full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Alyson McGregor: Why medicine often has dangerous side effects for women

Unscramble the Blue Letters

It used to be thought that those sex-determining chromosomes pucterid here — XY if you're male, XX if you're female — merely determined whether you would be born with ovaries or testes, and it was the sex hormones that those organs produced that were responsible for the differences we see in the opposite sex. But we now know that that theory was wrong — or it's at least a little incomplete. And thankfully, sniteitcss like Dr. Page from the Whitehead Institute, who works on the Y chromosome, and dtocor Yang from UCLA, they have found evidence that tells us that those sex-determining cmorheomsos that are in every cell in our bodies continue to remain active for our eritne lives and could be what's responsible for the differences we see in the diosng of dgrus, or why there are differences between men and women in the susceptibility and severity of diseases. This new knowledge is the game-changer, and it's up to those scientists that continue to find that ecednvie, but it's up to the clinicians to start translating this data at the bddseie, tdaoy. Right now. And to help do this, I'm a co-founder of a national onriatiazogn called Sex and Gender Women's Health Collaborative, and we cocllet all of this data so that it's available for tcaneihg and for patient care. And we're working to bring together the medical educators to the table. That's a big job. It's changing the way medical training has been done since its inception.

Open Cloze

It used to be thought that those sex-determining chromosomes ________ here — XY if you're male, XX if you're female — merely determined whether you would be born with ovaries or testes, and it was the sex hormones that those organs produced that were responsible for the differences we see in the opposite sex. But we now know that that theory was wrong — or it's at least a little incomplete. And thankfully, __________ like Dr. Page from the Whitehead Institute, who works on the Y chromosome, and ______ Yang from UCLA, they have found evidence that tells us that those sex-determining ___________ that are in every cell in our bodies continue to remain active for our ______ lives and could be what's responsible for the differences we see in the ______ of _____, or why there are differences between men and women in the susceptibility and severity of diseases. This new knowledge is the game-changer, and it's up to those scientists that continue to find that ________, but it's up to the clinicians to start translating this data at the _______, _____. Right now. And to help do this, I'm a co-founder of a national ____________ called Sex and Gender Women's Health Collaborative, and we _______ all of this data so that it's available for ________ and for patient care. And we're working to bring together the medical educators to the table. That's a big job. It's changing the way medical training has been done since its inception.

Solution

  1. chromosomes
  2. pictured
  3. dosing
  4. teaching
  5. drugs
  6. bedside
  7. entire
  8. evidence
  9. scientists
  10. today
  11. organization
  12. doctor
  13. collect

Original Text

It used to be thought that those sex-determining chromosomes pictured here — XY if you're male, XX if you're female — merely determined whether you would be born with ovaries or testes, and it was the sex hormones that those organs produced that were responsible for the differences we see in the opposite sex. But we now know that that theory was wrong — or it's at least a little incomplete. And thankfully, scientists like Dr. Page from the Whitehead Institute, who works on the Y chromosome, and Doctor Yang from UCLA, they have found evidence that tells us that those sex-determining chromosomes that are in every cell in our bodies continue to remain active for our entire lives and could be what's responsible for the differences we see in the dosing of drugs, or why there are differences between men and women in the susceptibility and severity of diseases. This new knowledge is the game-changer, and it's up to those scientists that continue to find that evidence, but it's up to the clinicians to start translating this data at the bedside, today. Right now. And to help do this, I'm a co-founder of a national organization called Sex and Gender Women's Health Collaborative, and we collect all of this data so that it's available for teaching and for patient care. And we're working to bring together the medical educators to the table. That's a big job. It's changing the way medical training has been done since its inception.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
medical research 4
health care 4
emergency medicine 3
side effects 3
runny noses 2
clinical trials 2
motor vehicle 2
research studies 2
sex hormones 2
heart disease 2
blood vessels 2
women compared 2
give aspirin 2
called sex 2
medical care 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
medical research studies 2

Important Words

  1. active
  2. bedside
  3. big
  4. bodies
  5. born
  6. bring
  7. called
  8. care
  9. cell
  10. changing
  11. chromosome
  12. chromosomes
  13. clinicians
  14. collaborative
  15. collect
  16. continue
  17. data
  18. determined
  19. differences
  20. diseases
  21. doctor
  22. dosing
  23. dr
  24. drugs
  25. educators
  26. entire
  27. evidence
  28. female
  29. find
  30. gender
  31. health
  32. hormones
  33. inception
  34. incomplete
  35. institute
  36. job
  37. knowledge
  38. lives
  39. male
  40. medical
  41. men
  42. national
  43. organization
  44. organs
  45. ovaries
  46. page
  47. patient
  48. pictured
  49. produced
  50. remain
  51. responsible
  52. scientists
  53. severity
  54. sex
  55. start
  56. susceptibility
  57. table
  58. teaching
  59. tells
  60. testes
  61. thankfully
  62. theory
  63. thought
  64. today
  65. training
  66. translating
  67. ucla
  68. whitehead
  69. women
  70. working
  71. works
  72. wrong
  73. xx
  74. xy
  75. yang