full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Glenn Greenwald: Why privacy matters

Unscramble the Blue Letters

This realization was exploited most powerfully for pragmatic ends by the 18th- century ppisoeolhhr Jeremy Bentham, who set out to resolve an important problem ushered in by the industrial age, where, for the first time, itttnnsiiuos had become so large and centralized that they were no longer able to monitor and therefore cntoorl each one of their individual members, and the solution that he devised was an attcciuerahrl design oilanlirgy intended to be implemented in prisons that he called the panopticon, the primary attribute of which was the construction of an enormous tweor in the center of the institution where whoever controlled the institution could at any moment watch any of the inmates, although they couldn't watch all of them at all times. And crucial to this design was that the intaems could not actually see into the panopticon, into the tower, and so they never knew if they were being watched or even when. And what made him so excited about this discovery was that that would mean that the prisoners would have to assume that they were being watched at any given moment, which would be the ultimate enforcer for obedience and compliance. The 20th-century French philosopher Michel Foucault realized that that model could be used not just for piorsns but for every institution that seeks to control hmuan behavior: schools, hospitals, fricetoas, workplaces. And what he said was that this mindset, this framework discovered by Bentham, was the key manes of sitecoal control for modern, Western stoiieces, which no longer need the overt weapons of traynnypuinhnsig or imprisoning or kllniig dsesntiids, or legally compelling loyalty to a particular party — because mass svlaenilcrue creates a prison in the mind that is a much more subtle though much more effective means of fostering compliance with social norms or with social orthodoxy, much more effective than brute force could ever be.

Open Cloze

This realization was exploited most powerfully for pragmatic ends by the 18th- century ___________ Jeremy Bentham, who set out to resolve an important problem ushered in by the industrial age, where, for the first time, ____________ had become so large and centralized that they were no longer able to monitor and therefore _______ each one of their individual members, and the solution that he devised was an _____________ design __________ intended to be implemented in prisons that he called the panopticon, the primary attribute of which was the construction of an enormous _____ in the center of the institution where whoever controlled the institution could at any moment watch any of the inmates, although they couldn't watch all of them at all times. And crucial to this design was that the _______ could not actually see into the panopticon, into the tower, and so they never knew if they were being watched or even when. And what made him so excited about this discovery was that that would mean that the prisoners would have to assume that they were being watched at any given moment, which would be the ultimate enforcer for obedience and compliance. The 20th-century French philosopher Michel Foucault realized that that model could be used not just for _______ but for every institution that seeks to control _____ behavior: schools, hospitals, _________, workplaces. And what he said was that this mindset, this framework discovered by Bentham, was the key _____ of ________ control for modern, Western _________, which no longer need the overt weapons of ________________ or imprisoning or _______ __________, or legally compelling loyalty to a particular party — because mass ____________ creates a prison in the mind that is a much more subtle though much more effective means of fostering compliance with social norms or with social orthodoxy, much more effective than brute force could ever be.

Solution

  1. prisons
  2. surveillance
  3. killing
  4. originally
  5. architectural
  6. means
  7. inmates
  8. human
  9. philosopher
  10. societal
  11. factories
  12. tyranny
  13. institutions
  14. punishing
  15. control
  16. tower
  17. societies
  18. dissidents

Original Text

This realization was exploited most powerfully for pragmatic ends by the 18th- century philosopher Jeremy Bentham, who set out to resolve an important problem ushered in by the industrial age, where, for the first time, institutions had become so large and centralized that they were no longer able to monitor and therefore control each one of their individual members, and the solution that he devised was an architectural design originally intended to be implemented in prisons that he called the panopticon, the primary attribute of which was the construction of an enormous tower in the center of the institution where whoever controlled the institution could at any moment watch any of the inmates, although they couldn't watch all of them at all times. And crucial to this design was that the inmates could not actually see into the panopticon, into the tower, and so they never knew if they were being watched or even when. And what made him so excited about this discovery was that that would mean that the prisoners would have to assume that they were being watched at any given moment, which would be the ultimate enforcer for obedience and compliance. The 20th-century French philosopher Michel Foucault realized that that model could be used not just for prisons but for every institution that seeks to control human behavior: schools, hospitals, factories, workplaces. And what he said was that this mindset, this framework discovered by Bentham, was the key means of societal control for modern, Western societies, which no longer need the overt weapons of tyranny — punishing or imprisoning or killing dissidents, or legally compelling loyalty to a particular party — because mass surveillance creates a prison in the mind that is a much more subtle though much more effective means of fostering compliance with social norms or with social orthodoxy, much more effective than brute force could ever be.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
mass surveillance 4
edward snowden 3
united states 3
bad people 3
good people 2
email address 2
judgmental eyes 2
ultimate enforcer 2
surveillance state 2
distract attention 2

Important Words

  1. age
  2. architectural
  3. assume
  4. attribute
  5. bentham
  6. brute
  7. called
  8. center
  9. centralized
  10. century
  11. compelling
  12. compliance
  13. construction
  14. control
  15. controlled
  16. creates
  17. crucial
  18. design
  19. devised
  20. discovered
  21. discovery
  22. dissidents
  23. effective
  24. ends
  25. enforcer
  26. enormous
  27. excited
  28. exploited
  29. factories
  30. force
  31. fostering
  32. foucault
  33. framework
  34. french
  35. hospitals
  36. human
  37. implemented
  38. important
  39. imprisoning
  40. individual
  41. industrial
  42. inmates
  43. institution
  44. institutions
  45. intended
  46. jeremy
  47. key
  48. killing
  49. knew
  50. large
  51. legally
  52. longer
  53. loyalty
  54. mass
  55. means
  56. members
  57. michel
  58. mind
  59. mindset
  60. model
  61. modern
  62. moment
  63. monitor
  64. norms
  65. obedience
  66. originally
  67. orthodoxy
  68. overt
  69. panopticon
  70. party
  71. philosopher
  72. powerfully
  73. pragmatic
  74. primary
  75. prison
  76. prisoners
  77. prisons
  78. problem
  79. punishing
  80. realization
  81. realized
  82. resolve
  83. schools
  84. seeks
  85. set
  86. social
  87. societal
  88. societies
  89. solution
  90. subtle
  91. surveillance
  92. time
  93. times
  94. tower
  95. tyranny
  96. ultimate
  97. ushered
  98. watch
  99. watched
  100. weapons
  101. western
  102. workplaces