full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Katherine M. Gehl: US politics isn't broken. It's fixed

Unscramble the Blue Letters

OK, now let's talk about bad rule number two: plurality vitong, which I'll explain in just a moment. In any other industry as big and as thriving as politics with this much customer dissatisfaction and only two companies, some entrepreneur would see a phenomenal business otpunoritpy and cerate a new cmeottpior. But that doesn't happen in piilocts. Our current patries don't feel competitive pressure to sevre the public interest, in large part because of one rule that keeps out almost all new competition: plirtauly voting. It sounds fancy, but it simply means the catdndiae with the most votes wins. That also seems logical, but it's a really bad idea. Why? Because in the United States you can win almost any election, even if a majority didn't vote for you. For example, in this three-way race, the winner only has 34 percent of the votes. Sixty-six percent of the voters, most people, wanted someone else. With plurality voting, we may not feel free to vote for the candidate we really want because we're aifrad that we'll just waste our vote, or worse, will spoil the election.

Open Cloze

OK, now let's talk about bad rule number two: plurality ______, which I'll explain in just a moment. In any other industry as big and as thriving as politics with this much customer dissatisfaction and only two companies, some entrepreneur would see a phenomenal business ___________ and ______ a new __________. But that doesn't happen in ________. Our current _______ don't feel competitive pressure to _____ the public interest, in large part because of one rule that keeps out almost all new competition: _________ voting. It sounds fancy, but it simply means the _________ with the most votes wins. That also seems logical, but it's a really bad idea. Why? Because in the United States you can win almost any election, even if a majority didn't vote for you. For example, in this three-way race, the winner only has 34 percent of the votes. Sixty-six percent of the voters, most people, wanted someone else. With plurality voting, we may not feel free to vote for the candidate we really want because we're ______ that we'll just waste our vote, or worse, will spoil the election.

Solution

  1. competitor
  2. create
  3. parties
  4. candidate
  5. serve
  6. politics
  7. afraid
  8. voting
  9. plurality
  10. opportunity

Original Text

OK, now let's talk about bad rule number two: plurality voting, which I'll explain in just a moment. In any other industry as big and as thriving as politics with this much customer dissatisfaction and only two companies, some entrepreneur would see a phenomenal business opportunity and create a new competitor. But that doesn't happen in politics. Our current parties don't feel competitive pressure to serve the public interest, in large part because of one rule that keeps out almost all new competition: plurality voting. It sounds fancy, but it simply means the candidate with the most votes wins. That also seems logical, but it's a really bad idea. Why? Because in the United States you can win almost any election, even if a majority didn't vote for you. For example, in this three-way race, the winner only has 34 percent of the votes. Sixty-six percent of the voters, most people, wanted someone else. With plurality voting, we may not feel free to vote for the candidate we really want because we're afraid that we'll just waste our vote, or worse, will spoil the election.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
politics industry 6
healthy competition 5
party primaries 5
industry theory 3
general election 3
happier customers 2
public interest 2
bad rule 2
rule number 2
election ballot 2
plurality voting 2
instant runoffs 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
politics industry theory 3
bad rule number 2
general election ballot 2

Important Words

  1. afraid
  2. bad
  3. big
  4. business
  5. candidate
  6. companies
  7. competitive
  8. competitor
  9. create
  10. current
  11. customer
  12. dissatisfaction
  13. election
  14. entrepreneur
  15. explain
  16. fancy
  17. feel
  18. free
  19. happen
  20. idea
  21. industry
  22. interest
  23. large
  24. logical
  25. majority
  26. means
  27. moment
  28. number
  29. opportunity
  30. part
  31. parties
  32. people
  33. percent
  34. phenomenal
  35. plurality
  36. politics
  37. pressure
  38. public
  39. race
  40. rule
  41. serve
  42. simply
  43. sounds
  44. spoil
  45. states
  46. talk
  47. thriving
  48. united
  49. vote
  50. voters
  51. votes
  52. voting
  53. wanted
  54. waste
  55. win
  56. winner
  57. wins
  58. worse