full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Murat Dalkilinç: Why sitting is bad for you

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Right now, you're probably sitting down to watch this video and staying seated for a few mnitues to view it is probably okay. But the logner you stay put, the more agitated your body becomes. It sits there counting down the moments until you snatd up again and take it for a walk. That may sound ridiculous. Our bdioes love to sit, right? Not really. Sure, sitting for brief periods can help us revoecr from stress or recuperate from exercise. But noawdyas, our lifestyles make us sit much more than we move around, and our bodies simply aren't built for such a sedentary existence. In fact, just the opposite is true. The human body is bulit to move, and you can see evidence of that in the way it's suercuttrd. Inside us are over 360 jonits, and about 700 skeletal muscles that eanble easy, fluid motion. The body's unique physical structure gives us the ability to stand up straight against the pull of gravity. Our blood ddepnes on us moving around to be able to circulate perorlpy. Our nerve cells befneit from movement, and our skin is elastic, meaning it molds to our mootins. So if every inch of the body is ready and waiting for you to move, what happens when you just don't? Let's strat with the backbone of the problem, literally. Your spine is a long structure made of bones and the clartigae discs that sit between them. Joints, muscles and ligaments that are attached to the bones hold it all together. A common way of sitting is with a curved back and slumped shoulders, a poiostin that puts uneven pressure on your spine. Over time, this causes wear and tear in your spinal dicss, overworks certain lgianmtes and joints, and puts strain on muscles that stretch to accommodate your back's curved position. This hunched shape also shrinks your chest cavity while you sit, meaning your lungs have less space to expand into when you barteh. That's a problem because it temporarily litmis the amount of oxygen that fills your lugns and filters into your blood. Around the skeleton are the muscles, nerves, arteries and veins that form the body's soft tissue layers. The very act of sitting sqhasues, pressurizes and compresses, and these more delicate tussies really feel the brunt. Have you ever experienced numbness and swelling in your lmbis when you sit? In areas that are the most compressed, your nerves, arteries and veins can become blocked, which limits nreve signaling, causing the numbness, and reduces blood flow in your limbs, causing them to swell. Sitting for long prieods also temporarily deaveicatts lipoprotein lipase, a special enzyme in the walls of boold capillaries that breaks down fats in the blood, so when you sit, you're not burning fat nearly as well as when you move around. What effect does all of this ssiats have on the brain? Most of the time, you probably sit down to use your brain, but ironically, lengthy periods of sitting actually run counter to this goal. Being stationary reduces blood flow and the aonmut of oxygen entering your blood stream through your lungs. Your brain requires both of those things to remain alret, so your concentration levels will most likely dip as your brain activity sowls. Unfortunately, the ill effects of being seated don't only exist in the short term. Recent studies have found that stntiig for long periods is linked with some types of cancers and heart disease and can contribute to diabetes, kidney and liver problems. In fact, researchers have worked out that, worldwide, inactivity causes about 9% of premature dehats a year. That's over 5 million people. So what seems like such a hemsrlas hiabt actually has the power to change our health. But likculy, the solutions to this mounting threat are spimle and itnviiute. When you have no choice but to sit, try sniichtwg the slouch for a strihaetgr sipne, and when you don't have to be bound to your seat, aim to move around much more, perhaps by setting a reminder to yourself to get up every half hour. But mostly, just appreciate that bodies are built for motion, not for stillness. In fact, since the video's almost over, why not stand up and stretch right now? Treat your body to a walk. It'll thank you later.

Open Cloze

Right now, you're probably sitting down to watch this video and staying seated for a few _______ to view it is probably okay. But the ______ you stay put, the more agitated your body becomes. It sits there counting down the moments until you _____ up again and take it for a walk. That may sound ridiculous. Our ______ love to sit, right? Not really. Sure, sitting for brief periods can help us _______ from stress or recuperate from exercise. But ________, our lifestyles make us sit much more than we move around, and our bodies simply aren't built for such a sedentary existence. In fact, just the opposite is true. The human body is _____ to move, and you can see evidence of that in the way it's __________. Inside us are over 360 ______, and about 700 skeletal muscles that ______ easy, fluid motion. The body's unique physical structure gives us the ability to stand up straight against the pull of gravity. Our blood _______ on us moving around to be able to circulate ________. Our nerve cells _______ from movement, and our skin is elastic, meaning it molds to our _______. So if every inch of the body is ready and waiting for you to move, what happens when you just don't? Let's _____ with the backbone of the problem, literally. Your spine is a long structure made of bones and the _________ discs that sit between them. Joints, muscles and ligaments that are attached to the bones hold it all together. A common way of sitting is with a curved back and slumped shoulders, a ________ that puts uneven pressure on your spine. Over time, this causes wear and tear in your spinal _____, overworks certain _________ and joints, and puts strain on muscles that stretch to accommodate your back's curved position. This hunched shape also shrinks your chest cavity while you sit, meaning your lungs have less space to expand into when you ______. That's a problem because it temporarily ______ the amount of oxygen that fills your _____ and filters into your blood. Around the skeleton are the muscles, nerves, arteries and veins that form the body's soft tissue layers. The very act of sitting ________, pressurizes and compresses, and these more delicate _______ really feel the brunt. Have you ever experienced numbness and swelling in your _____ when you sit? In areas that are the most compressed, your nerves, arteries and veins can become blocked, which limits _____ signaling, causing the numbness, and reduces blood flow in your limbs, causing them to swell. Sitting for long _______ also temporarily ___________ lipoprotein lipase, a special enzyme in the walls of _____ capillaries that breaks down fats in the blood, so when you sit, you're not burning fat nearly as well as when you move around. What effect does all of this ______ have on the brain? Most of the time, you probably sit down to use your brain, but ironically, lengthy periods of sitting actually run counter to this goal. Being stationary reduces blood flow and the ______ of oxygen entering your blood stream through your lungs. Your brain requires both of those things to remain _____, so your concentration levels will most likely dip as your brain activity _____. Unfortunately, the ill effects of being seated don't only exist in the short term. Recent studies have found that _______ for long periods is linked with some types of cancers and heart disease and can contribute to diabetes, kidney and liver problems. In fact, researchers have worked out that, worldwide, inactivity causes about 9% of premature ______ a year. That's over 5 million people. So what seems like such a ________ _____ actually has the power to change our health. But _______, the solutions to this mounting threat are ______ and _________. When you have no choice but to sit, try _________ the slouch for a __________ _____, and when you don't have to be bound to your seat, aim to move around much more, perhaps by setting a reminder to yourself to get up every half hour. But mostly, just appreciate that bodies are built for motion, not for stillness. In fact, since the video's almost over, why not stand up and stretch right now? Treat your body to a walk. It'll thank you later.

Solution

  1. joints
  2. discs
  3. enable
  4. lungs
  5. bodies
  6. recover
  7. breath
  8. structured
  9. switching
  10. depends
  11. periods
  12. slows
  13. sitting
  14. luckily
  15. amount
  16. stasis
  17. properly
  18. deactivates
  19. start
  20. simple
  21. cartilage
  22. squashes
  23. limits
  24. stand
  25. minutes
  26. blood
  27. limbs
  28. benefit
  29. habit
  30. straighter
  31. intuitive
  32. position
  33. nerve
  34. deaths
  35. built
  36. alert
  37. ligaments
  38. harmless
  39. motions
  40. longer
  41. nowadays
  42. spine
  43. tissues

Original Text

Right now, you're probably sitting down to watch this video and staying seated for a few minutes to view it is probably okay. But the longer you stay put, the more agitated your body becomes. It sits there counting down the moments until you stand up again and take it for a walk. That may sound ridiculous. Our bodies love to sit, right? Not really. Sure, sitting for brief periods can help us recover from stress or recuperate from exercise. But nowadays, our lifestyles make us sit much more than we move around, and our bodies simply aren't built for such a sedentary existence. In fact, just the opposite is true. The human body is built to move, and you can see evidence of that in the way it's structured. Inside us are over 360 joints, and about 700 skeletal muscles that enable easy, fluid motion. The body's unique physical structure gives us the ability to stand up straight against the pull of gravity. Our blood depends on us moving around to be able to circulate properly. Our nerve cells benefit from movement, and our skin is elastic, meaning it molds to our motions. So if every inch of the body is ready and waiting for you to move, what happens when you just don't? Let's start with the backbone of the problem, literally. Your spine is a long structure made of bones and the cartilage discs that sit between them. Joints, muscles and ligaments that are attached to the bones hold it all together. A common way of sitting is with a curved back and slumped shoulders, a position that puts uneven pressure on your spine. Over time, this causes wear and tear in your spinal discs, overworks certain ligaments and joints, and puts strain on muscles that stretch to accommodate your back's curved position. This hunched shape also shrinks your chest cavity while you sit, meaning your lungs have less space to expand into when you breath. That's a problem because it temporarily limits the amount of oxygen that fills your lungs and filters into your blood. Around the skeleton are the muscles, nerves, arteries and veins that form the body's soft tissue layers. The very act of sitting squashes, pressurizes and compresses, and these more delicate tissues really feel the brunt. Have you ever experienced numbness and swelling in your limbs when you sit? In areas that are the most compressed, your nerves, arteries and veins can become blocked, which limits nerve signaling, causing the numbness, and reduces blood flow in your limbs, causing them to swell. Sitting for long periods also temporarily deactivates lipoprotein lipase, a special enzyme in the walls of blood capillaries that breaks down fats in the blood, so when you sit, you're not burning fat nearly as well as when you move around. What effect does all of this stasis have on the brain? Most of the time, you probably sit down to use your brain, but ironically, lengthy periods of sitting actually run counter to this goal. Being stationary reduces blood flow and the amount of oxygen entering your blood stream through your lungs. Your brain requires both of those things to remain alert, so your concentration levels will most likely dip as your brain activity slows. Unfortunately, the ill effects of being seated don't only exist in the short term. Recent studies have found that sitting for long periods is linked with some types of cancers and heart disease and can contribute to diabetes, kidney and liver problems. In fact, researchers have worked out that, worldwide, inactivity causes about 9% of premature deaths a year. That's over 5 million people. So what seems like such a harmless habit actually has the power to change our health. But luckily, the solutions to this mounting threat are simple and intuitive. When you have no choice but to sit, try switching the slouch for a straighter spine, and when you don't have to be bound to your seat, aim to move around much more, perhaps by setting a reminder to yourself to get up every half hour. But mostly, just appreciate that bodies are built for motion, not for stillness. In fact, since the video's almost over, why not stand up and stretch right now? Treat your body to a walk. It'll thank you later.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
reduces blood 2
blood flow 2
long periods 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
reduces blood flow 2

Important Words

  1. ability
  2. accommodate
  3. act
  4. activity
  5. agitated
  6. aim
  7. alert
  8. amount
  9. areas
  10. arteries
  11. attached
  12. backbone
  13. benefit
  14. blocked
  15. blood
  16. bodies
  17. body
  18. bones
  19. bound
  20. brain
  21. breaks
  22. breath
  23. brunt
  24. built
  25. burning
  26. cancers
  27. capillaries
  28. cartilage
  29. causing
  30. cavity
  31. cells
  32. change
  33. chest
  34. choice
  35. circulate
  36. common
  37. compressed
  38. compresses
  39. concentration
  40. contribute
  41. counter
  42. counting
  43. curved
  44. deactivates
  45. deaths
  46. delicate
  47. depends
  48. diabetes
  49. dip
  50. discs
  51. disease
  52. easy
  53. effect
  54. effects
  55. elastic
  56. enable
  57. entering
  58. enzyme
  59. evidence
  60. exercise
  61. exist
  62. existence
  63. expand
  64. experienced
  65. fact
  66. fat
  67. fats
  68. feel
  69. fills
  70. filters
  71. flow
  72. fluid
  73. form
  74. goal
  75. gravity
  76. habit
  77. harmless
  78. health
  79. heart
  80. hold
  81. hour
  82. human
  83. hunched
  84. ill
  85. inactivity
  86. inch
  87. intuitive
  88. ironically
  89. joints
  90. kidney
  91. layers
  92. lengthy
  93. levels
  94. lifestyles
  95. ligaments
  96. limbs
  97. limits
  98. linked
  99. lipase
  100. lipoprotein
  101. literally
  102. liver
  103. long
  104. longer
  105. love
  106. luckily
  107. lungs
  108. meaning
  109. million
  110. minutes
  111. molds
  112. moments
  113. motion
  114. motions
  115. mounting
  116. move
  117. movement
  118. moving
  119. muscles
  120. nerve
  121. nerves
  122. nowadays
  123. numbness
  124. overworks
  125. oxygen
  126. people
  127. periods
  128. physical
  129. position
  130. power
  131. premature
  132. pressure
  133. pressurizes
  134. problem
  135. problems
  136. properly
  137. pull
  138. put
  139. puts
  140. ready
  141. recover
  142. recuperate
  143. reduces
  144. remain
  145. reminder
  146. requires
  147. researchers
  148. ridiculous
  149. run
  150. seat
  151. seated
  152. sedentary
  153. setting
  154. shape
  155. short
  156. shoulders
  157. shrinks
  158. signaling
  159. simple
  160. simply
  161. sit
  162. sits
  163. sitting
  164. skeletal
  165. skeleton
  166. skin
  167. slouch
  168. slows
  169. slumped
  170. soft
  171. solutions
  172. sound
  173. space
  174. special
  175. spinal
  176. spine
  177. squashes
  178. stand
  179. start
  180. stasis
  181. stationary
  182. stay
  183. staying
  184. stillness
  185. straight
  186. straighter
  187. strain
  188. stream
  189. stress
  190. stretch
  191. structure
  192. structured
  193. studies
  194. swell
  195. swelling
  196. switching
  197. tear
  198. temporarily
  199. term
  200. threat
  201. time
  202. tissue
  203. tissues
  204. treat
  205. true
  206. types
  207. uneven
  208. unique
  209. veins
  210. video
  211. view
  212. waiting
  213. walk
  214. walls
  215. watch
  216. wear
  217. worked
  218. worldwide
  219. year