full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Thomas Insel: Toward a new understanding of mental illness

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Now, already in the case of the brain disorders that I've been talking to you about, depression, obsessive cimsoluvpe disorder, post-traumatic stress dodeisrr, while we don't have an in-depth understanding of how they are abnormally processed or what the brain is doing in these illnesses, we have been able to already identify some of the connectional differences, or some of the ways in which the circuitry is different for people who have these disorders. We call this the human ctoenmncoe, and you can think about the connectome sort of as the wiring diagram of the brain. You'll hear more about this in a few minutes. The important piece here is that as you begin to look at people who have these disorders, the one in five of us who struggle in some way, you find that there's a lot of variation in the way that the brain is wired, but there are some predictable prttaens, and those patterns are risk ftacors for dvilepoeng one of these disorders. It's a little different than the way we think about biarn disorders like Huntington's or Parkinson's or Alzheimer's desasie where you have a bombed-out part of your cortex. Here we're talking about traffic jams, or sometimes detours, or sometimes problems with just the way that things are connected and the way that the brain functions. You could, if you want, compare this to, on the one hand, a myocardial infarction, a heart attack, where you have dead tissue in the herat, versus an arrhythmia, where the organ smlpiy isn't functioning because of the communication problems within it. Either one would kill you; in only one of them will you find a major losein.

Open Cloze

Now, already in the case of the brain disorders that I've been talking to you about, depression, obsessive __________ disorder, post-traumatic stress ________, while we don't have an in-depth understanding of how they are abnormally processed or what the brain is doing in these illnesses, we have been able to already identify some of the connectional differences, or some of the ways in which the circuitry is different for people who have these disorders. We call this the human __________, and you can think about the connectome sort of as the wiring diagram of the brain. You'll hear more about this in a few minutes. The important piece here is that as you begin to look at people who have these disorders, the one in five of us who struggle in some way, you find that there's a lot of variation in the way that the brain is wired, but there are some predictable ________, and those patterns are risk _______ for __________ one of these disorders. It's a little different than the way we think about _____ disorders like Huntington's or Parkinson's or Alzheimer's _______ where you have a bombed-out part of your cortex. Here we're talking about traffic jams, or sometimes detours, or sometimes problems with just the way that things are connected and the way that the brain functions. You could, if you want, compare this to, on the one hand, a myocardial infarction, a heart attack, where you have dead tissue in the _____, versus an arrhythmia, where the organ ______ isn't functioning because of the communication problems within it. Either one would kill you; in only one of them will you find a major ______.

Solution

  1. brain
  2. disorder
  3. factors
  4. disease
  5. compulsive
  6. patterns
  7. connectome
  8. developing
  9. lesion
  10. heart
  11. simply

Original Text

Now, already in the case of the brain disorders that I've been talking to you about, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, while we don't have an in-depth understanding of how they are abnormally processed or what the brain is doing in these illnesses, we have been able to already identify some of the connectional differences, or some of the ways in which the circuitry is different for people who have these disorders. We call this the human connectome, and you can think about the connectome sort of as the wiring diagram of the brain. You'll hear more about this in a few minutes. The important piece here is that as you begin to look at people who have these disorders, the one in five of us who struggle in some way, you find that there's a lot of variation in the way that the brain is wired, but there are some predictable patterns, and those patterns are risk factors for developing one of these disorders. It's a little different than the way we think about brain disorders like Huntington's or Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease where you have a bombed-out part of your cortex. Here we're talking about traffic jams, or sometimes detours, or sometimes problems with just the way that things are connected and the way that the brain functions. You could, if you want, compare this to, on the one hand, a myocardial infarction, a heart attack, where you have dead tissue in the heart, versus an arrhythmia, where the organ simply isn't functioning because of the communication problems within it. Either one would kill you; in only one of them will you find a major lesion.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
heart disease 5
brain disorders 3
mortality rate 2
biggest killers 2
early intervention 2

Important Words

  1. abnormally
  2. arrhythmia
  3. attack
  4. brain
  5. call
  6. case
  7. circuitry
  8. communication
  9. compare
  10. compulsive
  11. connected
  12. connectional
  13. connectome
  14. cortex
  15. dead
  16. depression
  17. detours
  18. developing
  19. diagram
  20. differences
  21. disease
  22. disorder
  23. disorders
  24. factors
  25. find
  26. functioning
  27. functions
  28. hand
  29. hear
  30. heart
  31. human
  32. identify
  33. illnesses
  34. important
  35. infarction
  36. jams
  37. kill
  38. lesion
  39. lot
  40. major
  41. minutes
  42. myocardial
  43. obsessive
  44. organ
  45. part
  46. patterns
  47. people
  48. piece
  49. predictable
  50. problems
  51. processed
  52. risk
  53. simply
  54. sort
  55. stress
  56. struggle
  57. talking
  58. tissue
  59. traffic
  60. understanding
  61. variation
  62. ways
  63. wired
  64. wiring