full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Yuko Morita: Why we need more dogs in hospitals

Unscramble the Blue Letters

(dtriiceng Bailey in English) Hello, everyone. My name is Yuko mitroa. This is a facility dog, Bailey. When you were a kid, were you aafrid of getting shots? When you were getting a flu shot at school, you probably asked your friends, 'Did it hurt? Did it hurt?' As you know, kids are very afraid of icnetnojis or having their blood drawn. Hospitalised children have to have their blood darwn so many times. Some kids need bone-marrow aspirations by drilling a thick needle into their spine. This dog, Bailey has the mgiaacl power to make these kids say: 'If Bailey is with me, I would put up with it 100 more times'. He is such a competent dog. The Japanese medical level is said to be top-notch, for curing diseases. But in Japan, while 'to be patient' has been considered a vtriue, it is said that the quality of hospitalised life is poorly supported. I used to work as a rtieserged nurse at a children's hospital in Tokyo. One day a mhetor of a hospitalised kid said, 'This is almost like being in jail'. I was thinking that I was working very hard for the children, and I was very shocked to hear that. In fact, kids in the hospital are not sseopupd to go out even for a walk. They are not allowed to have their favourite fdoos. They barely have fun. Some kids stop smiling. When I think back about it, it might as well be called a jail. At that time, I was with an NPO called 'Shine On! Kids' and they offered to let me become a hanledr of a service dog. The Non-Profit Organisation was founded to emotionally support kids and their families who are suffering from childhood cancer and other incurable diseases. At that time, I only knew that a dog is taken to a children's hospital and the dog works as a member of the medical staff — there were a nebmur of facility dogs working in Europe and the US, yet obiously none in Japan; that was all I knew about facility dogs. I thought 'If a svircee dog were working in this ward, the children's hospital life, once called a jail, would be way happier', and I was excited to think so. Without hesitation I said, 'Yes, I would love to'. There is no training institutions for facility dog program in Japan. Both Bailey and I were trained at a haiaawin training cntree. In a children's hospital in Hawaii, we also practiced following around our sioner facility dog and their handler. To my surprise, the service dog went into the ICU. The intensive-care unit is where seriously ill patients are taken care of. There was a child who had just gotten out of surgery with their head half-shaven, and a large scar on their head. The kid was fworing painfully. To my great concern, 'Is it really OK to go there in such a serious situation?' the fatilicy dog went in there, and climbed on the bed right beside the kid laying with the tebus around them, and went to sleep alongside the kid. Then the kid grew relaxed. In spite of all the pain of moving, the kid hegugd the dog and closed their eyes. The kid looked so calm and easy. At the sight of it, I thouhgt ’WOW, that's cool!’ Being etxcied about mankig all the hospital wards full of smiles, I came back to Japan with Bailey. However, facility dogs are totally unprecedented in Japan. The Western mindset for dogs is totally different from that of Japan. In Europe and the US, it's been quite normal to have dogs in the house as family members. On the other hand, in Japan, we have a history of having them outside. It is oeruutgoas to have a dog inside the hospital ward: that was what Japanese hospitals thought. Before us, sometimes there were dogs volunteered to visit hospitals in Japan. But there was not a pendecert of having a dog in hospital eyvaredy, and considering dogs as a medical staff. What was right in Hawaii was far from right in jpaan. We desperately looked for a hoatipsl that could accept Bailey as a sftaf. Then eventually we were accepted by the Shizuoka Children's Hospital. But the reality was that people said; 'Can't the dog be reaelpcd with a dog robot?' or 'To protect kids against infections, do not enter this ward'. At first we could eentr only one ward. So one-day of rounds was finished in a few minutes. We got to the workplace and an hour later, it was time to go home. 'I don't think Japanese culture is going to make people want to apdot a facility dog programme', I could only think in a ngetvaie way. But in fact, children needed Bailey. Five years have passed, and now we are accepted by almost all wadrs. Bailey brings about positive differences to both kids and their families', — that was what doctors and nsures started to notice. There was a child who was visually impaired and was always screaming in panic when they had their boold collected. But with Bailey by their side, they were distracted by petting Bailey on the head, the kid could go through blood tests without crying. Another kid who wouldn’t move at all due to pain after sregury suddenly got up just because they wanted to see Bailey. That was a big sispurre to the doctor. A family, who are suddenly told that their child has caecnr, will pretend as if nothing hpianepng to prevent their kid from being nervous. But people cannot suppress their feelings for good. Sometimes it is important to cry. With somebody who is human, they would feel a need 'to say something'. But to Bailey, they never have to say anything if they do not want to. I saw a mother in a hospital corridor, after hugging Bailey, crying as she wanted and with a relaxed expression, she went back to her kid's bed. Bailey was a pvositie influence for their families, too. Then I found there are three important bonds for a facility dog. One is a bond between Bailey and the kids, another is Bailey and his handler, and the other is Bailey and the medical staff. These are three important bonds with Bailey. The first bond is: as Bailey wkors at the same hospital everyday, he sees the same children many times. For children, just having a dog is not good enough. Bailey, who comes to them everyday, really matters. Only with Bailey who has bndos with the kids, can they be courageous enough to hang in there. Even with a dog phobia, almost all kids will come to like baeily eventually. For kids, Bailey is a teatamme with a tail who fight against their illness. Bailey can even enter the surgical terathe with a child. Even an adult is scared of getting an operation, right? Wondering 'Does it hurt?', or felenig scared, they have to spend the terrifying time from the ward to the theatre. But holding Bailey's leash, walking with him, cdlhiern can gdiue Bailey smiling and walking to the theatre. It is a privilege walk with everyone's favourite Bailey, without anyone else! Some kids walk playfully around Bailey's fluffy tail as if they are cats. Some kids say smiling, 'Bailey's wagging his tail means Good Luck'. In this way, scary feelings turn to exciting feelings; which encourages kids to go to the theatre.

Open Cloze

(_________ Bailey in English) Hello, everyone. My name is Yuko ______. This is a facility dog, Bailey. When you were a kid, were you ______ of getting shots? When you were getting a flu shot at school, you probably asked your friends, 'Did it hurt? Did it hurt?' As you know, kids are very afraid of __________ or having their blood drawn. Hospitalised children have to have their blood _____ so many times. Some kids need bone-marrow aspirations by drilling a thick needle into their spine. This dog, Bailey has the _______ power to make these kids say: 'If Bailey is with me, I would put up with it 100 more times'. He is such a competent dog. The Japanese medical level is said to be top-notch, for curing diseases. But in Japan, while 'to be patient' has been considered a ______, it is said that the quality of hospitalised life is poorly supported. I used to work as a __________ nurse at a children's hospital in Tokyo. One day a ______ of a hospitalised kid said, 'This is almost like being in jail'. I was thinking that I was working very hard for the children, and I was very shocked to hear that. In fact, kids in the hospital are not ________ to go out even for a walk. They are not allowed to have their favourite _____. They barely have fun. Some kids stop smiling. When I think back about it, it might as well be called a jail. At that time, I was with an NPO called 'Shine On! Kids' and they offered to let me become a _______ of a service dog. The Non-Profit Organisation was founded to emotionally support kids and their families who are suffering from childhood cancer and other incurable diseases. At that time, I only knew that a dog is taken to a children's hospital and the dog works as a member of the medical staff — there were a ______ of facility dogs working in Europe and the US, yet obiously none in Japan; that was all I knew about facility dogs. I thought 'If a _______ dog were working in this ward, the children's hospital life, once called a jail, would be way happier', and I was excited to think so. Without hesitation I said, 'Yes, I would love to'. There is no training institutions for facility dog program in Japan. Both Bailey and I were trained at a ________ training ______. In a children's hospital in Hawaii, we also practiced following around our ______ facility dog and their handler. To my surprise, the service dog went into the ICU. The intensive-care unit is where seriously ill patients are taken care of. There was a child who had just gotten out of surgery with their head half-shaven, and a large scar on their head. The kid was _______ painfully. To my great concern, 'Is it really OK to go there in such a serious situation?' the ________ dog went in there, and climbed on the bed right beside the kid laying with the _____ around them, and went to sleep alongside the kid. Then the kid grew relaxed. In spite of all the pain of moving, the kid ______ the dog and closed their eyes. The kid looked so calm and easy. At the sight of it, I _______ ’WOW, that's cool!’ Being _______ about ______ all the hospital wards full of smiles, I came back to Japan with Bailey. However, facility dogs are totally unprecedented in Japan. The Western mindset for dogs is totally different from that of Japan. In Europe and the US, it's been quite normal to have dogs in the house as family members. On the other hand, in Japan, we have a history of having them outside. It is __________ to have a dog inside the hospital ward: that was what Japanese hospitals thought. Before us, sometimes there were dogs volunteered to visit hospitals in Japan. But there was not a _________ of having a dog in hospital ________, and considering dogs as a medical staff. What was right in Hawaii was far from right in _____. We desperately looked for a ________ that could accept Bailey as a _____. Then eventually we were accepted by the Shizuoka Children's Hospital. But the reality was that people said; 'Can't the dog be ________ with a dog robot?' or 'To protect kids against infections, do not enter this ward'. At first we could _____ only one ward. So one-day of rounds was finished in a few minutes. We got to the workplace and an hour later, it was time to go home. 'I don't think Japanese culture is going to make people want to _____ a facility dog programme', I could only think in a ________ way. But in fact, children needed Bailey. Five years have passed, and now we are accepted by almost all _____. Bailey brings about positive differences to both kids and their families', — that was what doctors and ______ started to notice. There was a child who was visually impaired and was always screaming in panic when they had their _____ collected. But with Bailey by their side, they were distracted by petting Bailey on the head, the kid could go through blood tests without crying. Another kid who wouldn’t move at all due to pain after _______ suddenly got up just because they wanted to see Bailey. That was a big ________ to the doctor. A family, who are suddenly told that their child has ______, will pretend as if nothing _________ to prevent their kid from being nervous. But people cannot suppress their feelings for good. Sometimes it is important to cry. With somebody who is human, they would feel a need 'to say something'. But to Bailey, they never have to say anything if they do not want to. I saw a mother in a hospital corridor, after hugging Bailey, crying as she wanted and with a relaxed expression, she went back to her kid's bed. Bailey was a ________ influence for their families, too. Then I found there are three important bonds for a facility dog. One is a bond between Bailey and the kids, another is Bailey and his handler, and the other is Bailey and the medical staff. These are three important bonds with Bailey. The first bond is: as Bailey _____ at the same hospital everyday, he sees the same children many times. For children, just having a dog is not good enough. Bailey, who comes to them everyday, really matters. Only with Bailey who has _____ with the kids, can they be courageous enough to hang in there. Even with a dog phobia, almost all kids will come to like ______ eventually. For kids, Bailey is a ________ with a tail who fight against their illness. Bailey can even enter the surgical _______ with a child. Even an adult is scared of getting an operation, right? Wondering 'Does it hurt?', or _______ scared, they have to spend the terrifying time from the ward to the theatre. But holding Bailey's leash, walking with him, ________ can _____ Bailey smiling and walking to the theatre. It is a privilege walk with everyone's favourite Bailey, without anyone else! Some kids walk playfully around Bailey's fluffy tail as if they are cats. Some kids say smiling, 'Bailey's wagging his tail means Good Luck'. In this way, scary feelings turn to exciting feelings; which encourages kids to go to the theatre.

Solution

  1. service
  2. outrageous
  3. wards
  4. hawaiian
  5. foods
  6. afraid
  7. negative
  8. drawn
  9. happening
  10. surprise
  11. works
  12. hugged
  13. supposed
  14. teammate
  15. staff
  16. positive
  17. everyday
  18. mother
  19. registered
  20. frowing
  21. guide
  22. nurses
  23. centre
  24. cancer
  25. morita
  26. precedent
  27. bonds
  28. thought
  29. theatre
  30. blood
  31. replaced
  32. virtue
  33. bailey
  34. tubes
  35. facility
  36. feeling
  37. adopt
  38. number
  39. surgery
  40. injections
  41. hospital
  42. enter
  43. handler
  44. children
  45. making
  46. excited
  47. japan
  48. directing
  49. senior
  50. magical

Original Text

(Directing Bailey in English) Hello, everyone. My name is Yuko Morita. This is a facility dog, Bailey. When you were a kid, were you afraid of getting shots? When you were getting a flu shot at school, you probably asked your friends, 'Did it hurt? Did it hurt?' As you know, kids are very afraid of injections or having their blood drawn. Hospitalised children have to have their blood drawn so many times. Some kids need bone-marrow aspirations by drilling a thick needle into their spine. This dog, Bailey has the magical power to make these kids say: 'If Bailey is with me, I would put up with it 100 more times'. He is such a competent dog. The Japanese medical level is said to be top-notch, for curing diseases. But in Japan, while 'to be patient' has been considered a virtue, it is said that the quality of hospitalised life is poorly supported. I used to work as a registered nurse at a children's hospital in Tokyo. One day a mother of a hospitalised kid said, 'This is almost like being in jail'. I was thinking that I was working very hard for the children, and I was very shocked to hear that. In fact, kids in the hospital are not supposed to go out even for a walk. They are not allowed to have their favourite foods. They barely have fun. Some kids stop smiling. When I think back about it, it might as well be called a jail. At that time, I was with an NPO called 'Shine On! Kids' and they offered to let me become a handler of a service dog. The Non-Profit Organisation was founded to emotionally support kids and their families who are suffering from childhood cancer and other incurable diseases. At that time, I only knew that a dog is taken to a children's hospital and the dog works as a member of the medical staff — there were a number of facility dogs working in Europe and the US, yet obiously none in Japan; that was all I knew about facility dogs. I thought 'If a service dog were working in this ward, the children's hospital life, once called a jail, would be way happier', and I was excited to think so. Without hesitation I said, 'Yes, I would love to'. There is no training institutions for facility dog program in Japan. Both Bailey and I were trained at a Hawaiian training centre. In a children's hospital in Hawaii, we also practiced following around our senior facility dog and their handler. To my surprise, the service dog went into the ICU. The intensive-care unit is where seriously ill patients are taken care of. There was a child who had just gotten out of surgery with their head half-shaven, and a large scar on their head. The kid was frowing painfully. To my great concern, 'Is it really OK to go there in such a serious situation?' the facility dog went in there, and climbed on the bed right beside the kid laying with the tubes around them, and went to sleep alongside the kid. Then the kid grew relaxed. In spite of all the pain of moving, the kid hugged the dog and closed their eyes. The kid looked so calm and easy. At the sight of it, I thought ’WOW, that's cool!’ Being excited about making all the hospital wards full of smiles, I came back to Japan with Bailey. However, facility dogs are totally unprecedented in Japan. The Western mindset for dogs is totally different from that of Japan. In Europe and the US, it's been quite normal to have dogs in the house as family members. On the other hand, in Japan, we have a history of having them outside. It is outrageous to have a dog inside the hospital ward: that was what Japanese hospitals thought. Before us, sometimes there were dogs volunteered to visit hospitals in Japan. But there was not a precedent of having a dog in hospital everyday, and considering dogs as a medical staff. What was right in Hawaii was far from right in Japan. We desperately looked for a hospital that could accept Bailey as a staff. Then eventually we were accepted by the Shizuoka Children's Hospital. But the reality was that people said; 'Can't the dog be replaced with a dog robot?' or 'To protect kids against infections, do not enter this ward'. At first we could enter only one ward. So one-day of rounds was finished in a few minutes. We got to the workplace and an hour later, it was time to go home. 'I don't think Japanese culture is going to make people want to adopt a facility dog programme', I could only think in a negative way. But in fact, children needed Bailey. Five years have passed, and now we are accepted by almost all wards. Bailey brings about positive differences to both kids and their families', — that was what doctors and nurses started to notice. There was a child who was visually impaired and was always screaming in panic when they had their blood collected. But with Bailey by their side, they were distracted by petting Bailey on the head, the kid could go through blood tests without crying. Another kid who wouldn’t move at all due to pain after surgery suddenly got up just because they wanted to see Bailey. That was a big surprise to the doctor. A family, who are suddenly told that their child has cancer, will pretend as if nothing happening to prevent their kid from being nervous. But people cannot suppress their feelings for good. Sometimes it is important to cry. With somebody who is human, they would feel a need 'to say something'. But to Bailey, they never have to say anything if they do not want to. I saw a mother in a hospital corridor, after hugging Bailey, crying as she wanted and with a relaxed expression, she went back to her kid's bed. Bailey was a positive influence for their families, too. Then I found there are three important bonds for a facility dog. One is a bond between Bailey and the kids, another is Bailey and his handler, and the other is Bailey and the medical staff. These are three important bonds with Bailey. The first bond is: as Bailey works at the same hospital everyday, he sees the same children many times. For children, just having a dog is not good enough. Bailey, who comes to them everyday, really matters. Only with Bailey who has bonds with the kids, can they be courageous enough to hang in there. Even with a dog phobia, almost all kids will come to like Bailey eventually. For kids, Bailey is a teammate with a tail who fight against their illness. Bailey can even enter the surgical theatre with a child. Even an adult is scared of getting an operation, right? Wondering 'Does it hurt?', or feeling scared, they have to spend the terrifying time from the ward to the theatre. But holding Bailey's leash, walking with him, children can guide Bailey smiling and walking to the theatre. It is a privilege walk with everyone's favourite Bailey, without anyone else! Some kids walk playfully around Bailey's fluffy tail as if they are cats. Some kids say smiling, 'Bailey's wagging his tail means Good Luck'. In this way, scary feelings turn to exciting feelings; which encourages kids to go to the theatre.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
facility dog 13
medical staff 7
facility dogs 6
service dog 3
japanese hospitals 3
blood drawn 2
japanese medical 2
dog works 2
important bonds 2

Important Words

  1. accept
  2. accepted
  3. adopt
  4. adult
  5. afraid
  6. allowed
  7. asked
  8. aspirations
  9. bailey
  10. barely
  11. bed
  12. big
  13. blood
  14. bond
  15. bonds
  16. brings
  17. called
  18. calm
  19. cancer
  20. care
  21. cats
  22. centre
  23. child
  24. childhood
  25. children
  26. climbed
  27. closed
  28. collected
  29. competent
  30. concern
  31. considered
  32. corridor
  33. courageous
  34. cry
  35. crying
  36. culture
  37. curing
  38. day
  39. desperately
  40. differences
  41. directing
  42. diseases
  43. distracted
  44. doctor
  45. doctors
  46. dog
  47. dogs
  48. drawn
  49. drilling
  50. due
  51. easy
  52. emotionally
  53. encourages
  54. english
  55. enter
  56. europe
  57. eventually
  58. everyday
  59. excited
  60. exciting
  61. expression
  62. eyes
  63. facility
  64. fact
  65. families
  66. family
  67. favourite
  68. feel
  69. feeling
  70. feelings
  71. fight
  72. finished
  73. flu
  74. fluffy
  75. foods
  76. founded
  77. friends
  78. frowing
  79. full
  80. fun
  81. good
  82. great
  83. grew
  84. guide
  85. hand
  86. handler
  87. hang
  88. happening
  89. hard
  90. hawaii
  91. hawaiian
  92. head
  93. hear
  94. hesitation
  95. history
  96. holding
  97. home
  98. hospital
  99. hospitalised
  100. hospitals
  101. hour
  102. house
  103. hugged
  104. hugging
  105. human
  106. hurt
  107. icu
  108. ill
  109. illness
  110. impaired
  111. important
  112. incurable
  113. infections
  114. influence
  115. injections
  116. institutions
  117. jail
  118. japan
  119. japanese
  120. kid
  121. kids
  122. knew
  123. large
  124. laying
  125. leash
  126. level
  127. life
  128. looked
  129. love
  130. magical
  131. making
  132. matters
  133. means
  134. medical
  135. member
  136. members
  137. mindset
  138. minutes
  139. morita
  140. mother
  141. move
  142. moving
  143. needed
  144. needle
  145. negative
  146. nervous
  147. normal
  148. notice
  149. npo
  150. number
  151. nurse
  152. nurses
  153. obiously
  154. offered
  155. operation
  156. organisation
  157. outrageous
  158. pain
  159. painfully
  160. panic
  161. passed
  162. patients
  163. people
  164. petting
  165. phobia
  166. playfully
  167. poorly
  168. positive
  169. power
  170. practiced
  171. precedent
  172. pretend
  173. prevent
  174. privilege
  175. program
  176. protect
  177. put
  178. quality
  179. reality
  180. registered
  181. relaxed
  182. replaced
  183. robot
  184. rounds
  185. scar
  186. scared
  187. scary
  188. school
  189. screaming
  190. sees
  191. senior
  192. service
  193. shizuoka
  194. shocked
  195. shot
  196. shots
  197. side
  198. sight
  199. situation
  200. sleep
  201. smiles
  202. smiling
  203. spend
  204. spine
  205. spite
  206. staff
  207. started
  208. stop
  209. suddenly
  210. suffering
  211. support
  212. supported
  213. supposed
  214. suppress
  215. surgery
  216. surgical
  217. surprise
  218. tail
  219. teammate
  220. terrifying
  221. tests
  222. theatre
  223. thick
  224. thinking
  225. thought
  226. time
  227. times
  228. tokyo
  229. told
  230. totally
  231. trained
  232. training
  233. tubes
  234. turn
  235. unit
  236. unprecedented
  237. virtue
  238. visit
  239. visually
  240. volunteered
  241. wagging
  242. walk
  243. walking
  244. wanted
  245. ward
  246. wards
  247. western
  248. wondering
  249. work
  250. working
  251. workplace
  252. works
  253. years
  254. yuko