full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Rishi Manchanda: What makes us get sick? Look upstream"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

The honest aneswr is that in healthcare, we often taert symptoms without addressing the coondniits that make you sick in the first palce. And there are many reasons for that, but the big three are first, we don't pay for that. In healthcare, we often pay for volume and not value. We pay dtorcos and hospitals usually for the number of secevris they provide, but not necessarily on how healthy they make you. That leads to a second phenomenon that I call the "don't ask, don't tell" approach to upstream issues in hrtalahece. We don't ask about where you live and where you work, because if there's a problem there, we don't know what to tell you. It's not that doctors don't know these are important issues. In a recent survey done in the U.S. among psyiahicns, over 1,000 physicians, 80 percent of them actually said that they know that their patients' urpsaetm problems are as important as their health issues, as their medical problems, and yet despite that widespread awareness of the importance of upstream issues, only one in five doctors said they had any sense of confidence to address those issues, to improve health where it begins. There's this gap between knowing that patients' lives, the contxet of where they live and work, maetrts, and the ability to do something about it in the systems in which we work.

Open Cloze

The honest ______ is that in healthcare, we often _____ symptoms without addressing the __________ that make you sick in the first _____. And there are many reasons for that, but the big three are first, we don't pay for that. In healthcare, we often pay for volume and not value. We pay _______ and hospitals usually for the number of ________ they provide, but not necessarily on how healthy they make you. That leads to a second phenomenon that I call the "don't ask, don't tell" approach to upstream issues in __________. We don't ask about where you live and where you work, because if there's a problem there, we don't know what to tell you. It's not that doctors don't know these are important issues. In a recent survey done in the U.S. among __________, over 1,000 physicians, 80 percent of them actually said that they know that their patients' ________ problems are as important as their health issues, as their medical problems, and yet despite that widespread awareness of the importance of upstream issues, only one in five doctors said they had any sense of confidence to address those issues, to improve health where it begins. There's this gap between knowing that patients' lives, the _______ of where they live and work, _______, and the ability to do something about it in the systems in which we work.

Solution

  1. answer
  2. physicians
  3. conditions
  4. context
  5. services
  6. upstream
  7. treat
  8. doctors
  9. healthcare
  10. place
  11. matters

Original Text

The honest answer is that in healthcare, we often treat symptoms without addressing the conditions that make you sick in the first place. And there are many reasons for that, but the big three are first, we don't pay for that. In healthcare, we often pay for volume and not value. We pay doctors and hospitals usually for the number of services they provide, but not necessarily on how healthy they make you. That leads to a second phenomenon that I call the "don't ask, don't tell" approach to upstream issues in healthcare. We don't ask about where you live and where you work, because if there's a problem there, we don't know what to tell you. It's not that doctors don't know these are important issues. In a recent survey done in the U.S. among physicians, over 1,000 physicians, 80 percent of them actually said that they know that their patients' upstream problems are as important as their health issues, as their medical problems, and yet despite that widespread awareness of the importance of upstream issues, only one in five doctors said they had any sense of confidence to address those issues, to improve health where it begins. There's this gap between knowing that patients' lives, the context of where they live and work, matters, and the ability to do something about it in the systems in which we work.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
healthcare system 7
los angeles 6
working conditions 6
improve health 4
emergency room 4
public health 4
health begins 3
water leaks 3
upstream approach 3
genetic code 3
heart disease 3
upstream issues 3

Important Words

  1. ability
  2. address
  3. addressing
  4. answer
  5. approach
  6. awareness
  7. begins
  8. big
  9. call
  10. conditions
  11. confidence
  12. context
  13. doctors
  14. gap
  15. health
  16. healthcare
  17. healthy
  18. honest
  19. hospitals
  20. importance
  21. important
  22. improve
  23. issues
  24. knowing
  25. leads
  26. live
  27. lives
  28. matters
  29. medical
  30. necessarily
  31. number
  32. pay
  33. percent
  34. phenomenon
  35. physicians
  36. place
  37. problem
  38. problems
  39. provide
  40. reasons
  41. sense
  42. services
  43. sick
  44. survey
  45. symptoms
  46. systems
  47. treat
  48. upstream
  49. volume
  50. widespread
  51. work