not to know when they are watched and when not. In Malte's case, during those 6 months, they were watching him for 78 percent of the time. And we're only talking about our mobiles. We are not talking about our computers, nor the cameras that are on the streets, in the stores and shop-windows, in the airports and trains, and wherever we are, being watched. We are not talking about the radars on the roads that register us if we overspeed. We are not talking about what we have in a wallet. How many personal identification chips do we have in a wallet? We have a lot: an ID card, a driving license or a transport ticket, credit or debit cards, reward cards. A supermarket reward card. 20 years ago, the biggest personal data base in the world was not owned by NSA, neither by the Stasi, poor thing. It was owned by Wal-Mart, the American supermarket chain. Why? Because when they give you a reward card, what you're doing is telling a company who you are, where you live, how much you earn, what you buy, what you eat, how many kids you have, when you go on vacations, when you get sick. And all this we give them hoping that in six months or in a year, if we spend a lot of money, they'll give us a Tupperware. (Laughter) And it's not different from what we do on the Internet, because Deutsche Telekom is a legit European company that has to obey the Data Protection Law, the same way as Telef贸nica. Telef贸nica, here, has to obey the data protection laws, but it's not the same with the companies that make mobiles, operative systems, offer us "free" mails, give those apps that we download and ask us for access to a bunch of strange things, and we say, "They might need it for something." They need it to sell it. Why would Angry Birds want to have access to your GPS? To make money! Our observers don't care if we are nobody, if we are unimportant, because they're algorithms, not people. And our profiles are automatic; they exist even if nobody looks at it. And the day somebody looks at it and changes your fate, your profile, your history, becomes your record. You can end up being stuck at the airport in one of the 75 countries where being homosexual is illegal. Or you could end up in a country where taking a picture of a pharmacy of mass production from the other side of the street is terrorism; this happens in the United States. Or you could end up in Syria, where people are shot on the streets; activists, especially journalists. You could end up in Mexico, D.F., where the Zetas use their access to the information of phone companies to see who contacts the police and cut their heads. There are thousands of ways to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, and sometimes you don't even have to move. In Holland they had a census. It was a census that included religions with high devotion rates in the world. They wanted to know how many Protestants, Catholics, Jews they had to know how much money they had to put in each community, in each church or synagogue. What happened? When the Nazis came, they had their homework done. Only 10 percent of the Dutch Jews survived in the Second World War. If that database hadn't exist, the figures would've been very different. What I mean is that our problem isn't the NSA, neither our corrupt governments, neither ambitious companies that want to sell our data, neither bad people, and it has nothing to do with their intentions, nor with their bad intentions. The problem is that the very existence of that information makes us vulnerable in the ways that we can't anticipate right now. We have to put curtains in our houses; we can't expect that somebody will do it for us. We have to put them now. We have to start using cryptography in our mobiles, in our communications, in our computers. Start thinking twice every time someone offers us a reward card, and say, "Mmm..." Not only for us, because besides everything, this state of surveillance is one of the worst sicknesses that a democracy has. So, I invite you, upon your arrival back home, start using Tor, and if someone wants to see what you are doing, he should ask for a search warrant. Thank you very much. (Applause)

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
telephone company 2
deutsche telekom 2
data protection 2

Important Words

  1. access
  2. accidental
  3. account
  4. activists
  5. agency
  6. airport
  7. airports
  8. algorithm
  9. algorithms
  10. ambitious
  11. american
  12. amount
  13. analysis
  14. angry
  15. antenna
  16. anticipate
  17. applause
  18. apps
  19. arrival
  20. asked
  21. aunt
  22. automatic
  23. bad
  24. base
  25. behave
  26. bentham
  27. biggest
  28. birds
  29. blog
  30. bunch
  31. buy
  32. call
  33. called
  34. calls
  35. cameras
  36. card
  37. cards
  38. care
  39. case
  40. catches
  41. catholics
  42. cd
  43. census
  44. chain
  45. chips
  46. church
  47. clients
  48. closest
  49. colleague
  50. communications
  51. community
  52. companies
  53. company
  54. computers
  55. contacted
  56. contacts
  57. control
  58. cool
  59. cordon
  60. corrupt
  61. countries
  62. country
  63. created
  64. credit
  65. creepy
  66. cryptography
  67. curtains
  68. cut
  69. data
  70. database
  71. day
  72. debit
  73. demanded
  74. democracy
  75. depreciating
  76. deutsche
  77. devotion
  78. diary
  79. direct
  80. directive
  81. distant
  82. document
  83. download
  84. driving
  85. dutch
  86. earn
  87. eat
  88. eating
  89. endless
  90. equivalent
  91. european
  92. excel
  93. exist
  94. existence
  95. expect
  96. fate
  97. february
  98. figures
  99. flight
  100. floor
  101. forces
  102. full
  103. gather
  104. gave
  105. german
  106. give
  107. glass
  108. government
  109. governments
  110. gps
  111. green
  112. hand
  113. happened
  114. heads
  115. hey
  116. high
  117. history
  118. holland
  119. home
  120. homework
  121. homosexual
  122. hoping
  123. houses
  124. id
  125. identification
  126. illegal
  127. important
  128. included
  129. including
  130. information
  131. intentions
  132. internet
  133. invite
  134. isolate
  135. jeremy
  136. jews
  137. journalists
  138. juanlu
  139. kids
  140. larger
  141. laughter
  142. law
  143. laws
  144. lawsuits
  145. leave
  146. legit
  147. license
  148. life
  149. live
  150. long
  151. lot
  152. magazine
  153. mail
  154. mails
  155. major
  156. malte
  157. manifestation
  158. map
  159. mass
  160. massive
  161. maximum
  162. member
  163. message
  164. messages
  165. mexico
  166. milkman
  167. minimum
  168. minutes
  169. mobile
  170. mobiles
  171. money
  172. months
  173. move
  174. names
  175. napkin
  176. nazis
  177. network
  178. nodes
  179. nsa
  180. obey
  181. observers
  182. offer
  183. offers
  184. operative
  185. overspeed
  186. owe
  187. owned
  188. participant
  189. party
  190. people
  191. percent
  192. person
  193. personal
  194. pharmacy
  195. phone
  196. photo
  197. picture
  198. place
  199. pocket
  200. police
  201. poor
  202. population
  203. posts
  204. powerful
  205. precedents
  206. presented
  207. priest
  208. principal
  209. problem
  210. process
  211. produce
  212. producing
  213. production
  214. profile
  215. profiles
  216. protection
  217. protestants
  218. public
  219. put
  220. quantity
  221. radars
  222. raise
  223. rates
  224. reason
  225. record
  226. register
  227. registered
  228. religions
  229. resources
  230. rest
  231. retention
  232. reward
  233. roads
  234. screen
  235. search
  236. sees
  237. sell
  238. send
  239. sends
  240. september
  241. shot
  242. sick
  243. sicknesses
  244. side
  245. sleeping
  246. speak
  247. spend
  248. spitz
  249. spy
  250. square
  251. start
  252. stasi
  253. state
  254. states
  255. stays
  256. stops
  257. stores
  258. strange
  259. street
  260. streets
  261. stuck
  262. stuff
  263. summer
  264. super
  265. supermarket
  266. surnames
  267. surrounded
  268. surveillance
  269. survived
  270. synagogue
  271. syria
  272. systems
  273. table
  274. takes
  275. talking
  276. telecommunications
  277. telekom
  278. telephone
  279. telling
  280. tells
  281. thinking
  282. thousands
  283. ticket
  284. time
  285. times
  286. told
  287. tools
  288. tor
  289. traffic
  290. train
  291. trains
  292. transport
  293. true
  294. tupperware
  295. turn
  296. turning
  297. twitter
  298. ukrainian
  299. underestimating
  300. unimportant
  301. union
  302. united
  303. user
  304. vacations
  305. viewpoint
  306. visualization
  307. vulnerable
  308. wallet
  309. wanted
  310. war
  311. warrant
  312. watch
  313. watched
  314. watching
  315. ways
  316. weekly
  317. whatsapp
  318. words
  319. world
  320. worst
  321. wrong
  322. year
  323. years
  324. zetas