full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Harald Eia: Where in the world is it easiest to get rich?

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Where in the wlord is it easiest to get ... rich? That's the question I asked my professor when I studied sociology in the early 90s because he was having a lecture about social democracies, the savdiicnnaan welfare state, and he was a classical left-wing sloooicgy professor, and he could not hide his enthusiasm when he talked about these etialaigran societies with no rich people and no poor people. But I, on the other hand, I was winitrg my master's thesis about rich people. When I interviewed my informants from the upper classes, they all said the same thing: "Life in Scandinavia is tgouh." (Laughter) "We have to work twice as hard to earn mnoey because we have to sglgture against: high taxes, sotnrg unions controlling the wages and a generous welfare state that makes peolpe lazy." As one rich guy told me, he said, "They call it a social security net. Well, I call it a hammock." (Laughter) And as every aspiring social scientist, I started to go native; I started to feel sympathy for these rich people. And that's why I raised my hand and asked my professor, "Well, what if you don't care so much about equality? What if your darem is to become rich? Where in the world should I have been born to become really rich?" I still remember the puzzled look on my professor's face. But he arneeswd the best he could. Something like, "Well, if that's your goal in life, you should probably have been born in a society with free markets, low teaxs, and minimal government intervention. And he aeddd, "If you want to become rich, you should probably not study sociology." (Laughter) That was a good answer and the best guess we had back then. That is until I saw that the uisvtienry of Oslo professor in Economy, Karl Moene, actually had checked the facts: "Where in the world is it easiest to get rich?" And before I share with you where you should go to earn money, we have to denfie "rich." The UN talks about the poverty line. You know, if you earn less than one daollr a day, maybe two dollars a day. But we have to define the richness line. It's a more fun line, actually. And the most relalbie report, when it comes to rich people, the Wealth rrpeot, they set the richness line at individuals with net worth more than 30 million USD. In the consultant jargon, these people are called UHNWI's. That is Ultra High Net Worth Individuals. That guy, by the way, is not rich. He is just a model. (Laughter) Actually, on the lower part of the model. (Laughter) And I have saved some money by kieenpg the watermark there as well. (Laughter) Smart. (Laughter) (Applause) So, according to The Wealth Report, there are more than 170, 000 UHNWI's in the world. And here is the top five list of countries with the richest people. Number five: China, with more than 8,000. UK, Germany, Japan, and on top, of course, the United stteas with more than 40,000 rich people. But of course, we are not iettsreend in the absolute numbers here. We are interested in rich people per capita, per million inhabitants. And if we leave out the pure tax havens, like Cyprus, and Switzerland, Hong Kong, Singapore, Monaco - where we have an artificially huge share of rich people - it turns out that we have on number 5 Denmark - with 179 rich people per one million inhabitants - Canada, New Zealand, Sweden and on top: Norway. (Laughter) But where's the US? On place 13. So what happened to my old professor's, you know, socail democracies? There are no rich people there. But OK. 30 million dollars, that's just pcekot money in a country like the US, where people can get insanely rich. (Laughter) Look at the wearrmtak again? (Laughter) So, let's raise the richness line up from 30 million dollars up to ... 1 billion dollars. And the most reliable source here is the Forbes billionaires list. And according to the Forbes, if you look at blilaeironis per moililn inhabitants. Number 5, Germany: 1.2 billionaires. 1.2 billionaires per million inhabitants. The United States 1.7, Norway 2, Sweden, and on top iaenlcd with 3.1 (Laughter) With a single billionaire: Thor Björgólfsson. (luehtagr) (aupsalpe) He could have been a model. (Laughter) But the point is, the United States: 1.7 sndniavciaa taken as a whole: 2.1 And the big mystery is ... How can this be? How can brniee Sanders' dream societies, these socialist paradises be such a breeding place for rich people? (Laughter) That's a mystery. (Laughter) There are two reasons. Reason number one is free education. Social demcoareics give free higher education to everybody, and cheap student loans, and gtnras. That enables more people to use their talents and earn money. We can see this in the social mobility numbers. imgiane all fathers in a society, and we divide them into five guoprs based on income: from the bottom fifth up to the top fifth. Then we look at their sons, and divide their iconme into five septs, and we see how many sons of the farhtes from the bottom income end up on top. How many sons go from rags to riches? If it was perfect social mobility, if talents and onittoeppiurs were equally dsiruteitbd, 20% from the bttoom would end up on each of these five ledadrs. So let's look at the numbers for the different countries. In Denmark, they are ptrety close to perfect social mobility with 14% that goes from rags to riches. In Norway 12, Sweden 11, the United States 8. Because of free education, there are more self-made men in Scandinavia than in the US. And if we look at those sons who don't end up on top but stay at the bottom, that go from rags to rags. Again, 20% would be perfect mobility. In Denmark, 25% ends up at the bottom, Sweden a bit more. Norway. And look at the United States. This is because education in the United States is very expensive. But the second and most important explanation for Scandinavia being such a breeding pcale for rich people is this: Have you ever noticed if you have been to the United States, when you drive around and dvrie through a toll plaza, there are actually people sitting there taking your money. Compare that to my local toll plzaa. (Laughter) Just a sign with some gizmo attached to it. And when you go to a supermarket in the uitned States, there are actually people there helping to pack your things into your bags. It's very friendly and convenient compared to my local gecorry srtoe. Like this. (Laughter) There's nobody there. (Laughter) The biggest shcok I had when I went to the US for the first time, when I went to the restroom, there were actually people wnkirog there. Compare that to my lcoal public toilet. (Laughter) There's not even a cleaner there; it claens itself aotialltcmauy. And the rasoen for this difference is that Scandinavian unions are pressing up the minimum wages. It's so expensive to have these people working there. In Norway, tollbooth operators, skruarpmeet packers, and a rroetsom janitor would earn almost three times as much as in the US. And that's why we have replaced these people with machines. That is why I was surprised when I saw this article in The New York Times in 2014. paenpirrg for Chip-and-PIN Cards in the United States. (Laughter) Because in the United States people are still using paepr checks as a mehotd of payment, while Scandinavian banks have made us satrt using Chip-and-PIN cdras long ago. Because the minimum wages here are so high. So Scandinavian bnaks can't afford having people manually control the checks. So Scandinavian companies, because of the unions pressing up the wages, they have to downsize and introduce new technology or else ... they will go bkore. And new technology ineesarcs the productivity in a society, which in the long run also increases profit. And on the upper end of the wage ladder, in the name of solidarity, Scandinavian unions hold back the highest sileraas of the skilled weorkrs. So for example, a Norwegian senior engineer - it's my uncle, by the way. (Laughter) That's why there's no watermark there. (Laughter) Actually, he would look cooler with a watermark, better. (Laughter) He enars, on average per year, 76,000 dollars, while his American colleague earns more than 100,000 dollars. So American engineers ... (Laughter) They are not only more good-looking, but they are more expensive. Of course, this wage restraint on high-skilled work is good for profit. So, the unions are in eecfft sdiiibznusg the capitalists. I wish I knew all this when I gave up a ceearr in social sccenie because the beauty and the irony of these findings, I think, is amazing. On the one hand, you have my rich informants that complain about how hard it is to get rich in Scandinavia. They had it all wrong. Not only is it easier to get rich in a social democracy, but they are critical to the very institutions that have helped them get rich. High taxes, which gives free education and more talent into the economy. Strong unions that are helping to iercnsae piitucrdvtoy, and a generous welfare state that makes the uinons acpcet downsizing because they know that their members will be well taken care of. So the unions cooperate because of the safety net. So rich people are a bit like Immanuel Kant's famous bird, who thinks she could fly even fteasr in airless sacpe, forgetting that it's the air itself that gives her lift. On the other part of the political spectrum, when Bernie Sanders is praising Scandinavian societies, he forgets that these are not anti-rich or anti-capitalist systems. Because the welfare satte and the unions work in tandem with capitalist dynamics. And I think that is the most important lesson here. The encmooy is not a zero-sum game. We are in this together. And that is why Scandinavia is a better place to fulfill the American dream ... (Laughter) than America itself. Thank you so much. (Applause) (Cheering)

Open Cloze

Where in the _____ is it easiest to get ... rich? That's the question I asked my professor when I studied sociology in the early 90s because he was having a lecture about social democracies, the ____________ welfare state, and he was a classical left-wing _________ professor, and he could not hide his enthusiasm when he talked about these ___________ societies with no rich people and no poor people. But I, on the other hand, I was _______ my master's thesis about rich people. When I interviewed my informants from the upper classes, they all said the same thing: "Life in Scandinavia is _____." (Laughter) "We have to work twice as hard to earn _____ because we have to ________ against: high taxes, ______ unions controlling the wages and a generous welfare state that makes ______ lazy." As one rich guy told me, he said, "They call it a social security net. Well, I call it a hammock." (Laughter) And as every aspiring social scientist, I started to go native; I started to feel sympathy for these rich people. And that's why I raised my hand and asked my professor, "Well, what if you don't care so much about equality? What if your _____ is to become rich? Where in the world should I have been born to become really rich?" I still remember the puzzled look on my professor's face. But he ________ the best he could. Something like, "Well, if that's your goal in life, you should probably have been born in a society with free markets, low _____, and minimal government intervention. And he _____, "If you want to become rich, you should probably not study sociology." (Laughter) That was a good answer and the best guess we had back then. That is until I saw that the __________ of Oslo professor in Economy, Karl Moene, actually had checked the facts: "Where in the world is it easiest to get rich?" And before I share with you where you should go to earn money, we have to ______ "rich." The UN talks about the poverty line. You know, if you earn less than one ______ a day, maybe two dollars a day. But we have to define the richness line. It's a more fun line, actually. And the most ________ report, when it comes to rich people, the Wealth ______, they set the richness line at individuals with net worth more than 30 million USD. In the consultant jargon, these people are called UHNWI's. That is Ultra High Net Worth Individuals. That guy, by the way, is not rich. He is just a model. (Laughter) Actually, on the lower part of the model. (Laughter) And I have saved some money by _______ the watermark there as well. (Laughter) Smart. (Laughter) (Applause) So, according to The Wealth Report, there are more than 170, 000 UHNWI's in the world. And here is the top five list of countries with the richest people. Number five: China, with more than 8,000. UK, Germany, Japan, and on top, of course, the United ______ with more than 40,000 rich people. But of course, we are not __________ in the absolute numbers here. We are interested in rich people per capita, per million inhabitants. And if we leave out the pure tax havens, like Cyprus, and Switzerland, Hong Kong, Singapore, Monaco - where we have an artificially huge share of rich people - it turns out that we have on number 5 Denmark - with 179 rich people per one million inhabitants - Canada, New Zealand, Sweden and on top: Norway. (Laughter) But where's the US? On place 13. So what happened to my old professor's, you know, ______ democracies? There are no rich people there. But OK. 30 million dollars, that's just ______ money in a country like the US, where people can get insanely rich. (Laughter) Look at the _________ again? (Laughter) So, let's raise the richness line up from 30 million dollars up to ... 1 billion dollars. And the most reliable source here is the Forbes billionaires list. And according to the Forbes, if you look at ____________ per _______ inhabitants. Number 5, Germany: 1.2 billionaires. 1.2 billionaires per million inhabitants. The United States 1.7, Norway 2, Sweden, and on top _______ with 3.1 (Laughter) With a single billionaire: Thor Björgólfsson. (________) (________) He could have been a model. (Laughter) But the point is, the United States: 1.7 ___________ taken as a whole: 2.1 And the big mystery is ... How can this be? How can ______ Sanders' dream societies, these socialist paradises be such a breeding place for rich people? (Laughter) That's a mystery. (Laughter) There are two reasons. Reason number one is free education. Social ___________ give free higher education to everybody, and cheap student loans, and ______. That enables more people to use their talents and earn money. We can see this in the social mobility numbers. _______ all fathers in a society, and we divide them into five ______ based on income: from the bottom fifth up to the top fifth. Then we look at their sons, and divide their ______ into five _____, and we see how many sons of the _______ from the bottom income end up on top. How many sons go from rags to riches? If it was perfect social mobility, if talents and _____________ were equally ___________, 20% from the ______ would end up on each of these five _______. So let's look at the numbers for the different countries. In Denmark, they are ______ close to perfect social mobility with 14% that goes from rags to riches. In Norway 12, Sweden 11, the United States 8. Because of free education, there are more self-made men in Scandinavia than in the US. And if we look at those sons who don't end up on top but stay at the bottom, that go from rags to rags. Again, 20% would be perfect mobility. In Denmark, 25% ends up at the bottom, Sweden a bit more. Norway. And look at the United States. This is because education in the United States is very expensive. But the second and most important explanation for Scandinavia being such a breeding _____ for rich people is this: Have you ever noticed if you have been to the United States, when you drive around and _____ through a toll plaza, there are actually people sitting there taking your money. Compare that to my local toll _____. (Laughter) Just a sign with some gizmo attached to it. And when you go to a supermarket in the ______ States, there are actually people there helping to pack your things into your bags. It's very friendly and convenient compared to my local _______ _____. Like this. (Laughter) There's nobody there. (Laughter) The biggest _____ I had when I went to the US for the first time, when I went to the restroom, there were actually people _______ there. Compare that to my _____ public toilet. (Laughter) There's not even a cleaner there; it ______ itself _____________. And the ______ for this difference is that Scandinavian unions are pressing up the minimum wages. It's so expensive to have these people working there. In Norway, tollbooth operators, ___________ packers, and a ________ janitor would earn almost three times as much as in the US. And that's why we have replaced these people with machines. That is why I was surprised when I saw this article in The New York Times in 2014. _________ for Chip-and-PIN Cards in the United States. (Laughter) Because in the United States people are still using _____ checks as a ______ of payment, while Scandinavian banks have made us _____ using Chip-and-PIN _____ long ago. Because the minimum wages here are so high. So Scandinavian _____ can't afford having people manually control the checks. So Scandinavian companies, because of the unions pressing up the wages, they have to downsize and introduce new technology or else ... they will go _____. And new technology _________ the productivity in a society, which in the long run also increases profit. And on the upper end of the wage ladder, in the name of solidarity, Scandinavian unions hold back the highest ________ of the skilled _______. So for example, a Norwegian senior engineer - it's my uncle, by the way. (Laughter) That's why there's no watermark there. (Laughter) Actually, he would look cooler with a watermark, better. (Laughter) He _____, on average per year, 76,000 dollars, while his American colleague earns more than 100,000 dollars. So American engineers ... (Laughter) They are not only more good-looking, but they are more expensive. Of course, this wage restraint on high-skilled work is good for profit. So, the unions are in ______ ___________ the capitalists. I wish I knew all this when I gave up a ______ in social _______ because the beauty and the irony of these findings, I think, is amazing. On the one hand, you have my rich informants that complain about how hard it is to get rich in Scandinavia. They had it all wrong. Not only is it easier to get rich in a social democracy, but they are critical to the very institutions that have helped them get rich. High taxes, which gives free education and more talent into the economy. Strong unions that are helping to ________ ____________, and a generous welfare state that makes the ______ ______ downsizing because they know that their members will be well taken care of. So the unions cooperate because of the safety net. So rich people are a bit like Immanuel Kant's famous bird, who thinks she could fly even ______ in airless _____, forgetting that it's the air itself that gives her lift. On the other part of the political spectrum, when Bernie Sanders is praising Scandinavian societies, he forgets that these are not anti-rich or anti-capitalist systems. Because the welfare _____ and the unions work in tandem with capitalist dynamics. And I think that is the most important lesson here. The _______ is not a zero-sum game. We are in this together. And that is why Scandinavia is a better place to fulfill the American dream ... (Laughter) than America itself. Thank you so much. (Applause) (Cheering)

Solution

  1. watermark
  2. distributed
  3. drive
  4. earns
  5. place
  6. tough
  7. effect
  8. scandinavian
  9. bernie
  10. writing
  11. ladders
  12. report
  13. grants
  14. people
  15. laughter
  16. added
  17. career
  18. bottom
  19. accept
  20. workers
  21. science
  22. social
  23. opportunities
  24. subsidizing
  25. united
  26. million
  27. imagine
  28. state
  29. applause
  30. pretty
  31. steps
  32. productivity
  33. cards
  34. money
  35. faster
  36. reason
  37. increase
  38. university
  39. start
  40. shock
  41. groups
  42. salaries
  43. unions
  44. struggle
  45. dollar
  46. taxes
  47. answered
  48. supermarket
  49. income
  50. economy
  51. states
  52. scandinavia
  53. automatically
  54. define
  55. banks
  56. dream
  57. democracies
  58. world
  59. keeping
  60. local
  61. interested
  62. reliable
  63. cleans
  64. grocery
  65. egalitarian
  66. billionaires
  67. paper
  68. preparing
  69. method
  70. strong
  71. plaza
  72. pocket
  73. restroom
  74. sociology
  75. broke
  76. fathers
  77. working
  78. iceland
  79. increases
  80. space
  81. store

Original Text

Where in the world is it easiest to get ... rich? That's the question I asked my professor when I studied sociology in the early 90s because he was having a lecture about social democracies, the Scandinavian welfare state, and he was a classical left-wing sociology professor, and he could not hide his enthusiasm when he talked about these egalitarian societies with no rich people and no poor people. But I, on the other hand, I was writing my master's thesis about rich people. When I interviewed my informants from the upper classes, they all said the same thing: "Life in Scandinavia is tough." (Laughter) "We have to work twice as hard to earn money because we have to struggle against: high taxes, strong unions controlling the wages and a generous welfare state that makes people lazy." As one rich guy told me, he said, "They call it a social security net. Well, I call it a hammock." (Laughter) And as every aspiring social scientist, I started to go native; I started to feel sympathy for these rich people. And that's why I raised my hand and asked my professor, "Well, what if you don't care so much about equality? What if your dream is to become rich? Where in the world should I have been born to become really rich?" I still remember the puzzled look on my professor's face. But he answered the best he could. Something like, "Well, if that's your goal in life, you should probably have been born in a society with free markets, low taxes, and minimal government intervention. And he added, "If you want to become rich, you should probably not study sociology." (Laughter) That was a good answer and the best guess we had back then. That is until I saw that the University of Oslo professor in Economy, Karl Moene, actually had checked the facts: "Where in the world is it easiest to get rich?" And before I share with you where you should go to earn money, we have to define "rich." The UN talks about the poverty line. You know, if you earn less than one dollar a day, maybe two dollars a day. But we have to define the richness line. It's a more fun line, actually. And the most reliable report, when it comes to rich people, the Wealth Report, they set the richness line at individuals with net worth more than 30 million USD. In the consultant jargon, these people are called UHNWI's. That is Ultra High Net Worth Individuals. That guy, by the way, is not rich. He is just a model. (Laughter) Actually, on the lower part of the model. (Laughter) And I have saved some money by keeping the watermark there as well. (Laughter) Smart. (Laughter) (Applause) So, according to The Wealth Report, there are more than 170, 000 UHNWI's in the world. And here is the top five list of countries with the richest people. Number five: China, with more than 8,000. UK, Germany, Japan, and on top, of course, the United States with more than 40,000 rich people. But of course, we are not interested in the absolute numbers here. We are interested in rich people per capita, per million inhabitants. And if we leave out the pure tax havens, like Cyprus, and Switzerland, Hong Kong, Singapore, Monaco - where we have an artificially huge share of rich people - it turns out that we have on number 5 Denmark - with 179 rich people per one million inhabitants - Canada, New Zealand, Sweden and on top: Norway. (Laughter) But where's the US? On place 13. So what happened to my old professor's, you know, social democracies? There are no rich people there. But OK. 30 million dollars, that's just pocket money in a country like the US, where people can get insanely rich. (Laughter) Look at the watermark again? (Laughter) So, let's raise the richness line up from 30 million dollars up to ... 1 billion dollars. And the most reliable source here is the Forbes billionaires list. And according to the Forbes, if you look at billionaires per million inhabitants. Number 5, Germany: 1.2 billionaires. 1.2 billionaires per million inhabitants. The United States 1.7, Norway 2, Sweden, and on top Iceland with 3.1 (Laughter) With a single billionaire: Thor Björgólfsson. (Laughter) (Applause) He could have been a model. (Laughter) But the point is, the United States: 1.7 Scandinavia taken as a whole: 2.1 And the big mystery is ... How can this be? How can Bernie Sanders' dream societies, these socialist paradises be such a breeding place for rich people? (Laughter) That's a mystery. (Laughter) There are two reasons. Reason number one is free education. Social democracies give free higher education to everybody, and cheap student loans, and grants. That enables more people to use their talents and earn money. We can see this in the social mobility numbers. Imagine all fathers in a society, and we divide them into five groups based on income: from the bottom fifth up to the top fifth. Then we look at their sons, and divide their income into five steps, and we see how many sons of the fathers from the bottom income end up on top. How many sons go from rags to riches? If it was perfect social mobility, if talents and opportunities were equally distributed, 20% from the bottom would end up on each of these five ladders. So let's look at the numbers for the different countries. In Denmark, they are pretty close to perfect social mobility with 14% that goes from rags to riches. In Norway 12, Sweden 11, the United States 8. Because of free education, there are more self-made men in Scandinavia than in the US. And if we look at those sons who don't end up on top but stay at the bottom, that go from rags to rags. Again, 20% would be perfect mobility. In Denmark, 25% ends up at the bottom, Sweden a bit more. Norway. And look at the United States. This is because education in the United States is very expensive. But the second and most important explanation for Scandinavia being such a breeding place for rich people is this: Have you ever noticed if you have been to the United States, when you drive around and drive through a toll plaza, there are actually people sitting there taking your money. Compare that to my local toll plaza. (Laughter) Just a sign with some gizmo attached to it. And when you go to a supermarket in the United States, there are actually people there helping to pack your things into your bags. It's very friendly and convenient compared to my local grocery store. Like this. (Laughter) There's nobody there. (Laughter) The biggest shock I had when I went to the US for the first time, when I went to the restroom, there were actually people working there. Compare that to my local public toilet. (Laughter) There's not even a cleaner there; it cleans itself automatically. And the reason for this difference is that Scandinavian unions are pressing up the minimum wages. It's so expensive to have these people working there. In Norway, tollbooth operators, supermarket packers, and a restroom janitor would earn almost three times as much as in the US. And that's why we have replaced these people with machines. That is why I was surprised when I saw this article in The New York Times in 2014. Preparing for Chip-and-PIN Cards in the United States. (Laughter) Because in the United States people are still using paper checks as a method of payment, while Scandinavian banks have made us start using Chip-and-PIN cards long ago. Because the minimum wages here are so high. So Scandinavian banks can't afford having people manually control the checks. So Scandinavian companies, because of the unions pressing up the wages, they have to downsize and introduce new technology or else ... they will go broke. And new technology increases the productivity in a society, which in the long run also increases profit. And on the upper end of the wage ladder, in the name of solidarity, Scandinavian unions hold back the highest salaries of the skilled workers. So for example, a Norwegian senior engineer - it's my uncle, by the way. (Laughter) That's why there's no watermark there. (Laughter) Actually, he would look cooler with a watermark, better. (Laughter) He earns, on average per year, 76,000 dollars, while his American colleague earns more than 100,000 dollars. So American engineers ... (Laughter) They are not only more good-looking, but they are more expensive. Of course, this wage restraint on high-skilled work is good for profit. So, the unions are in effect subsidizing the capitalists. I wish I knew all this when I gave up a career in social science because the beauty and the irony of these findings, I think, is amazing. On the one hand, you have my rich informants that complain about how hard it is to get rich in Scandinavia. They had it all wrong. Not only is it easier to get rich in a social democracy, but they are critical to the very institutions that have helped them get rich. High taxes, which gives free education and more talent into the economy. Strong unions that are helping to increase productivity, and a generous welfare state that makes the unions accept downsizing because they know that their members will be well taken care of. So the unions cooperate because of the safety net. So rich people are a bit like Immanuel Kant's famous bird, who thinks she could fly even faster in airless space, forgetting that it's the air itself that gives her lift. On the other part of the political spectrum, when Bernie Sanders is praising Scandinavian societies, he forgets that these are not anti-rich or anti-capitalist systems. Because the welfare state and the unions work in tandem with capitalist dynamics. And I think that is the most important lesson here. The economy is not a zero-sum game. We are in this together. And that is why Scandinavia is a better place to fulfill the American dream ... (Laughter) than America itself. Thank you so much. (Applause) (Cheering)

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
rich people 10
united states 7
million inhabitants 4
welfare state 3
richness line 3
earn money 2
strong unions 2
generous welfare 2
net worth 2
breeding place 2
free education 2
social mobility 2
perfect social 2
people working 2
scandinavian unions 2
minimum wages 2
scandinavian banks 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
generous welfare state 2

Important Words

  1. absolute
  2. accept
  3. added
  4. afford
  5. air
  6. airless
  7. amazing
  8. america
  9. american
  10. answer
  11. answered
  12. applause
  13. article
  14. artificially
  15. asked
  16. aspiring
  17. attached
  18. automatically
  19. average
  20. bags
  21. banks
  22. based
  23. beauty
  24. bernie
  25. big
  26. biggest
  27. billion
  28. billionaires
  29. bird
  30. bit
  31. björgólfsson
  32. born
  33. bottom
  34. breeding
  35. broke
  36. call
  37. called
  38. canada
  39. capita
  40. capitalist
  41. capitalists
  42. cards
  43. care
  44. career
  45. cheap
  46. checked
  47. checks
  48. cheering
  49. china
  50. classes
  51. classical
  52. cleaner
  53. cleans
  54. close
  55. colleague
  56. companies
  57. compare
  58. compared
  59. complain
  60. consultant
  61. control
  62. controlling
  63. convenient
  64. cooler
  65. cooperate
  66. countries
  67. country
  68. critical
  69. cyprus
  70. day
  71. define
  72. democracies
  73. democracy
  74. denmark
  75. difference
  76. distributed
  77. divide
  78. dollar
  79. dollars
  80. downsize
  81. downsizing
  82. dream
  83. drive
  84. dynamics
  85. early
  86. earn
  87. earns
  88. easier
  89. easiest
  90. economy
  91. education
  92. effect
  93. egalitarian
  94. enables
  95. ends
  96. engineer
  97. engineers
  98. enthusiasm
  99. equality
  100. equally
  101. expensive
  102. explanation
  103. face
  104. famous
  105. faster
  106. fathers
  107. feel
  108. findings
  109. fly
  110. forbes
  111. forgets
  112. forgetting
  113. free
  114. friendly
  115. fulfill
  116. fun
  117. game
  118. gave
  119. generous
  120. germany
  121. give
  122. gizmo
  123. goal
  124. good
  125. government
  126. grants
  127. grocery
  128. groups
  129. guess
  130. guy
  131. hammock
  132. hand
  133. happened
  134. hard
  135. havens
  136. helped
  137. helping
  138. hide
  139. high
  140. higher
  141. highest
  142. hold
  143. hong
  144. huge
  145. iceland
  146. imagine
  147. immanuel
  148. important
  149. income
  150. increase
  151. increases
  152. individuals
  153. informants
  154. inhabitants
  155. insanely
  156. institutions
  157. interested
  158. intervention
  159. interviewed
  160. introduce
  161. irony
  162. janitor
  163. japan
  164. jargon
  165. karl
  166. keeping
  167. knew
  168. kong
  169. ladder
  170. ladders
  171. laughter
  172. lazy
  173. leave
  174. lecture
  175. lesson
  176. life
  177. lift
  178. line
  179. list
  180. loans
  181. local
  182. long
  183. machines
  184. manually
  185. markets
  186. members
  187. men
  188. method
  189. million
  190. minimal
  191. minimum
  192. mobility
  193. model
  194. moene
  195. monaco
  196. money
  197. mystery
  198. net
  199. norway
  200. norwegian
  201. noticed
  202. number
  203. numbers
  204. operators
  205. opportunities
  206. oslo
  207. pack
  208. packers
  209. paper
  210. paradises
  211. part
  212. payment
  213. people
  214. perfect
  215. place
  216. plaza
  217. pocket
  218. point
  219. political
  220. poor
  221. poverty
  222. praising
  223. preparing
  224. pressing
  225. pretty
  226. productivity
  227. professor
  228. profit
  229. public
  230. pure
  231. puzzled
  232. question
  233. rags
  234. raise
  235. raised
  236. reason
  237. reasons
  238. reliable
  239. remember
  240. replaced
  241. report
  242. restraint
  243. restroom
  244. rich
  245. riches
  246. richest
  247. richness
  248. run
  249. safety
  250. salaries
  251. sanders
  252. saved
  253. scandinavia
  254. scandinavian
  255. science
  256. scientist
  257. security
  258. senior
  259. set
  260. share
  261. shock
  262. sign
  263. singapore
  264. single
  265. sitting
  266. skilled
  267. smart
  268. social
  269. socialist
  270. societies
  271. society
  272. sociology
  273. solidarity
  274. sons
  275. source
  276. space
  277. spectrum
  278. start
  279. started
  280. state
  281. states
  282. stay
  283. steps
  284. store
  285. strong
  286. struggle
  287. student
  288. studied
  289. study
  290. subsidizing
  291. supermarket
  292. surprised
  293. sweden
  294. switzerland
  295. sympathy
  296. systems
  297. talent
  298. talents
  299. talked
  300. talks
  301. tandem
  302. tax
  303. taxes
  304. technology
  305. thesis
  306. thinks
  307. thor
  308. time
  309. times
  310. toilet
  311. told
  312. toll
  313. tollbooth
  314. top
  315. tough
  316. turns
  317. uk
  318. ultra
  319. uncle
  320. unions
  321. united
  322. university
  323. upper
  324. usd
  325. wage
  326. wages
  327. watermark
  328. wealth
  329. welfare
  330. work
  331. workers
  332. working
  333. world
  334. worth
  335. writing
  336. wrong
  337. year
  338. york
  339. zealand