full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Adam de la Zerda: We can start winning the war against cancer"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

So we're going to play a little eixnrempet here. I'm going to ask each of you to now play and imagine that you are brain surgeons. And you guys are now at an otaerpnig room, and there's a patient in front of you, and your task is to make sure that the tumor is out. So you're looking down at the paitent, the skin and the skull have already been removed, so you're looking at the brain. And all you know about this patient is that there's a tumor about the size of a golf ball or so in the right frontal lobe of this person's brain. And that's more or less it. So you're looking down, and unfortunately everything looks the same, because brain cancer tissue and healthy brain tissue really just look the same. And so you're going in with your tmuhb, and you start to press a little bit on the brain, because tumors tend to be a little harder, sffeitr, and so you go in and go a little bit like this and say, "It seems like the tumor is right there." Then you take out your knife and start cutting the tumor picee by piece by piece. And as you're taking the tumor out, then you're getting to a sagte where you think, "Alright, I'm done. I took out everything." And at this stage, if that's — so far everything sounded, like, pretty carzy — you're now about to face the most challenging decision of your life here. Because now you need to ddecie, should I stop here and let this patient go, risking that there might be some leftover cancer cells behind that I just couldn't see, or should I take away some extra margins, typically about an inch or so around the tomur just to be sure that I removed everything?

Open Cloze

So we're going to play a little __________ here. I'm going to ask each of you to now play and imagine that you are brain surgeons. And you guys are now at an _________ room, and there's a patient in front of you, and your task is to make sure that the tumor is out. So you're looking down at the _______, the skin and the skull have already been removed, so you're looking at the brain. And all you know about this patient is that there's a tumor about the size of a golf ball or so in the right frontal lobe of this person's brain. And that's more or less it. So you're looking down, and unfortunately everything looks the same, because brain cancer tissue and healthy brain tissue really just look the same. And so you're going in with your _____, and you start to press a little bit on the brain, because tumors tend to be a little harder, _______, and so you go in and go a little bit like this and say, "It seems like the tumor is right there." Then you take out your knife and start cutting the tumor _____ by piece by piece. And as you're taking the tumor out, then you're getting to a _____ where you think, "Alright, I'm done. I took out everything." And at this stage, if that's — so far everything sounded, like, pretty _____ — you're now about to face the most challenging decision of your life here. Because now you need to ______, should I stop here and let this patient go, risking that there might be some leftover cancer cells behind that I just couldn't see, or should I take away some extra margins, typically about an inch or so around the _____ just to be sure that I removed everything?

Solution

  1. crazy
  2. patient
  3. thumb
  4. tumor
  5. experiment
  6. operating
  7. decide
  8. piece
  9. stiffer
  10. stage

Original Text

So we're going to play a little experiment here. I'm going to ask each of you to now play and imagine that you are brain surgeons. And you guys are now at an operating room, and there's a patient in front of you, and your task is to make sure that the tumor is out. So you're looking down at the patient, the skin and the skull have already been removed, so you're looking at the brain. And all you know about this patient is that there's a tumor about the size of a golf ball or so in the right frontal lobe of this person's brain. And that's more or less it. So you're looking down, and unfortunately everything looks the same, because brain cancer tissue and healthy brain tissue really just look the same. And so you're going in with your thumb, and you start to press a little bit on the brain, because tumors tend to be a little harder, stiffer, and so you go in and go a little bit like this and say, "It seems like the tumor is right there." Then you take out your knife and start cutting the tumor piece by piece by piece. And as you're taking the tumor out, then you're getting to a stage where you think, "Alright, I'm done. I took out everything." And at this stage, if that's — so far everything sounded, like, pretty crazy — you're now about to face the most challenging decision of your life here. Because now you need to decide, should I stop here and let this patient go, risking that there might be some leftover cancer cells behind that I just couldn't see, or should I take away some extra margins, typically about an inch or so around the tumor just to be sure that I removed everything?

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
brain cancer 9
cancer cells 6
medical imaging 4
stomach cancer 3
leftover tumors 3
large number 3
hot spots 3
healthy brain 3
extra margins 3
cancer research 3

Important Words

  1. ball
  2. bit
  3. brain
  4. cancer
  5. cells
  6. challenging
  7. crazy
  8. cutting
  9. decide
  10. decision
  11. experiment
  12. extra
  13. face
  14. front
  15. frontal
  16. golf
  17. guys
  18. harder
  19. healthy
  20. imagine
  21. inch
  22. knife
  23. leftover
  24. life
  25. lobe
  26. margins
  27. operating
  28. patient
  29. piece
  30. play
  31. press
  32. pretty
  33. removed
  34. risking
  35. room
  36. size
  37. skin
  38. skull
  39. sounded
  40. stage
  41. start
  42. stiffer
  43. stop
  44. surgeons
  45. task
  46. tend
  47. thumb
  48. tissue
  49. tumor
  50. tumors
  51. typically