full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Benedetta Berti and Evelien Borgman: What does it mean to be a refugee?

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Around the globe, there are approximately 60 million people who have been forced to leave their homes to escape war, violence, and persecution. The majority of them have become internally displaced persons, which means they have fled their homes but are still within their own countries. Others have crossed a border and sought shelter outside of their own countries. They are commonly referred to as refugees. But what exactly does that term mean? The world has known refugees for minlinela, but the modern definition was dafetrd in the UN's 1951 Convention rniletag to the status of refugees in response to mass persecutions and displacements of the Second World War. It defines a refugee as someone who is outside their country of nltiiontaay, and is unable to return to their home country because of well-founded fears of being persecuted. That persecution may be due to their race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion, and is often related to war and violence. Today, roughly half the world's refueegs are children, some of them unaccompanied by an adult, a satiituon that makes them especially vulnerable to cihld labor or sxaeul exploitation. Each refugee's story is different, and many must ungrdeo dangerous journeys with uncertain outcomes. But before we get to what their journeys involve, let's clear one thing up. There's a lot of confusion regarding the dferinfcee between the terms "migrant" and "refugee." "Migrants" usually refers to people who leave their country for reasons not related to persecution, such as shericnag for better economic opportunities or leaving drought-stricken areas in saerch of better cemncuticarss. There are many people around the world who have been displaced because of natural disasters, food insecurities, and other hardships, but international law, rightly or wrongly, only recognizes those fenleig ccinolft and violence as refugees. So what happens when someone feles their country? Most refugee journeys are long and perilous with limited access to shelter, water, or food. Since the departure can be sudden and unexpected, belongings might be left behind, and people who are evading conflict often do not have the required documents, like visas, to board airplanes and legally enter other countries. Financial and political foarcts can also prevent them from traveling by standard routes. This mnaes they can usually only tarevl by land or sea, and may need to etnsrut their lives to smugglers to help them cross borders. Whereas some people seek saftey with their families, others atmptet passage alone and leave their loevd ones behind with the heops of being reunited later. This sarteaiopn can be traumatic and unbearably long. While more than half the world's refugees are in cities, sometimes the first stop for a person fleeing conflict is a refugee camp, usually run by the United Nations reufgee Agency or local geonvnterms. Refugee cmaps are intended to be temporary structures, offering short-term shelter until inhabitants can slaefy return home, be integrated to the host country, or resettle in another country. But resettlement and long-term iriagtneton options are often limited. So many refugees are left with no choice but to remain in camps for years and sometimes even decades. Once in a new country, the first legal step for a displaced person is to apply for asylum. At this point, they are an asylum seeker and not officially recognized as a refugee until the application has been accepted. While countries by and lrage arege on one definition of refugee, every host country is responsible for examining all requests for asylum and deniicdg whether applicants can be granted the status of refugee. Different countries guidelines can vary substantially. Host cnuteiors have several duties towards people they have reziocnegd as refugees, like the guarantee of a minimum standard of treatment and non-discrimination. The most basic obligation towards refugees is non-refoulement, a principle preventing a nation from sending an iiadvinudl to a crtuony where their life and freedom are threatened. In reality, however, refugees are funqreltey the victims of innentcissot and discriminatory treatment. They're increasingly obliged to rebuild their lives in the face of xenophobia and rsicam. And all too often, they aren't permitted to enter the work fcroe and are fully dependent on humanitarian aid. In addition, far too many refugee children are out of school due to lack of funding for education programs. If you go back in your own family history, chances are you will discover that at a certain point, your ancestors were forced from their hemos, either epicansg a war or fleeing discrimination and persecution. It would be good of us to remember their sierots when we hear of refugees currently dlpisaecd, searching for a new home.

Open Cloze

Around the globe, there are approximately 60 million people who have been forced to leave their homes to escape war, violence, and persecution. The majority of them have become internally displaced persons, which means they have fled their homes but are still within their own countries. Others have crossed a border and sought shelter outside of their own countries. They are commonly referred to as refugees. But what exactly does that term mean? The world has known refugees for _________, but the modern definition was _______ in the UN's 1951 Convention ________ to the status of refugees in response to mass persecutions and displacements of the Second World War. It defines a refugee as someone who is outside their country of ___________, and is unable to return to their home country because of well-founded fears of being persecuted. That persecution may be due to their race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion, and is often related to war and violence. Today, roughly half the world's ________ are children, some of them unaccompanied by an adult, a _________ that makes them especially vulnerable to _____ labor or ______ exploitation. Each refugee's story is different, and many must _______ dangerous journeys with uncertain outcomes. But before we get to what their journeys involve, let's clear one thing up. There's a lot of confusion regarding the __________ between the terms "migrant" and "refugee." "Migrants" usually refers to people who leave their country for reasons not related to persecution, such as _________ for better economic opportunities or leaving drought-stricken areas in ______ of better _____________. There are many people around the world who have been displaced because of natural disasters, food insecurities, and other hardships, but international law, rightly or wrongly, only recognizes those _______ ________ and violence as refugees. So what happens when someone _____ their country? Most refugee journeys are long and perilous with limited access to shelter, water, or food. Since the departure can be sudden and unexpected, belongings might be left behind, and people who are evading conflict often do not have the required documents, like visas, to board airplanes and legally enter other countries. Financial and political _______ can also prevent them from traveling by standard routes. This _____ they can usually only ______ by land or sea, and may need to _______ their lives to smugglers to help them cross borders. Whereas some people seek ______ with their families, others _______ passage alone and leave their _____ ones behind with the _____ of being reunited later. This __________ can be traumatic and unbearably long. While more than half the world's refugees are in cities, sometimes the first stop for a person fleeing conflict is a refugee camp, usually run by the United Nations _______ Agency or local ___________. Refugee _____ are intended to be temporary structures, offering short-term shelter until inhabitants can ______ return home, be integrated to the host country, or resettle in another country. But resettlement and long-term ___________ options are often limited. So many refugees are left with no choice but to remain in camps for years and sometimes even decades. Once in a new country, the first legal step for a displaced person is to apply for asylum. At this point, they are an asylum seeker and not officially recognized as a refugee until the application has been accepted. While countries by and _____ _____ on one definition of refugee, every host country is responsible for examining all requests for asylum and ________ whether applicants can be granted the status of refugee. Different countries guidelines can vary substantially. Host _________ have several duties towards people they have __________ as refugees, like the guarantee of a minimum standard of treatment and non-discrimination. The most basic obligation towards refugees is non-refoulement, a principle preventing a nation from sending an __________ to a _______ where their life and freedom are threatened. In reality, however, refugees are __________ the victims of ____________ and discriminatory treatment. They're increasingly obliged to rebuild their lives in the face of xenophobia and ______. And all too often, they aren't permitted to enter the work _____ and are fully dependent on humanitarian aid. In addition, far too many refugee children are out of school due to lack of funding for education programs. If you go back in your own family history, chances are you will discover that at a certain point, your ancestors were forced from their _____, either ________ a war or fleeing discrimination and persecution. It would be good of us to remember their _______ when we hear of refugees currently _________, searching for a new home.

Solution

  1. individual
  2. drafted
  3. governments
  4. recognized
  5. safety
  6. travel
  7. sexual
  8. force
  9. frequently
  10. flees
  11. millennia
  12. circumstances
  13. separation
  14. attempt
  15. child
  16. refugee
  17. integration
  18. means
  19. displaced
  20. large
  21. searching
  22. search
  23. safely
  24. stories
  25. difference
  26. relating
  27. countries
  28. situation
  29. deciding
  30. loved
  31. homes
  32. conflict
  33. nationality
  34. inconsistent
  35. factors
  36. refugees
  37. hopes
  38. camps
  39. agree
  40. escaping
  41. fleeing
  42. country
  43. entrust
  44. undergo
  45. racism

Original Text

Around the globe, there are approximately 60 million people who have been forced to leave their homes to escape war, violence, and persecution. The majority of them have become internally displaced persons, which means they have fled their homes but are still within their own countries. Others have crossed a border and sought shelter outside of their own countries. They are commonly referred to as refugees. But what exactly does that term mean? The world has known refugees for millennia, but the modern definition was drafted in the UN's 1951 Convention relating to the status of refugees in response to mass persecutions and displacements of the Second World War. It defines a refugee as someone who is outside their country of nationality, and is unable to return to their home country because of well-founded fears of being persecuted. That persecution may be due to their race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion, and is often related to war and violence. Today, roughly half the world's refugees are children, some of them unaccompanied by an adult, a situation that makes them especially vulnerable to child labor or sexual exploitation. Each refugee's story is different, and many must undergo dangerous journeys with uncertain outcomes. But before we get to what their journeys involve, let's clear one thing up. There's a lot of confusion regarding the difference between the terms "migrant" and "refugee." "Migrants" usually refers to people who leave their country for reasons not related to persecution, such as searching for better economic opportunities or leaving drought-stricken areas in search of better circumstances. There are many people around the world who have been displaced because of natural disasters, food insecurities, and other hardships, but international law, rightly or wrongly, only recognizes those fleeing conflict and violence as refugees. So what happens when someone flees their country? Most refugee journeys are long and perilous with limited access to shelter, water, or food. Since the departure can be sudden and unexpected, belongings might be left behind, and people who are evading conflict often do not have the required documents, like visas, to board airplanes and legally enter other countries. Financial and political factors can also prevent them from traveling by standard routes. This means they can usually only travel by land or sea, and may need to entrust their lives to smugglers to help them cross borders. Whereas some people seek safety with their families, others attempt passage alone and leave their loved ones behind with the hopes of being reunited later. This separation can be traumatic and unbearably long. While more than half the world's refugees are in cities, sometimes the first stop for a person fleeing conflict is a refugee camp, usually run by the United Nations Refugee Agency or local governments. Refugee camps are intended to be temporary structures, offering short-term shelter until inhabitants can safely return home, be integrated to the host country, or resettle in another country. But resettlement and long-term integration options are often limited. So many refugees are left with no choice but to remain in camps for years and sometimes even decades. Once in a new country, the first legal step for a displaced person is to apply for asylum. At this point, they are an asylum seeker and not officially recognized as a refugee until the application has been accepted. While countries by and large agree on one definition of refugee, every host country is responsible for examining all requests for asylum and deciding whether applicants can be granted the status of refugee. Different countries guidelines can vary substantially. Host countries have several duties towards people they have recognized as refugees, like the guarantee of a minimum standard of treatment and non-discrimination. The most basic obligation towards refugees is non-refoulement, a principle preventing a nation from sending an individual to a country where their life and freedom are threatened. In reality, however, refugees are frequently the victims of inconsistent and discriminatory treatment. They're increasingly obliged to rebuild their lives in the face of xenophobia and racism. And all too often, they aren't permitted to enter the work force and are fully dependent on humanitarian aid. In addition, far too many refugee children are out of school due to lack of funding for education programs. If you go back in your own family history, chances are you will discover that at a certain point, your ancestors were forced from their homes, either escaping a war or fleeing discrimination and persecution. It would be good of us to remember their stories when we hear of refugees currently displaced, searching for a new home.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
fleeing conflict 2

Important Words

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