full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Monique W. Morris: Why Black girls are targeted for punishment at school -- and how to change that

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Let's focus on how and what a girl learns rather than policing her body in ways that facilitate rape culture or pusinh children for the conditions in which they were born. This is where parents and the community of concerned adults can enter this work. Start a corosvatnein with the sochol and encourage them to address their dress code and other conduct-related policies as a clvraiaooblte project, with parents and students, so as to intentionally avoid bias and discrimination. Keep in mind, though, that some of the practices that harm black girls most are utnterwin. So we have to continue to do the deep, internal work to address the besias that inform how, when and whether we see black girls for who they actually are, or what we've been told they are. veetolnur at a school and establish culturally competent and gender roenpsvise discussion groups with black girls, lntaais, indigenous glris and other students who experience marginalization in sloochs to give them a safe space to process their identities and exrecieneps in schools. And if schools are to become locations for healing, we have to remove police oifcfres and increase the number of counselors in schools.

Open Cloze

Let's focus on how and what a girl learns rather than policing her body in ways that facilitate rape culture or ______ children for the conditions in which they were born. This is where parents and the community of concerned adults can enter this work. Start a ____________ with the ______ and encourage them to address their dress code and other conduct-related policies as a _____________ project, with parents and students, so as to intentionally avoid bias and discrimination. Keep in mind, though, that some of the practices that harm black girls most are _________. So we have to continue to do the deep, internal work to address the ______ that inform how, when and whether we see black girls for who they actually are, or what we've been told they are. _________ at a school and establish culturally competent and gender __________ discussion groups with black girls, _______, indigenous _____ and other students who experience marginalization in _______ to give them a safe space to process their identities and ___________ in schools. And if schools are to become locations for healing, we have to remove police ________ and increase the number of counselors in schools.

Solution

  1. conversation
  2. biases
  3. schools
  4. volunteer
  5. unwritten
  6. latinas
  7. responsive
  8. experiences
  9. school
  10. officers
  11. punish
  12. collaborative
  13. girls

Original Text

Let's focus on how and what a girl learns rather than policing her body in ways that facilitate rape culture or punish children for the conditions in which they were born. This is where parents and the community of concerned adults can enter this work. Start a conversation with the school and encourage them to address their dress code and other conduct-related policies as a collaborative project, with parents and students, so as to intentionally avoid bias and discrimination. Keep in mind, though, that some of the practices that harm black girls most are unwritten. So we have to continue to do the deep, internal work to address the biases that inform how, when and whether we see black girls for who they actually are, or what we've been told they are. Volunteer at a school and establish culturally competent and gender responsive discussion groups with black girls, Latinas, indigenous girls and other students who experience marginalization in schools to give them a safe space to process their identities and experiences in schools. And if schools are to become locations for healing, we have to remove police officers and increase the number of counselors in schools.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
black girls 16
white peers 2
high school 2
safe space 2
school girls 2
police officers 2
adverse childhood 2
childhood experiences 2
freedom work 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
adverse childhood experiences 2

Important Words

  1. address
  2. adults
  3. avoid
  4. bias
  5. biases
  6. black
  7. body
  8. born
  9. children
  10. code
  11. collaborative
  12. community
  13. competent
  14. concerned
  15. conditions
  16. continue
  17. conversation
  18. counselors
  19. culturally
  20. culture
  21. deep
  22. discrimination
  23. discussion
  24. dress
  25. encourage
  26. enter
  27. establish
  28. experience
  29. experiences
  30. facilitate
  31. focus
  32. gender
  33. girl
  34. girls
  35. give
  36. groups
  37. harm
  38. healing
  39. identities
  40. increase
  41. indigenous
  42. inform
  43. intentionally
  44. internal
  45. latinas
  46. learns
  47. locations
  48. marginalization
  49. mind
  50. number
  51. officers
  52. parents
  53. police
  54. policies
  55. policing
  56. practices
  57. process
  58. project
  59. punish
  60. rape
  61. remove
  62. responsive
  63. safe
  64. school
  65. schools
  66. space
  67. start
  68. students
  69. told
  70. unwritten
  71. volunteer
  72. ways
  73. work