full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Adam Alter: Why our screens make us less happy

Unscramble the Blue Letters

One of the reasons we snepd so much time on these apps that make us uphnpay is they rob us of stopping cues. Stopping cues were everywhere in the 20th century. They were baked into everything we did. A stopping cue is basically a singal that it's time to move on, to do something new, to do something different. And — think about newspapers; eventually you get to the end, you fold the newspaper away, you put it aside. The same with magazines, books — you get to the end of a cthpaer, prompts you to consider whether you want to continue. You watched a show on TV, eventually the show would end, and then you'd have a week until the next one came. There were stopping cues everywhere. But the way we consume media today is such that there are no sitpnpog cues. The news feed just rlols on, and everything's bottomless: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, eimal, text manigsesg, the news. And when you do check all sorts of other sources, you can just keep going on and on and on.

Open Cloze

One of the reasons we _____ so much time on these apps that make us _______ is they rob us of stopping cues. Stopping cues were everywhere in the 20th century. They were baked into everything we did. A stopping cue is basically a ______ that it's time to move on, to do something new, to do something different. And — think about newspapers; eventually you get to the end, you fold the newspaper away, you put it aside. The same with magazines, books — you get to the end of a _______, prompts you to consider whether you want to continue. You watched a show on TV, eventually the show would end, and then you'd have a week until the next one came. There were stopping cues everywhere. But the way we consume media today is such that there are no ________ cues. The news feed just _____ on, and everything's bottomless: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, _____, text _________, the news. And when you do check all sorts of other sources, you can just keep going on and on and on.

Solution

  1. rolls
  2. stopping
  3. signal
  4. spend
  5. chapter
  6. email
  7. messaging
  8. unhappy

Original Text

One of the reasons we spend so much time on these apps that make us unhappy is they rob us of stopping cues. Stopping cues were everywhere in the 20th century. They were baked into everything we did. A stopping cue is basically a signal that it's time to move on, to do something new, to do something different. And — think about newspapers; eventually you get to the end, you fold the newspaper away, you put it aside. The same with magazines, books — you get to the end of a chapter, prompts you to consider whether you want to continue. You watched a show on TV, eventually the show would end, and then you'd have a week until the next one came. There were stopping cues everywhere. But the way we consume media today is such that there are no stopping cues. The news feed just rolls on, and everything's bottomless: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, email, text messaging, the news. And when you do check all sorts of other sources, you can just keep going on and on and on.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
stopping cues 4
dog food 2
silicon valley 2
pretty good 2
stopping cue 2

Important Words

  1. apps
  2. baked
  3. basically
  4. books
  5. century
  6. chapter
  7. check
  8. consume
  9. continue
  10. cue
  11. cues
  12. email
  13. eventually
  14. facebook
  15. feed
  16. fold
  17. instagram
  18. magazines
  19. media
  20. messaging
  21. move
  22. news
  23. newspaper
  24. prompts
  25. put
  26. reasons
  27. rob
  28. rolls
  29. show
  30. signal
  31. sorts
  32. sources
  33. spend
  34. stopping
  35. text
  36. time
  37. today
  38. tv
  39. twitter
  40. unhappy
  41. watched
  42. week