full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Rishi Manchanda: What makes us get sick? Look upstream

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Let me give you an example of what this flees like. Let's say there was a conpmay, a tech startup that came to you and said, "We have a graet product. It's going to lower your risk of death from heart disease." Now, you might be likely to invest if that product was a drug or a device, but what if that podcrut was a park? A study in the U.K., a landmark study that reviewed the redcors of over 40 molliin residents in the U.K., looked at several variables, controlled for a lot of factors, and found that when trying to adjust the risk of heart disease, one's exposure to green sacpe was a pofwurel influence. The closer you were to green space, to pkars and trees, the lower your chance of haert disease, and that stayed true for rich and for poor. That study illustrates what my friends in pibulc health often say these days: that one's zip code matters more than your genetic code. We're also learning that zip code is actually shaping our genetic code. The science of epigenetics looks at those molecular mechanisms, those intricate ways in which our DNA is literally spehad, genes turned on and off based on the exposures to the environment, to where we live and to where we work. So it's clear that these factors, these upstream iessus, do matter. They matter to our htaelh, and therefore our healthcare piofenaosrlss should do something about it. And yet, Veronica asked me perhaps the most compelling question I've been aeksd in a long time. In that follow-up visit, she said, "Why did none of my doctors ask about my home before? In those visits to the emergency room, I had two CAT scans, I had a ndeele placed in the lower part of my back to clcleot spinal fluid, I had nearly a dozen blood tests. I went back and forth, I saw all sorts of people in healthcare, and no one asked about my home."

Open Cloze

Let me give you an example of what this _____ like. Let's say there was a _______, a tech startup that came to you and said, "We have a _____ product. It's going to lower your risk of death from heart disease." Now, you might be likely to invest if that product was a drug or a device, but what if that _______ was a park? A study in the U.K., a landmark study that reviewed the _______ of over 40 _______ residents in the U.K., looked at several variables, controlled for a lot of factors, and found that when trying to adjust the risk of heart disease, one's exposure to green _____ was a ________ influence. The closer you were to green space, to _____ and trees, the lower your chance of _____ disease, and that stayed true for rich and for poor. That study illustrates what my friends in ______ health often say these days: that one's zip code matters more than your genetic code. We're also learning that zip code is actually shaping our genetic code. The science of epigenetics looks at those molecular mechanisms, those intricate ways in which our DNA is literally ______, genes turned on and off based on the exposures to the environment, to where we live and to where we work. So it's clear that these factors, these upstream ______, do matter. They matter to our ______, and therefore our healthcare _____________ should do something about it. And yet, Veronica asked me perhaps the most compelling question I've been _____ in a long time. In that follow-up visit, she said, "Why did none of my doctors ask about my home before? In those visits to the emergency room, I had two CAT scans, I had a ______ placed in the lower part of my back to _______ spinal fluid, I had nearly a dozen blood tests. I went back and forth, I saw all sorts of people in healthcare, and no one asked about my home."

Solution

  1. records
  2. shaped
  3. professionals
  4. collect
  5. needle
  6. asked
  7. great
  8. space
  9. issues
  10. public
  11. feels
  12. parks
  13. product
  14. million
  15. powerful
  16. heart
  17. company
  18. health

Original Text

Let me give you an example of what this feels like. Let's say there was a company, a tech startup that came to you and said, "We have a great product. It's going to lower your risk of death from heart disease." Now, you might be likely to invest if that product was a drug or a device, but what if that product was a park? A study in the U.K., a landmark study that reviewed the records of over 40 million residents in the U.K., looked at several variables, controlled for a lot of factors, and found that when trying to adjust the risk of heart disease, one's exposure to green space was a powerful influence. The closer you were to green space, to parks and trees, the lower your chance of heart disease, and that stayed true for rich and for poor. That study illustrates what my friends in public health often say these days: that one's zip code matters more than your genetic code. We're also learning that zip code is actually shaping our genetic code. The science of epigenetics looks at those molecular mechanisms, those intricate ways in which our DNA is literally shaped, genes turned on and off based on the exposures to the environment, to where we live and to where we work. So it's clear that these factors, these upstream issues, do matter. They matter to our health, and therefore our healthcare professionals should do something about it. And yet, Veronica asked me perhaps the most compelling question I've been asked in a long time. In that follow-up visit, she said, "Why did none of my doctors ask about my home before? In those visits to the emergency room, I had two CAT scans, I had a needle placed in the lower part of my back to collect spinal fluid, I had nearly a dozen blood tests. I went back and forth, I saw all sorts of people in healthcare, and no one asked about my home."

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
healthcare system 7
los angeles 5
working conditions 5
improve health 4
emergency room 3
public health 3
health begins 2
south central 2
central los 2
primary care 2
community health 2
upstream approach 2
health care 2
zip code 2
genetic code 2
compelling question 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
south central los 2

Important Words

  1. adjust
  2. asked
  3. based
  4. blood
  5. cat
  6. chance
  7. clear
  8. closer
  9. code
  10. collect
  11. company
  12. compelling
  13. controlled
  14. death
  15. device
  16. disease
  17. dna
  18. doctors
  19. dozen
  20. drug
  21. emergency
  22. environment
  23. epigenetics
  24. exposure
  25. exposures
  26. factors
  27. feels
  28. fluid
  29. friends
  30. genes
  31. genetic
  32. give
  33. great
  34. green
  35. health
  36. healthcare
  37. heart
  38. home
  39. illustrates
  40. influence
  41. intricate
  42. invest
  43. issues
  44. landmark
  45. learning
  46. literally
  47. live
  48. long
  49. looked
  50. lot
  51. matter
  52. matters
  53. mechanisms
  54. million
  55. molecular
  56. needle
  57. park
  58. parks
  59. part
  60. people
  61. poor
  62. powerful
  63. product
  64. professionals
  65. public
  66. question
  67. records
  68. residents
  69. reviewed
  70. rich
  71. risk
  72. room
  73. scans
  74. science
  75. shaped
  76. shaping
  77. sorts
  78. space
  79. spinal
  80. startup
  81. stayed
  82. study
  83. tech
  84. tests
  85. time
  86. trees
  87. true
  88. turned
  89. upstream
  90. variables
  91. veronica
  92. visit
  93. visits
  94. ways
  95. work
  96. zip