full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Ryan Pfluger: The therapeutic value of photography

Unscramble the Blue Letters

In case there's any csunfoion, that's me up there. (Laughter) Enjoying the spotlight or commanding attention does not come naturally to me. Blending into the background, analyzing and observing a situation, is where I find the most comfort, or, as I'll get to later on in this talk, when I'm on the road by myself. Unless this lady is with me. Yes, I'm referring to my camera as a lady. (Laughter) She is my safety blanket, and I've spent more time with my camera than with most ppleoe in my life. I'm an artist, I am a photographer, I'm a self-described nomadic creator. It's one of those creative professions that when you tell people, they say, "Wow, I wish I could do that!" Or, "What do you really do for work?" (Laughter) Or my personal favorite, "Did you go to school for this?" (Laughter) And, as with most things that we don't have personal experience with, we make our own assumptions and judgments based off of the only tliabnge things that we can grab from. So, when you say "photographer," people often think "weddings," or "high school portraits," or the ridiculous way ptpearhgorohs are depicted in TV and movies. And I am going to show you what I do and why I do it. Now, when people first meet me or hear about me, this is what they're interested in. Now, I could stand here and I can talk about how I've brushed shoulders with world leaders, and my surreal five minutes that I spent with President Obama. Or I could talk about photographing Hillary Clinton a week before the election, after a rally in North Carolina. Or the tremendous eoinaomtl weight for myself photographing Darren Wilson a year after the envtes in Ferguson, Missouri, for the New Yorker, to then, only a year later, pptoorhagh Bryan Stevenson, and he is an advocate and a lawyer based out of Mobile, Alabama, who fights for the under-represented, and we had a conversation about race that still stays with me taody. Or just what's the easiest and what most people can relate to: celebrity. So, I could talk about Agelina Jolie, or I could talk about the TV icon that's sraah Jessica Parker, or I can just talk about the numerous actors and mcsiauins and notable people that I've interacted with over the last decade. And I love my job and I love my work, but that's not what I'm here to talk to you about. I'm going to talk about when I'm in my 2003 bucik, driving cross-country for weeks at a time, and how that's when I'm feeling the most fulfilled. But first, I need to give a little backstory on me and why I do what I do. So, think of it like in an abridged espidoe of "This aeimcarn Life," just not that long. (lteahgur) So, I am a white, cis, queer man from a working-class family in New York, and with all things being relative, I didn't grow up with the umostt privilege, and it wasn't uniquely terrible either. My parents, however, were too involved with their own demons for me to ever truly feel seen or heard. And it wasn't necessarily their fault. It was merely just a casualty of their reality. Depression, addiction, anegr, resentment overwhelmed both of them. When I was seven, my mother was diagnosed with cncear. It was the first of a decade-long battle that she ended up svviuinrg from. It was also the same time that she shoewd me how to make her a screwdriver. When I was ten, I knew that I was queer, or that I at least liked boys, and by 13, my mother oeutd me. It was an experience that let me fnelieg like my iittdney was stripped from me. By 14, my dad had a DUI or two, I don't really remember. By 16, he moved out of the house, and by 18, I didn't really speak to either of them. So, my world up until this point made me feel that my eeeexnrpcis and my feelings would never actually carpmoe to that of my parents. And ilctnltlaeleuy, I knew better, but I didn't actually know what would make me feel differently. All I knew was that I didn't want anyone that came into my life to ever feel like they were not seen. And then, I picked up a camera. For me, photography was always really interesting because of the imdieacmy and collaborative nature of it. It would be a way for me to meet people that were outside of the safe mental bubble that I had created for myself. And so, I started photographing, and as I started interacting with other people, I realized that the interaction itself was actually more intsnreietg to me than the photograph. When I started realizing that, and I thought about my dad, who had recently got sober, I wanted him to feel seen. So, at this point, he and I were still very estranged, and I was in graduate soochl and my professor, Collier srohcr, said something to me that still eechos in my head pretty much every day: my work was "too easy," and just because I could make something that "looked good" did not mean that it was interesting. And so, I needed to challenge myself and my crfat. Ironically enough, after years of sinepdng my time making myself feel comfortable, I needed to be ubtncmforaloe again. So, I asked my dad if he would be willing to sit for a pirarott. This was the first one that I took of him. Then, I took a break because I needed to do a lot of soul-searching to figure out what it was that I actually wanted to do with him. And so, I cuinteond to photograph him and we started to have a dialogue, but it was through pgoohrhapts. And I even actually started taking potairtrs of myself with him because I wanted to, at first, just have a cosle pcahsyil proximity to him. And the idea of this made me raziele I ndeeed full immersion, I needed no easy escape plan. And so, I aeksd him, kind of not even thinking it would happen, if he would go on the road trip that we never took when I was a kid, and surprisingly, he said, "Yeah, sure, let's do it." And so, he and I hit the road, and as this happened, we settard creating this fantasy rnshitleiaop that never actually existed. (Laughter) But the epecxienre of making these photographs created a bond between the two of us that we were incapable of doing otherwise. It was my a-ha moment for photography. I was using my camera as a therapist. It became this third party that allowed the two of us to communicate with each other even when we weren't actually talking. We finally actually saw each other. So, fast-forward about a decade later, and I am no longer winrkog with my dad, but I am photographing strangers spontaneously that I meet on the road. Now, about a month before the election, I was having teomrdunes anxiety and feeling very stagnant about my work in general. I baegn seeing feinrds whairtdw and the overall feeling of frustration on social media. And to be quite honest, I just wanted to escape. And so, I hit the road, and I didn't have any destinations in mind. I just knew I wanted to divre cross-country and I wanted to escape. And then, about a day into being on the road, I realized I needed to be doing something while I was on the road, because being just with yourself can lead to a lot, a lot of soul-searching. So, once I realized I wanetd to be doing something, I thought back to the time with my dad and how pioatvl and also very chtiaratc it was for me, for my craft and also my mental health. And so, I wanted to do that with strregnas, and I went on Instagram, I went on Facebook, I downloaded all of the dating and hook-up apps, and I started messaging everyone that I could within every town that I stopped in. Now, when a stranger approaches you online, it leads to a little hesitation. And I say "stranger" and I just want to let you know I'm utilizing a community that is already comfortable for me, and that's of gay or queer-identifying men. And so, I would send messages with a brief little description of what I was doing. I wanted to come and meet you, I wanted to come to your home, we could meet in public, and I wanted to take your portrait - I got the majority of [them] being noes, and a lot of variations of, "That's creepy" or - (Laughter) "I don't really photograph well." But there was something that did come up prtety often, and it was, "Why me?" And it was that other a-ha moment for me. There didn't need to be a "why me." I wanted everyone that I interacted with to not only feel scaeipl, but to also feel like their soitres could be heard. So, this body of work, it's called "The Day of The Lone Wolf," and it's from a book called "The Secret [Language] of Birthdays," and it happens to be the day that I was born on. Now, I casually mentioned my mtheor earlier, and it was by no adcicnet. Her and I are still enrsegatd, but I wanted to take this memont to thank her. When I was younger, she read to me from The Secret Language of Birthdays, and she used the personality tatris that were depicted for The Day of The Lone Wolf, both to criticize and also occasionally apapirse me, such as emotionally "sensitive," and "impulsive," and "contradictory." Now in my mid 30's I've reclaimed my identity as a queer man and I've also racmileed The Day of The Lone Wolf, and I'm creating in honor of it. So, since that first road trip, I've gotten cross-country two more temis, and the only thing that you actually know about these photographs is the common denominator is me. Now, everyone has a story, you've been leiitsnng to mine - And so, while you may not know the particulars of their struggles or of their achievements or even of their privilege, there is one thing that you do know: they aelwlod themselves to be vulnerable with a stranger, and that's what I've done with you today. Thank you. (Applause)

Open Cloze

In case there's any _________, that's me up there. (Laughter) Enjoying the spotlight or commanding attention does not come naturally to me. Blending into the background, analyzing and observing a situation, is where I find the most comfort, or, as I'll get to later on in this talk, when I'm on the road by myself. Unless this lady is with me. Yes, I'm referring to my camera as a lady. (Laughter) She is my safety blanket, and I've spent more time with my camera than with most ______ in my life. I'm an artist, I am a photographer, I'm a self-described nomadic creator. It's one of those creative professions that when you tell people, they say, "Wow, I wish I could do that!" Or, "What do you really do for work?" (Laughter) Or my personal favorite, "Did you go to school for this?" (Laughter) And, as with most things that we don't have personal experience with, we make our own assumptions and judgments based off of the only ________ things that we can grab from. So, when you say "photographer," people often think "weddings," or "high school portraits," or the ridiculous way _____________ are depicted in TV and movies. And I am going to show you what I do and why I do it. Now, when people first meet me or hear about me, this is what they're interested in. Now, I could stand here and I can talk about how I've brushed shoulders with world leaders, and my surreal five minutes that I spent with President Obama. Or I could talk about photographing Hillary Clinton a week before the election, after a rally in North Carolina. Or the tremendous _________ weight for myself photographing Darren Wilson a year after the ______ in Ferguson, Missouri, for the New Yorker, to then, only a year later, __________ Bryan Stevenson, and he is an advocate and a lawyer based out of Mobile, Alabama, who fights for the under-represented, and we had a conversation about race that still stays with me _____. Or just what's the easiest and what most people can relate to: celebrity. So, I could talk about Agelina Jolie, or I could talk about the TV icon that's _____ Jessica Parker, or I can just talk about the numerous actors and _________ and notable people that I've interacted with over the last decade. And I love my job and I love my work, but that's not what I'm here to talk to you about. I'm going to talk about when I'm in my 2003 _____, driving cross-country for weeks at a time, and how that's when I'm feeling the most fulfilled. But first, I need to give a little backstory on me and why I do what I do. So, think of it like in an abridged _______ of "This ________ Life," just not that long. (________) So, I am a white, cis, queer man from a working-class family in New York, and with all things being relative, I didn't grow up with the ______ privilege, and it wasn't uniquely terrible either. My parents, however, were too involved with their own demons for me to ever truly feel seen or heard. And it wasn't necessarily their fault. It was merely just a casualty of their reality. Depression, addiction, _____, resentment overwhelmed both of them. When I was seven, my mother was diagnosed with ______. It was the first of a decade-long battle that she ended up _________ from. It was also the same time that she ______ me how to make her a screwdriver. When I was ten, I knew that I was queer, or that I at least liked boys, and by 13, my mother _____ me. It was an experience that let me _______ like my ________ was stripped from me. By 14, my dad had a DUI or two, I don't really remember. By 16, he moved out of the house, and by 18, I didn't really speak to either of them. So, my world up until this point made me feel that my ___________ and my feelings would never actually _______ to that of my parents. And ______________, I knew better, but I didn't actually know what would make me feel differently. All I knew was that I didn't want anyone that came into my life to ever feel like they were not seen. And then, I picked up a camera. For me, photography was always really interesting because of the _________ and collaborative nature of it. It would be a way for me to meet people that were outside of the safe mental bubble that I had created for myself. And so, I started photographing, and as I started interacting with other people, I realized that the interaction itself was actually more ___________ to me than the photograph. When I started realizing that, and I thought about my dad, who had recently got sober, I wanted him to feel seen. So, at this point, he and I were still very estranged, and I was in graduate ______ and my professor, Collier ______, said something to me that still ______ in my head pretty much every day: my work was "too easy," and just because I could make something that "looked good" did not mean that it was interesting. And so, I needed to challenge myself and my _____. Ironically enough, after years of ________ my time making myself feel comfortable, I needed to be _____________ again. So, I asked my dad if he would be willing to sit for a ________. This was the first one that I took of him. Then, I took a break because I needed to do a lot of soul-searching to figure out what it was that I actually wanted to do with him. And so, I _________ to photograph him and we started to have a dialogue, but it was through ___________. And I even actually started taking _________ of myself with him because I wanted to, at first, just have a _____ ________ proximity to him. And the idea of this made me _______ I ______ full immersion, I needed no easy escape plan. And so, I _____ him, kind of not even thinking it would happen, if he would go on the road trip that we never took when I was a kid, and surprisingly, he said, "Yeah, sure, let's do it." And so, he and I hit the road, and as this happened, we _______ creating this fantasy ____________ that never actually existed. (Laughter) But the __________ of making these photographs created a bond between the two of us that we were incapable of doing otherwise. It was my a-ha moment for photography. I was using my camera as a therapist. It became this third party that allowed the two of us to communicate with each other even when we weren't actually talking. We finally actually saw each other. So, fast-forward about a decade later, and I am no longer _______ with my dad, but I am photographing strangers spontaneously that I meet on the road. Now, about a month before the election, I was having __________ anxiety and feeling very stagnant about my work in general. I _____ seeing _______ ________ and the overall feeling of frustration on social media. And to be quite honest, I just wanted to escape. And so, I hit the road, and I didn't have any destinations in mind. I just knew I wanted to _____ cross-country and I wanted to escape. And then, about a day into being on the road, I realized I needed to be doing something while I was on the road, because being just with yourself can lead to a lot, a lot of soul-searching. So, once I realized I ______ to be doing something, I thought back to the time with my dad and how _______ and also very _________ it was for me, for my craft and also my mental health. And so, I wanted to do that with _________, and I went on Instagram, I went on Facebook, I downloaded all of the dating and hook-up apps, and I started messaging everyone that I could within every town that I stopped in. Now, when a stranger approaches you online, it leads to a little hesitation. And I say "stranger" and I just want to let you know I'm utilizing a community that is already comfortable for me, and that's of gay or queer-identifying men. And so, I would send messages with a brief little description of what I was doing. I wanted to come and meet you, I wanted to come to your home, we could meet in public, and I wanted to take your portrait - I got the majority of [them] being noes, and a lot of variations of, "That's creepy" or - (Laughter) "I don't really photograph well." But there was something that did come up ______ often, and it was, "Why me?" And it was that other a-ha moment for me. There didn't need to be a "why me." I wanted everyone that I interacted with to not only feel _______, but to also feel like their _______ could be heard. So, this body of work, it's called "The Day of The Lone Wolf," and it's from a book called "The Secret [Language] of Birthdays," and it happens to be the day that I was born on. Now, I casually mentioned my ______ earlier, and it was by no ________. Her and I are still _________, but I wanted to take this ______ to thank her. When I was younger, she read to me from The Secret Language of Birthdays, and she used the personality ______ that were depicted for The Day of The Lone Wolf, both to criticize and also occasionally ________ me, such as emotionally "sensitive," and "impulsive," and "contradictory." Now in my mid 30's I've reclaimed my identity as a queer man and I've also _________ The Day of The Lone Wolf, and I'm creating in honor of it. So, since that first road trip, I've gotten cross-country two more _____, and the only thing that you actually know about these photographs is the common denominator is me. Now, everyone has a story, you've been _________ to mine - And so, while you may not know the particulars of their struggles or of their achievements or even of their privilege, there is one thing that you do know: they _______ themselves to be vulnerable with a stranger, and that's what I've done with you today. Thank you. (Applause)

Solution

  1. spending
  2. times
  3. cancer
  4. photographs
  5. friends
  6. experience
  7. outed
  8. pivotal
  9. drive
  10. photographers
  11. realize
  12. withdraw
  13. laughter
  14. intellectually
  15. traits
  16. musicians
  17. started
  18. surviving
  19. cathartic
  20. echoes
  21. anger
  22. physical
  23. experiences
  24. working
  25. today
  26. needed
  27. portraits
  28. events
  29. immediacy
  30. mother
  31. stories
  32. utmost
  33. feeling
  34. accident
  35. close
  36. identity
  37. uncomfortable
  38. asked
  39. estranged
  40. appraise
  41. showed
  42. schorr
  43. pretty
  44. began
  45. tremendous
  46. american
  47. relationship
  48. people
  49. listening
  50. wanted
  51. compare
  52. sarah
  53. craft
  54. special
  55. episode
  56. tangible
  57. photograph
  58. moment
  59. reclaimed
  60. allowed
  61. emotional
  62. interesting
  63. school
  64. continued
  65. buick
  66. confusion
  67. portrait
  68. strangers

Original Text

In case there's any confusion, that's me up there. (Laughter) Enjoying the spotlight or commanding attention does not come naturally to me. Blending into the background, analyzing and observing a situation, is where I find the most comfort, or, as I'll get to later on in this talk, when I'm on the road by myself. Unless this lady is with me. Yes, I'm referring to my camera as a lady. (Laughter) She is my safety blanket, and I've spent more time with my camera than with most people in my life. I'm an artist, I am a photographer, I'm a self-described nomadic creator. It's one of those creative professions that when you tell people, they say, "Wow, I wish I could do that!" Or, "What do you really do for work?" (Laughter) Or my personal favorite, "Did you go to school for this?" (Laughter) And, as with most things that we don't have personal experience with, we make our own assumptions and judgments based off of the only tangible things that we can grab from. So, when you say "photographer," people often think "weddings," or "high school portraits," or the ridiculous way photographers are depicted in TV and movies. And I am going to show you what I do and why I do it. Now, when people first meet me or hear about me, this is what they're interested in. Now, I could stand here and I can talk about how I've brushed shoulders with world leaders, and my surreal five minutes that I spent with President Obama. Or I could talk about photographing Hillary Clinton a week before the election, after a rally in North Carolina. Or the tremendous emotional weight for myself photographing Darren Wilson a year after the events in Ferguson, Missouri, for the New Yorker, to then, only a year later, photograph Bryan Stevenson, and he is an advocate and a lawyer based out of Mobile, Alabama, who fights for the under-represented, and we had a conversation about race that still stays with me today. Or just what's the easiest and what most people can relate to: celebrity. So, I could talk about Agelina Jolie, or I could talk about the TV icon that's Sarah Jessica Parker, or I can just talk about the numerous actors and musicians and notable people that I've interacted with over the last decade. And I love my job and I love my work, but that's not what I'm here to talk to you about. I'm going to talk about when I'm in my 2003 Buick, driving cross-country for weeks at a time, and how that's when I'm feeling the most fulfilled. But first, I need to give a little backstory on me and why I do what I do. So, think of it like in an abridged episode of "This American Life," just not that long. (Laughter) So, I am a white, cis, queer man from a working-class family in New York, and with all things being relative, I didn't grow up with the utmost privilege, and it wasn't uniquely terrible either. My parents, however, were too involved with their own demons for me to ever truly feel seen or heard. And it wasn't necessarily their fault. It was merely just a casualty of their reality. Depression, addiction, anger, resentment overwhelmed both of them. When I was seven, my mother was diagnosed with cancer. It was the first of a decade-long battle that she ended up surviving from. It was also the same time that she showed me how to make her a screwdriver. When I was ten, I knew that I was queer, or that I at least liked boys, and by 13, my mother outed me. It was an experience that let me feeling like my identity was stripped from me. By 14, my dad had a DUI or two, I don't really remember. By 16, he moved out of the house, and by 18, I didn't really speak to either of them. So, my world up until this point made me feel that my experiences and my feelings would never actually compare to that of my parents. And intellectually, I knew better, but I didn't actually know what would make me feel differently. All I knew was that I didn't want anyone that came into my life to ever feel like they were not seen. And then, I picked up a camera. For me, photography was always really interesting because of the immediacy and collaborative nature of it. It would be a way for me to meet people that were outside of the safe mental bubble that I had created for myself. And so, I started photographing, and as I started interacting with other people, I realized that the interaction itself was actually more interesting to me than the photograph. When I started realizing that, and I thought about my dad, who had recently got sober, I wanted him to feel seen. So, at this point, he and I were still very estranged, and I was in graduate school and my professor, Collier Schorr, said something to me that still echoes in my head pretty much every day: my work was "too easy," and just because I could make something that "looked good" did not mean that it was interesting. And so, I needed to challenge myself and my craft. Ironically enough, after years of spending my time making myself feel comfortable, I needed to be uncomfortable again. So, I asked my dad if he would be willing to sit for a portrait. This was the first one that I took of him. Then, I took a break because I needed to do a lot of soul-searching to figure out what it was that I actually wanted to do with him. And so, I continued to photograph him and we started to have a dialogue, but it was through photographs. And I even actually started taking portraits of myself with him because I wanted to, at first, just have a close physical proximity to him. And the idea of this made me realize I needed full immersion, I needed no easy escape plan. And so, I asked him, kind of not even thinking it would happen, if he would go on the road trip that we never took when I was a kid, and surprisingly, he said, "Yeah, sure, let's do it." And so, he and I hit the road, and as this happened, we started creating this fantasy relationship that never actually existed. (Laughter) But the experience of making these photographs created a bond between the two of us that we were incapable of doing otherwise. It was my a-ha moment for photography. I was using my camera as a therapist. It became this third party that allowed the two of us to communicate with each other even when we weren't actually talking. We finally actually saw each other. So, fast-forward about a decade later, and I am no longer working with my dad, but I am photographing strangers spontaneously that I meet on the road. Now, about a month before the election, I was having tremendous anxiety and feeling very stagnant about my work in general. I began seeing friends withdraw and the overall feeling of frustration on social media. And to be quite honest, I just wanted to escape. And so, I hit the road, and I didn't have any destinations in mind. I just knew I wanted to drive cross-country and I wanted to escape. And then, about a day into being on the road, I realized I needed to be doing something while I was on the road, because being just with yourself can lead to a lot, a lot of soul-searching. So, once I realized I wanted to be doing something, I thought back to the time with my dad and how pivotal and also very cathartic it was for me, for my craft and also my mental health. And so, I wanted to do that with strangers, and I went on Instagram, I went on Facebook, I downloaded all of the dating and hook-up apps, and I started messaging everyone that I could within every town that I stopped in. Now, when a stranger approaches you online, it leads to a little hesitation. And I say "stranger" and I just want to let you know I'm utilizing a community that is already comfortable for me, and that's of gay or queer-identifying men. And so, I would send messages with a brief little description of what I was doing. I wanted to come and meet you, I wanted to come to your home, we could meet in public, and I wanted to take your portrait - I got the majority of [them] being noes, and a lot of variations of, "That's creepy" or - (Laughter) "I don't really photograph well." But there was something that did come up pretty often, and it was, "Why me?" And it was that other a-ha moment for me. There didn't need to be a "why me." I wanted everyone that I interacted with to not only feel special, but to also feel like their stories could be heard. So, this body of work, it's called "The Day of The Lone Wolf," and it's from a book called "The Secret [Language] of Birthdays," and it happens to be the day that I was born on. Now, I casually mentioned my mother earlier, and it was by no accident. Her and I are still estranged, but I wanted to take this moment to thank her. When I was younger, she read to me from The Secret Language of Birthdays, and she used the personality traits that were depicted for The Day of The Lone Wolf, both to criticize and also occasionally appraise me, such as emotionally "sensitive," and "impulsive," and "contradictory." Now in my mid 30's I've reclaimed my identity as a queer man and I've also reclaimed The Day of The Lone Wolf, and I'm creating in honor of it. So, since that first road trip, I've gotten cross-country two more times, and the only thing that you actually know about these photographs is the common denominator is me. Now, everyone has a story, you've been listening to mine - And so, while you may not know the particulars of their struggles or of their achievements or even of their privilege, there is one thing that you do know: they allowed themselves to be vulnerable with a stranger, and that's what I've done with you today. Thank you. (Applause)

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
queer man 2

Important Words

  1. abridged
  2. accident
  3. achievements
  4. actors
  5. addiction
  6. advocate
  7. agelina
  8. alabama
  9. allowed
  10. american
  11. analyzing
  12. anger
  13. anxiety
  14. applause
  15. appraise
  16. approaches
  17. apps
  18. artist
  19. asked
  20. assumptions
  21. attention
  22. background
  23. backstory
  24. based
  25. battle
  26. began
  27. birthdays
  28. blanket
  29. blending
  30. body
  31. bond
  32. book
  33. born
  34. boys
  35. break
  36. brushed
  37. bryan
  38. bubble
  39. buick
  40. called
  41. camera
  42. cancer
  43. carolina
  44. case
  45. casually
  46. casualty
  47. cathartic
  48. celebrity
  49. challenge
  50. cis
  51. clinton
  52. close
  53. collaborative
  54. collier
  55. comfort
  56. comfortable
  57. commanding
  58. common
  59. communicate
  60. community
  61. compare
  62. confusion
  63. continued
  64. conversation
  65. craft
  66. created
  67. creating
  68. creative
  69. creator
  70. criticize
  71. dad
  72. darren
  73. dating
  74. day
  75. decade
  76. demons
  77. denominator
  78. depicted
  79. depression
  80. description
  81. destinations
  82. diagnosed
  83. dialogue
  84. differently
  85. downloaded
  86. drive
  87. driving
  88. dui
  89. earlier
  90. easiest
  91. easy
  92. echoes
  93. election
  94. emotional
  95. emotionally
  96. ended
  97. enjoying
  98. episode
  99. escape
  100. estranged
  101. events
  102. existed
  103. experience
  104. experiences
  105. facebook
  106. family
  107. fantasy
  108. fault
  109. favorite
  110. feel
  111. feeling
  112. feelings
  113. ferguson
  114. fights
  115. figure
  116. finally
  117. find
  118. friends
  119. frustration
  120. fulfilled
  121. full
  122. gay
  123. general
  124. give
  125. grab
  126. graduate
  127. grow
  128. happen
  129. happened
  130. head
  131. health
  132. hear
  133. heard
  134. hesitation
  135. hillary
  136. hit
  137. home
  138. honest
  139. honor
  140. house
  141. icon
  142. idea
  143. identity
  144. immediacy
  145. immersion
  146. incapable
  147. instagram
  148. intellectually
  149. interacted
  150. interacting
  151. interaction
  152. interested
  153. interesting
  154. involved
  155. ironically
  156. jessica
  157. job
  158. jolie
  159. judgments
  160. kid
  161. kind
  162. knew
  163. lady
  164. language
  165. laughter
  166. lawyer
  167. lead
  168. leaders
  169. leads
  170. life
  171. listening
  172. lone
  173. long
  174. longer
  175. lot
  176. love
  177. majority
  178. making
  179. man
  180. media
  181. meet
  182. men
  183. mental
  184. mentioned
  185. messages
  186. messaging
  187. mid
  188. mind
  189. minutes
  190. missouri
  191. mobile
  192. moment
  193. month
  194. mother
  195. moved
  196. movies
  197. musicians
  198. naturally
  199. nature
  200. necessarily
  201. needed
  202. noes
  203. nomadic
  204. north
  205. notable
  206. numerous
  207. obama
  208. observing
  209. occasionally
  210. online
  211. outed
  212. overwhelmed
  213. parents
  214. parker
  215. particulars
  216. party
  217. people
  218. personal
  219. personality
  220. photograph
  221. photographer
  222. photographers
  223. photographing
  224. photographs
  225. photography
  226. physical
  227. picked
  228. pivotal
  229. plan
  230. point
  231. portrait
  232. portraits
  233. president
  234. pretty
  235. privilege
  236. professions
  237. professor
  238. proximity
  239. public
  240. queer
  241. race
  242. rally
  243. read
  244. reality
  245. realize
  246. realized
  247. realizing
  248. reclaimed
  249. referring
  250. relate
  251. relationship
  252. relative
  253. remember
  254. resentment
  255. ridiculous
  256. road
  257. safe
  258. safety
  259. sarah
  260. school
  261. schorr
  262. screwdriver
  263. secret
  264. send
  265. shoulders
  266. show
  267. showed
  268. sit
  269. situation
  270. sober
  271. social
  272. speak
  273. special
  274. spending
  275. spent
  276. spontaneously
  277. spotlight
  278. stagnant
  279. stand
  280. started
  281. stays
  282. stevenson
  283. stopped
  284. stories
  285. story
  286. stranger
  287. strangers
  288. stripped
  289. struggles
  290. surprisingly
  291. surreal
  292. surviving
  293. talk
  294. talking
  295. tangible
  296. ten
  297. terrible
  298. therapist
  299. thinking
  300. thought
  301. time
  302. times
  303. today
  304. town
  305. traits
  306. tremendous
  307. trip
  308. tv
  309. uncomfortable
  310. uniquely
  311. utilizing
  312. utmost
  313. variations
  314. vulnerable
  315. wanted
  316. week
  317. weeks
  318. weight
  319. white
  320. wilson
  321. withdraw
  322. wolf
  323. work
  324. working
  325. world
  326. year
  327. years
  328. york
  329. yorker
  330. younger