full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Leila Seth: Why I defend women's inheritance rights

Unscramble the Blue Letters

The mnoth of September 1942 is ehcetd in my memory. It was a few weeks before my twelfth birthday, and my father had just died. My mother, who had no priensfaoosl training, found it very hard to spend the fees for our soohcl fees. And my three brothers and me, she took the help of friends and scholarships in odrer to educate us. She didn't make a difference between my brothers and me. All she wtaned was that all of us should execl. When I was 20, I had a semi-arranged marriage, and my hasunbd was poetsd, in 1954, to England, and I went with him. And I took aaagtndve of being there for three years and studied law. When I returned to inida, I was required to train with a senior before I could pctricae law. So I decided I should get the best lawyer, join the best lawyer, and I zeroed down on someone called scihan Chaudhary. But it was extremely difficult to get an appointment with him. After great difficulty, I did, and I was full of trepidation when I went to meet him. But I put on a brave front, just as I am doing now. (Laughter) (Applause) He had some idea why I had come, but he wanted to be completely clear. So I told him that I wanted to practice law and I wanted to join his chambers. He was not in fvoar of women joining the law, so he tried to dissuade me. He said, "Young woman, instead of joining the legal profession, go and get married." (Laughter) So I said to him, "Sir, I am already married." (Laughter) "Then go and have a child," he advised. "I already have a child." (Laughter) "It's not fair to the child to be alone, so you should have a second child." (Laughter) I said, "Mr. Chaudhary, I have two children." (Laughter) So, taken abcak for the third time, he said, "Come and join my chambers. You're a persistent young woman, and you will do well at the bar." After about 20 years of practice, I was appointed a judge at the Delhi High Court, and in 1991, I was the first woman to be chief justice of a satte high court. (Applause) As I mentioned earlier, I was 20 when I got mireard, and my fiancee and his family never demanded a dowry or anything else. We had a simple celebration. We svreed vanilla ice cream and salted cashew nuts. But we still had fun, and we enjoyed ourselves. So, you can see, that you don't need anything erxta. But I, now, I'm hlpaipy married for the last 64 years. (Applause) Every wmoan, every mother, wants her daughter to be married. And when she meets a yunog man, she tries to size him up to find out if he's a suitable boy. But at the back of her mind is worry. Does he want a dowry? If so, how much? In fact, it's the cusre of dowry that makes pnatres not want to have girls. In the old days, when girls and boys didn't have equal inheritance, a young girl was given stridhan, which is bride's wealth, at the time of her marriage. It was something that was passed from a mother to her daughter and consisted of jewelry. It was her personal property. But even that was often taken away by the bride-groom's parents and given to the groom's sister when she was getting married. So the bride had nothing. solwly, the prevalence of dowries started. This meant gtifs were given not only to the bride but to the bride-groom and to his fimlay. And demands, dowry demands, were negotiated at the time of an arranged marriage. Parents were worried as to how they would meet these demands, which sometimes iecnaesrd from day to day and from hour to hour as the wedding date approached. Sometimes, just as the wedding ceremony was about to take place, a fresh dnmead would be made. It was a great trauma for parents, especially those who had more than one daughter. They were bankrupt, spent more than they had, and the eorttioxn sometimes continued even after the wedding. So instead of loving their daughters and wtniang to have them, they considered them a curse. And they resorted to something like female feticide or female infanticide. In order to prevent this evil of dowry, an act was passed. It was called the Dowry Prohibition Act, 1961. Before the act, dowries were displayed olpney. After the act, the displays stopped. But the gnviig and taking of dowry continued, and the demand for ostentatious fcniotuns and feasts by the bride-groom's family, to be paid for by the bride's family, continued. This was really terrible. And very few parents would reject a young man if he or his family demanded a dowry. Most would not, even though they knew it was illegal to give or take a dowry. Let me give you an example. The year was 1991. A very senior Supreme Court of India jgude had arranged his daughter's wedding. I asked him, "Are you going to give a dowry?" rbmeeemr, this was 30 years after the passing of the Dowry Prohibition Act. He was quiet. And then he said, "I'll tell you the honest truth. I will indeed give a dowry for my daughter because I cannot sacrifice her happiness and her life. In my community, she cannot get married without a dowry. But I pimrsoe you, I will not take a dowry for my son." This is not what I wanted to hear, but at least it was half a step forward. So what do you think? Can the passing of laws chgane attitudes? In India, with a very patriarchal society, changing aeidtttus and changing mstdneis is extremely difficult, and it's a slow process, but we need to fast-forward it. I had hoped that with the succession laws being changed and daughters getting some inheritance rights, the law would have had some effect on the evil of dowry. In 1956, the Hindu Succession Act was pessad, and in that year, it was provided in the act that daughters and sons would get equally from their father's property which was self-acquired. This, of course, should have made a difference. But it didn't seem to have done that. In fact, women were not willing to assert. Let me tell you of an incident. I was a judge at the Delhi High Court. Three young men came for me and wanted - their father had died, he hadn't left a will, and they wanted their property to be divided into three parts. I found they had three sisters. So I said to them, "I will ddiive it into six parts because that's what the law says, and each sibling should get one share." They protested. They said, "Our sisters are married, our srseits have got dowries, and they have given us relinquishment deeds." I was not happy, so I istesnid they bring the sisters to court because I was not sure whether the sisters had been coerced into giving their relinquishment deeds or they didn't know the law. When the women came, I asked them, "Do you know the law?" And they said, "Yes." "So then why are you giving up your sarhe?" And this is what they said: "We do not want to have any problems with our brothers or soipl our relationships with our brothers because if in the fruute we need anything of any sort, to whom shall we turn except our brothers, our natal family?" So they knew what was happening. And I said to the young men, "If you were six brothers, you would have happily shared and got one-sixth each, so why are you depriving your sisters?" But they were adamant, and their sisters also were not willing to withdraw their relinquishment deeds. So, though they were arawe, they were not willing to assret. Many people are not aware that since 2005 - that's almost 10 years ago - the daughters' rights of inheritance have been widened and now inldcue not only the self-acquired property of the father but also the ancestral property - unless, of course, the father wills away the property to someone else. So fathers, we tell you, do not will the property away to your sons or daughters. Make sure your daughters get their legitimate share. (Applause) You know, it reminds me of the sroty of Sudha Goel because daughters need to have control of their prropety, they need to feel secure, and sduha Goel had been given a dowry. One December night, the neighbors heard her screaming: "Bachao! Bachao! Save me! Save me!" So they rushed and forced their way into the flat and found her in flames. Her mother-in-law and her husband were simply sitting there. She said, "These people have kellid me. They have taken my gold and everything." There are hudredns of such cseas in India every year. How do we do it? How do we take steps to stop this? I think that I can summarize it in four words. First, aerneawss. Second, assertion. Third, atttdiue change. And fourth, action. So, sisters, don't be blackmailed by - emotionally blackmailed by your brothers. Don't take dowries; don't take after dowries. Demand your inheritance. Brothers, hadbsuns, and fathers, make sure that your daughter gets her legitimate share. And make sure that she has that confidence that is important for her. Do the legal thing, not the igllael. So when you look forward, make sure your daughters get what they deserve. You should not let your degrtahus down, and they will not let you down. (Applause) So this is the mantra: Inheritance, not dowry. Inheritance, not drwoy. Repeat it, act upon it, and get others to act upon it as well. I'd like to end with an appeal by a deuatghr to her parents. "Father, why do you dinsmtriicae against me when I can be as good as my borhetr? Mother, nurture, nourish, and educate me, and you will see that I will not be a burden but will control my own dtseniy. And you will have nothing to fear when Brother is not there. I will look after both of you in your old age. I ask only to be treated equally. Will you not dare? So that I have the freedom to choose and the right to care and am no longer the prisoner of my own gdeenr, unable to resist or retaliate against injustice. Oh fatehr, give me a chncae. Just give me a chance. Oh Mother, break the bonds of tradition and let me into the sunlight to dance, to dance, to dance." (alpauspe)

Open Cloze

The _____ of September 1942 is ______ in my memory. It was a few weeks before my twelfth birthday, and my father had just died. My mother, who had no ____________ training, found it very hard to spend the fees for our ______ fees. And my three brothers and me, she took the help of friends and scholarships in _____ to educate us. She didn't make a difference between my brothers and me. All she ______ was that all of us should _____. When I was 20, I had a semi-arranged marriage, and my _______ was ______, in 1954, to England, and I went with him. And I took _________ of being there for three years and studied law. When I returned to _____, I was required to train with a senior before I could ________ law. So I decided I should get the best lawyer, join the best lawyer, and I zeroed down on someone called ______ Chaudhary. But it was extremely difficult to get an appointment with him. After great difficulty, I did, and I was full of trepidation when I went to meet him. But I put on a brave front, just as I am doing now. (Laughter) (Applause) He had some idea why I had come, but he wanted to be completely clear. So I told him that I wanted to practice law and I wanted to join his chambers. He was not in _____ of women joining the law, so he tried to dissuade me. He said, "Young woman, instead of joining the legal profession, go and get married." (Laughter) So I said to him, "Sir, I am already married." (Laughter) "Then go and have a child," he advised. "I already have a child." (Laughter) "It's not fair to the child to be alone, so you should have a second child." (Laughter) I said, "Mr. Chaudhary, I have two children." (Laughter) So, taken _____ for the third time, he said, "Come and join my chambers. You're a persistent young woman, and you will do well at the bar." After about 20 years of practice, I was appointed a judge at the Delhi High Court, and in 1991, I was the first woman to be chief justice of a _____ high court. (Applause) As I mentioned earlier, I was 20 when I got _______, and my fiancee and his family never demanded a dowry or anything else. We had a simple celebration. We ______ vanilla ice cream and salted cashew nuts. But we still had fun, and we enjoyed ourselves. So, you can see, that you don't need anything _____. But I, now, I'm _______ married for the last 64 years. (Applause) Every _____, every mother, wants her daughter to be married. And when she meets a _____ man, she tries to size him up to find out if he's a suitable boy. But at the back of her mind is worry. Does he want a dowry? If so, how much? In fact, it's the _____ of dowry that makes _______ not want to have girls. In the old days, when girls and boys didn't have equal inheritance, a young girl was given stridhan, which is bride's wealth, at the time of her marriage. It was something that was passed from a mother to her daughter and consisted of jewelry. It was her personal property. But even that was often taken away by the bride-groom's parents and given to the groom's sister when she was getting married. So the bride had nothing. ______, the prevalence of dowries started. This meant _____ were given not only to the bride but to the bride-groom and to his ______. And demands, dowry demands, were negotiated at the time of an arranged marriage. Parents were worried as to how they would meet these demands, which sometimes _________ from day to day and from hour to hour as the wedding date approached. Sometimes, just as the wedding ceremony was about to take place, a fresh ______ would be made. It was a great trauma for parents, especially those who had more than one daughter. They were bankrupt, spent more than they had, and the _________ sometimes continued even after the wedding. So instead of loving their daughters and _______ to have them, they considered them a curse. And they resorted to something like female feticide or female infanticide. In order to prevent this evil of dowry, an act was passed. It was called the Dowry Prohibition Act, 1961. Before the act, dowries were displayed ______. After the act, the displays stopped. But the ______ and taking of dowry continued, and the demand for ostentatious _________ and feasts by the bride-groom's family, to be paid for by the bride's family, continued. This was really terrible. And very few parents would reject a young man if he or his family demanded a dowry. Most would not, even though they knew it was illegal to give or take a dowry. Let me give you an example. The year was 1991. A very senior Supreme Court of India _____ had arranged his daughter's wedding. I asked him, "Are you going to give a dowry?" ________, this was 30 years after the passing of the Dowry Prohibition Act. He was quiet. And then he said, "I'll tell you the honest truth. I will indeed give a dowry for my daughter because I cannot sacrifice her happiness and her life. In my community, she cannot get married without a dowry. But I _______ you, I will not take a dowry for my son." This is not what I wanted to hear, but at least it was half a step forward. So what do you think? Can the passing of laws ______ attitudes? In India, with a very patriarchal society, changing _________ and changing ________ is extremely difficult, and it's a slow process, but we need to fast-forward it. I had hoped that with the succession laws being changed and daughters getting some inheritance rights, the law would have had some effect on the evil of dowry. In 1956, the Hindu Succession Act was ______, and in that year, it was provided in the act that daughters and sons would get equally from their father's property which was self-acquired. This, of course, should have made a difference. But it didn't seem to have done that. In fact, women were not willing to assert. Let me tell you of an incident. I was a judge at the Delhi High Court. Three young men came for me and wanted - their father had died, he hadn't left a will, and they wanted their property to be divided into three parts. I found they had three sisters. So I said to them, "I will ______ it into six parts because that's what the law says, and each sibling should get one share." They protested. They said, "Our sisters are married, our _______ have got dowries, and they have given us relinquishment deeds." I was not happy, so I ________ they bring the sisters to court because I was not sure whether the sisters had been coerced into giving their relinquishment deeds or they didn't know the law. When the women came, I asked them, "Do you know the law?" And they said, "Yes." "So then why are you giving up your _____?" And this is what they said: "We do not want to have any problems with our brothers or _____ our relationships with our brothers because if in the ______ we need anything of any sort, to whom shall we turn except our brothers, our natal family?" So they knew what was happening. And I said to the young men, "If you were six brothers, you would have happily shared and got one-sixth each, so why are you depriving your sisters?" But they were adamant, and their sisters also were not willing to withdraw their relinquishment deeds. So, though they were _____, they were not willing to ______. Many people are not aware that since 2005 - that's almost 10 years ago - the daughters' rights of inheritance have been widened and now _______ not only the self-acquired property of the father but also the ancestral property - unless, of course, the father wills away the property to someone else. So fathers, we tell you, do not will the property away to your sons or daughters. Make sure your daughters get their legitimate share. (Applause) You know, it reminds me of the _____ of Sudha Goel because daughters need to have control of their ________, they need to feel secure, and _____ Goel had been given a dowry. One December night, the neighbors heard her screaming: "Bachao! Bachao! Save me! Save me!" So they rushed and forced their way into the flat and found her in flames. Her mother-in-law and her husband were simply sitting there. She said, "These people have ______ me. They have taken my gold and everything." There are ________ of such _____ in India every year. How do we do it? How do we take steps to stop this? I think that I can summarize it in four words. First, _________. Second, assertion. Third, ________ change. And fourth, action. So, sisters, don't be blackmailed by - emotionally blackmailed by your brothers. Don't take dowries; don't take after dowries. Demand your inheritance. Brothers, ________, and fathers, make sure that your daughter gets her legitimate share. And make sure that she has that confidence that is important for her. Do the legal thing, not the _______. So when you look forward, make sure your daughters get what they deserve. You should not let your _________ down, and they will not let you down. (Applause) So this is the mantra: Inheritance, not dowry. Inheritance, not _____. Repeat it, act upon it, and get others to act upon it as well. I'd like to end with an appeal by a ________ to her parents. "Father, why do you ____________ against me when I can be as good as my _______? Mother, nurture, nourish, and educate me, and you will see that I will not be a burden but will control my own _______. And you will have nothing to fear when Brother is not there. I will look after both of you in your old age. I ask only to be treated equally. Will you not dare? So that I have the freedom to choose and the right to care and am no longer the prisoner of my own ______, unable to resist or retaliate against injustice. Oh ______, give me a ______. Just give me a chance. Oh Mother, break the bonds of tradition and let me into the sunlight to dance, to dance, to dance." (________)

Solution

  1. daughters
  2. woman
  3. order
  4. dowry
  5. hundreds
  6. month
  7. discriminate
  8. posted
  9. story
  10. promise
  11. sachin
  12. increased
  13. gifts
  14. professional
  15. include
  16. spoil
  17. aware
  18. favor
  19. etched
  20. husbands
  21. giving
  22. advantage
  23. young
  24. remember
  25. illegal
  26. attitude
  27. state
  28. openly
  29. chance
  30. destiny
  31. passed
  32. brother
  33. sisters
  34. family
  35. divide
  36. india
  37. killed
  38. demand
  39. mindsets
  40. future
  41. gender
  42. insisted
  43. applause
  44. change
  45. cases
  46. wanted
  47. aback
  48. school
  49. husband
  50. slowly
  51. wanting
  52. father
  53. daughter
  54. awareness
  55. served
  56. happily
  57. functions
  58. property
  59. excel
  60. practice
  61. judge
  62. curse
  63. assert
  64. married
  65. attitudes
  66. extortion
  67. parents
  68. share
  69. sudha
  70. extra

Original Text

The month of September 1942 is etched in my memory. It was a few weeks before my twelfth birthday, and my father had just died. My mother, who had no professional training, found it very hard to spend the fees for our school fees. And my three brothers and me, she took the help of friends and scholarships in order to educate us. She didn't make a difference between my brothers and me. All she wanted was that all of us should excel. When I was 20, I had a semi-arranged marriage, and my husband was posted, in 1954, to England, and I went with him. And I took advantage of being there for three years and studied law. When I returned to India, I was required to train with a senior before I could practice law. So I decided I should get the best lawyer, join the best lawyer, and I zeroed down on someone called Sachin Chaudhary. But it was extremely difficult to get an appointment with him. After great difficulty, I did, and I was full of trepidation when I went to meet him. But I put on a brave front, just as I am doing now. (Laughter) (Applause) He had some idea why I had come, but he wanted to be completely clear. So I told him that I wanted to practice law and I wanted to join his chambers. He was not in favor of women joining the law, so he tried to dissuade me. He said, "Young woman, instead of joining the legal profession, go and get married." (Laughter) So I said to him, "Sir, I am already married." (Laughter) "Then go and have a child," he advised. "I already have a child." (Laughter) "It's not fair to the child to be alone, so you should have a second child." (Laughter) I said, "Mr. Chaudhary, I have two children." (Laughter) So, taken aback for the third time, he said, "Come and join my chambers. You're a persistent young woman, and you will do well at the bar." After about 20 years of practice, I was appointed a judge at the Delhi High Court, and in 1991, I was the first woman to be chief justice of a state high court. (Applause) As I mentioned earlier, I was 20 when I got married, and my fiancee and his family never demanded a dowry or anything else. We had a simple celebration. We served vanilla ice cream and salted cashew nuts. But we still had fun, and we enjoyed ourselves. So, you can see, that you don't need anything extra. But I, now, I'm happily married for the last 64 years. (Applause) Every woman, every mother, wants her daughter to be married. And when she meets a young man, she tries to size him up to find out if he's a suitable boy. But at the back of her mind is worry. Does he want a dowry? If so, how much? In fact, it's the curse of dowry that makes parents not want to have girls. In the old days, when girls and boys didn't have equal inheritance, a young girl was given stridhan, which is bride's wealth, at the time of her marriage. It was something that was passed from a mother to her daughter and consisted of jewelry. It was her personal property. But even that was often taken away by the bride-groom's parents and given to the groom's sister when she was getting married. So the bride had nothing. Slowly, the prevalence of dowries started. This meant gifts were given not only to the bride but to the bride-groom and to his family. And demands, dowry demands, were negotiated at the time of an arranged marriage. Parents were worried as to how they would meet these demands, which sometimes increased from day to day and from hour to hour as the wedding date approached. Sometimes, just as the wedding ceremony was about to take place, a fresh demand would be made. It was a great trauma for parents, especially those who had more than one daughter. They were bankrupt, spent more than they had, and the extortion sometimes continued even after the wedding. So instead of loving their daughters and wanting to have them, they considered them a curse. And they resorted to something like female feticide or female infanticide. In order to prevent this evil of dowry, an act was passed. It was called the Dowry Prohibition Act, 1961. Before the act, dowries were displayed openly. After the act, the displays stopped. But the giving and taking of dowry continued, and the demand for ostentatious functions and feasts by the bride-groom's family, to be paid for by the bride's family, continued. This was really terrible. And very few parents would reject a young man if he or his family demanded a dowry. Most would not, even though they knew it was illegal to give or take a dowry. Let me give you an example. The year was 1991. A very senior Supreme Court of India judge had arranged his daughter's wedding. I asked him, "Are you going to give a dowry?" Remember, this was 30 years after the passing of the Dowry Prohibition Act. He was quiet. And then he said, "I'll tell you the honest truth. I will indeed give a dowry for my daughter because I cannot sacrifice her happiness and her life. In my community, she cannot get married without a dowry. But I promise you, I will not take a dowry for my son." This is not what I wanted to hear, but at least it was half a step forward. So what do you think? Can the passing of laws change attitudes? In India, with a very patriarchal society, changing attitudes and changing mindsets is extremely difficult, and it's a slow process, but we need to fast-forward it. I had hoped that with the succession laws being changed and daughters getting some inheritance rights, the law would have had some effect on the evil of dowry. In 1956, the Hindu Succession Act was passed, and in that year, it was provided in the act that daughters and sons would get equally from their father's property which was self-acquired. This, of course, should have made a difference. But it didn't seem to have done that. In fact, women were not willing to assert. Let me tell you of an incident. I was a judge at the Delhi High Court. Three young men came for me and wanted - their father had died, he hadn't left a will, and they wanted their property to be divided into three parts. I found they had three sisters. So I said to them, "I will divide it into six parts because that's what the law says, and each sibling should get one share." They protested. They said, "Our sisters are married, our sisters have got dowries, and they have given us relinquishment deeds." I was not happy, so I insisted they bring the sisters to court because I was not sure whether the sisters had been coerced into giving their relinquishment deeds or they didn't know the law. When the women came, I asked them, "Do you know the law?" And they said, "Yes." "So then why are you giving up your share?" And this is what they said: "We do not want to have any problems with our brothers or spoil our relationships with our brothers because if in the future we need anything of any sort, to whom shall we turn except our brothers, our natal family?" So they knew what was happening. And I said to the young men, "If you were six brothers, you would have happily shared and got one-sixth each, so why are you depriving your sisters?" But they were adamant, and their sisters also were not willing to withdraw their relinquishment deeds. So, though they were aware, they were not willing to assert. Many people are not aware that since 2005 - that's almost 10 years ago - the daughters' rights of inheritance have been widened and now include not only the self-acquired property of the father but also the ancestral property - unless, of course, the father wills away the property to someone else. So fathers, we tell you, do not will the property away to your sons or daughters. Make sure your daughters get their legitimate share. (Applause) You know, it reminds me of the story of Sudha Goel because daughters need to have control of their property, they need to feel secure, and Sudha Goel had been given a dowry. One December night, the neighbors heard her screaming: "Bachao! Bachao! Save me! Save me!" So they rushed and forced their way into the flat and found her in flames. Her mother-in-law and her husband were simply sitting there. She said, "These people have killed me. They have taken my gold and everything." There are hundreds of such cases in India every year. How do we do it? How do we take steps to stop this? I think that I can summarize it in four words. First, awareness. Second, assertion. Third, attitude change. And fourth, action. So, sisters, don't be blackmailed by - emotionally blackmailed by your brothers. Don't take dowries; don't take after dowries. Demand your inheritance. Brothers, husbands, and fathers, make sure that your daughter gets her legitimate share. And make sure that she has that confidence that is important for her. Do the legal thing, not the illegal. So when you look forward, make sure your daughters get what they deserve. You should not let your daughters down, and they will not let you down. (Applause) So this is the mantra: Inheritance, not dowry. Inheritance, not dowry. Repeat it, act upon it, and get others to act upon it as well. I'd like to end with an appeal by a daughter to her parents. "Father, why do you discriminate against me when I can be as good as my brother? Mother, nurture, nourish, and educate me, and you will see that I will not be a burden but will control my own destiny. And you will have nothing to fear when Brother is not there. I will look after both of you in your old age. I ask only to be treated equally. Will you not dare? So that I have the freedom to choose and the right to care and am no longer the prisoner of my own gender, unable to resist or retaliate against injustice. Oh Father, give me a chance. Just give me a chance. Oh Mother, break the bonds of tradition and let me into the sunlight to dance, to dance, to dance." (Applause)

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
practice law 2
delhi high 2
high court 2
dowry prohibition 2
relinquishment deeds 2
legitimate share 2
sudha goel 2

Important Words

  1. aback
  2. act
  3. action
  4. adamant
  5. advantage
  6. advised
  7. age
  8. ancestral
  9. appeal
  10. applause
  11. appointed
  12. appointment
  13. approached
  14. arranged
  15. asked
  16. assert
  17. assertion
  18. attitude
  19. attitudes
  20. aware
  21. awareness
  22. bankrupt
  23. bar
  24. birthday
  25. blackmailed
  26. bonds
  27. boy
  28. boys
  29. brave
  30. break
  31. bride
  32. bring
  33. brother
  34. brothers
  35. burden
  36. called
  37. care
  38. cases
  39. cashew
  40. celebration
  41. ceremony
  42. chambers
  43. chance
  44. change
  45. changed
  46. changing
  47. chaudhary
  48. chief
  49. child
  50. children
  51. choose
  52. clear
  53. coerced
  54. community
  55. completely
  56. confidence
  57. considered
  58. consisted
  59. continued
  60. control
  61. court
  62. cream
  63. curse
  64. dance
  65. date
  66. daughter
  67. daughters
  68. day
  69. days
  70. december
  71. decided
  72. deeds
  73. delhi
  74. demand
  75. demanded
  76. demands
  77. depriving
  78. deserve
  79. destiny
  80. died
  81. difference
  82. difficult
  83. difficulty
  84. discriminate
  85. displayed
  86. displays
  87. dissuade
  88. divide
  89. divided
  90. dowries
  91. dowry
  92. earlier
  93. educate
  94. effect
  95. emotionally
  96. england
  97. enjoyed
  98. equal
  99. equally
  100. etched
  101. evil
  102. excel
  103. extortion
  104. extra
  105. extremely
  106. fact
  107. fair
  108. family
  109. father
  110. fathers
  111. favor
  112. fear
  113. feasts
  114. feel
  115. fees
  116. female
  117. feticide
  118. fiancee
  119. find
  120. flames
  121. flat
  122. forced
  123. fourth
  124. freedom
  125. fresh
  126. friends
  127. front
  128. full
  129. fun
  130. functions
  131. future
  132. gender
  133. gifts
  134. girl
  135. girls
  136. give
  137. giving
  138. goel
  139. gold
  140. good
  141. great
  142. happening
  143. happily
  144. happiness
  145. happy
  146. hard
  147. hear
  148. heard
  149. high
  150. hindu
  151. honest
  152. hoped
  153. hour
  154. hundreds
  155. husband
  156. husbands
  157. ice
  158. idea
  159. illegal
  160. important
  161. incident
  162. include
  163. increased
  164. india
  165. infanticide
  166. inheritance
  167. injustice
  168. insisted
  169. jewelry
  170. join
  171. joining
  172. judge
  173. justice
  174. killed
  175. knew
  176. laughter
  177. law
  178. laws
  179. lawyer
  180. left
  181. legal
  182. legitimate
  183. life
  184. longer
  185. loving
  186. man
  187. marriage
  188. married
  189. meant
  190. meet
  191. meets
  192. memory
  193. men
  194. mentioned
  195. mind
  196. mindsets
  197. month
  198. mother
  199. natal
  200. negotiated
  201. neighbors
  202. night
  203. nourish
  204. nurture
  205. nuts
  206. openly
  207. order
  208. ostentatious
  209. paid
  210. parents
  211. parts
  212. passed
  213. passing
  214. patriarchal
  215. people
  216. persistent
  217. personal
  218. place
  219. posted
  220. practice
  221. prevalence
  222. prevent
  223. prisoner
  224. problems
  225. process
  226. profession
  227. professional
  228. prohibition
  229. promise
  230. property
  231. protested
  232. put
  233. quiet
  234. reject
  235. relationships
  236. relinquishment
  237. remember
  238. reminds
  239. repeat
  240. required
  241. resist
  242. resorted
  243. retaliate
  244. returned
  245. rights
  246. rushed
  247. sachin
  248. sacrifice
  249. salted
  250. save
  251. scholarships
  252. school
  253. secure
  254. senior
  255. september
  256. served
  257. share
  258. shared
  259. sibling
  260. simple
  261. simply
  262. sister
  263. sisters
  264. sitting
  265. size
  266. slow
  267. slowly
  268. society
  269. son
  270. sons
  271. sort
  272. spend
  273. spent
  274. spoil
  275. started
  276. state
  277. step
  278. steps
  279. stop
  280. stopped
  281. story
  282. stridhan
  283. studied
  284. succession
  285. sudha
  286. suitable
  287. summarize
  288. sunlight
  289. supreme
  290. terrible
  291. time
  292. told
  293. tradition
  294. train
  295. training
  296. trauma
  297. treated
  298. trepidation
  299. truth
  300. turn
  301. twelfth
  302. unable
  303. vanilla
  304. wanted
  305. wanting
  306. wealth
  307. wedding
  308. weeks
  309. widened
  310. wills
  311. withdraw
  312. woman
  313. women
  314. words
  315. worried
  316. worry
  317. year
  318. years
  319. young
  320. zeroed