full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Andrew Connolly: What's the next window into our universe?

Unscramble the Blue Letters

But first, I want to show you how telohcngoy is going to cagnhe the way we view the sky. So imagine if you were sitting in the mountains of northern chlie looking out to the west towards the Pacific Ocean a few hours before sunrise. This is the view of the night sky that you would see, and it's a beautiful view, with the mlkiy Way just peeking out over the horizon. but it's also a static view, and in many ways, this is the way we think of our universe: eternal and unchanging. But the universe is anything but saittc. It constantly changes on timescales of seconds to billions of years. Galaxies mgree, they collide at hundreds of thousands of mlies per hour. Stars are born, they die, they explode in these extravagant displays. In fact, if we could go back to our tranquil skeis above Chile, and we allow time to move forward to see how the sky might change over the next year, the pulsations that you see are supernovae, the fianl remnants of a dying star exploding, brightening and then fndiag from view, each one of these supernovae five blloiin tiems the brightness of our sun, so we can see them to great distances but only for a short amount of time. Ten supernova per second explode somewhere in our universe. If we could hear it, it would be popping like a bag of popcorn. Now, if we fade out the supernovae, it's not just brightness that changes. Our sky is in conntast motion. This swarm of objects you see streaming across the sky are asteroids as they orbit our sun, and it's these changes and the mootin and it's the dynamics of the sysetm that allow us to bliud our models for our universe, to predict its future and to explain its past.

Open Cloze

But first, I want to show you how __________ is going to ______ the way we view the sky. So imagine if you were sitting in the mountains of northern _____ looking out to the west towards the Pacific Ocean a few hours before sunrise. This is the view of the night sky that you would see, and it's a beautiful view, with the _____ Way just peeking out over the horizon. but it's also a static view, and in many ways, this is the way we think of our universe: eternal and unchanging. But the universe is anything but ______. It constantly changes on timescales of seconds to billions of years. Galaxies _____, they collide at hundreds of thousands of _____ per hour. Stars are born, they die, they explode in these extravagant displays. In fact, if we could go back to our tranquil _____ above Chile, and we allow time to move forward to see how the sky might change over the next year, the pulsations that you see are supernovae, the _____ remnants of a dying star exploding, brightening and then ______ from view, each one of these supernovae five _______ _____ the brightness of our sun, so we can see them to great distances but only for a short amount of time. Ten supernova per second explode somewhere in our universe. If we could hear it, it would be popping like a bag of popcorn. Now, if we fade out the supernovae, it's not just brightness that changes. Our sky is in ________ motion. This swarm of objects you see streaming across the sky are asteroids as they orbit our sun, and it's these changes and the ______ and it's the dynamics of the ______ that allow us to _____ our models for our universe, to predict its future and to explain its past.

Solution

  1. skies
  2. miles
  3. technology
  4. constant
  5. motion
  6. system
  7. milky
  8. merge
  9. static
  10. times
  11. build
  12. chile
  13. fading
  14. final
  15. change
  16. billion

Original Text

But first, I want to show you how technology is going to change the way we view the sky. So imagine if you were sitting in the mountains of northern Chile looking out to the west towards the Pacific Ocean a few hours before sunrise. This is the view of the night sky that you would see, and it's a beautiful view, with the Milky Way just peeking out over the horizon. but it's also a static view, and in many ways, this is the way we think of our universe: eternal and unchanging. But the universe is anything but static. It constantly changes on timescales of seconds to billions of years. Galaxies merge, they collide at hundreds of thousands of miles per hour. Stars are born, they die, they explode in these extravagant displays. In fact, if we could go back to our tranquil skies above Chile, and we allow time to move forward to see how the sky might change over the next year, the pulsations that you see are supernovae, the final remnants of a dying star exploding, brightening and then fading from view, each one of these supernovae five billion times the brightness of our sun, so we can see them to great distances but only for a short amount of time. Ten supernova per second explode somewhere in our universe. If we could hear it, it would be popping like a bag of popcorn. Now, if we fade out the supernovae, it's not just brightness that changes. Our sky is in constant motion. This swarm of objects you see streaming across the sky are asteroids as they orbit our sun, and it's these changes and the motion and it's the dynamics of the system that allow us to build our models for our universe, to predict its future and to explain its past.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
dark energy 10
solar system 6
astronomer called 2
hubble space 2
earlier time 2
give rise 2

Important Words

  1. amount
  2. asteroids
  3. bag
  4. beautiful
  5. billion
  6. billions
  7. born
  8. brightening
  9. brightness
  10. build
  11. change
  12. chile
  13. collide
  14. constant
  15. constantly
  16. die
  17. displays
  18. distances
  19. dying
  20. dynamics
  21. eternal
  22. explain
  23. explode
  24. exploding
  25. extravagant
  26. fact
  27. fade
  28. fading
  29. final
  30. future
  31. galaxies
  32. great
  33. hear
  34. horizon
  35. hour
  36. hours
  37. hundreds
  38. imagine
  39. merge
  40. miles
  41. milky
  42. models
  43. motion
  44. mountains
  45. move
  46. night
  47. northern
  48. objects
  49. ocean
  50. orbit
  51. pacific
  52. peeking
  53. popcorn
  54. popping
  55. predict
  56. pulsations
  57. remnants
  58. seconds
  59. short
  60. show
  61. sitting
  62. skies
  63. sky
  64. star
  65. stars
  66. static
  67. streaming
  68. sun
  69. sunrise
  70. supernova
  71. supernovae
  72. swarm
  73. system
  74. technology
  75. ten
  76. thousands
  77. time
  78. times
  79. timescales
  80. tranquil
  81. unchanging
  82. universe
  83. view
  84. ways
  85. west
  86. year
  87. years