full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Andreas Schleicher: Use data to build better schools"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

But let's step back for a moment and focus on the countries that actually started PISA, and I'm giving them a colored bubble now. And I'm mkniag the size of the bblbue proportional to the amount of money that countries spent on students. If money would tell you everything about the qutilay of lreniang outcomes, you would find all the large bubbles at the top, no? But that's not what you see. Spending per student only explains about, well, less than 20 percent of the performance vaoritian among countries, and lruoumxebg, for example, the most expensive system, doesn't do particularly well. What you see is that two countries with siialmr spending achieve very different results. You also see — and I think that's one of the most encouraging findings — that we no longer live in a world that is neatly divided between rich and well-educated cnieoturs, and poor and badly-educated ones, a very, very important lesson.

Open Cloze

But let's step back for a moment and focus on the countries that actually started PISA, and I'm giving them a colored bubble now. And I'm ______ the size of the ______ proportional to the amount of money that countries spent on students. If money would tell you everything about the _______ of ________ outcomes, you would find all the large bubbles at the top, no? But that's not what you see. Spending per student only explains about, well, less than 20 percent of the performance _________ among countries, and __________, for example, the most expensive system, doesn't do particularly well. What you see is that two countries with _______ spending achieve very different results. You also see — and I think that's one of the most encouraging findings — that we no longer live in a world that is neatly divided between rich and well-educated _________, and poor and badly-educated ones, a very, very important lesson.

Solution

  1. bubble
  2. variation
  3. making
  4. luxembourg
  5. similar
  6. countries
  7. quality
  8. learning

Original Text

But let's step back for a moment and focus on the countries that actually started PISA, and I'm giving them a colored bubble now. And I'm making the size of the bubble proportional to the amount of money that countries spent on students. If money would tell you everything about the quality of learning outcomes, you would find all the large bubbles at the top, no? But that's not what you see. Spending per student only explains about, well, less than 20 percent of the performance variation among countries, and Luxembourg, for example, the most expensive system, doesn't do particularly well. What you see is that two countries with similar spending achieve very different results. You also see — and I think that's one of the most encouraging findings — that we no longer live in a world that is neatly divided between rich and well-educated countries, and poor and badly-educated ones, a very, very important lesson.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
high performing 7
performing systems 6
education systems 4
year olds 3
social disparities 3
high levels 3
young children 3
school systems 3

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
high performing systems 6

Important Words

  1. achieve
  2. amount
  3. bubble
  4. bubbles
  5. colored
  6. countries
  7. divided
  8. encouraging
  9. expensive
  10. explains
  11. find
  12. findings
  13. focus
  14. giving
  15. important
  16. large
  17. learning
  18. lesson
  19. live
  20. longer
  21. luxembourg
  22. making
  23. moment
  24. money
  25. neatly
  26. outcomes
  27. percent
  28. performance
  29. pisa
  30. poor
  31. proportional
  32. quality
  33. results
  34. rich
  35. similar
  36. size
  37. spending
  38. spent
  39. started
  40. step
  41. student
  42. students
  43. system
  44. top
  45. variation
  46. world