full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Jacy Reese Anthis: Why we should end animal agriculture

Unscramble the Blue Letters

one we can tackle with the tools of Effective Altruism ... their growing mindset in chatriy, business and politics of using evidence-based research to find and inpeemmlt the most effective solutions to the world's biggest problems. The most powerful tool we have is innovation. The amazing thing is that we don't have to give up meat, dairy, or eggs to end anmial farming. Think about it: what's meat? It's fat, protein, wetar and trace minerals. All these ingredients are rialdey available in the pnlat kingdom. They're just not assembled in the architecture of meat. That's what a cow does. But a cow also does a lot of stuff we don't need. She gowrs hair, teeth, bones. She walks around; she breathes, tkinhs, and feels. These extra processes mean that for every 10 calories of plant-based food we feed a farmed animal, we get around 1 calorie of meat in return. Even with the nutrient animal pdotcurs are most known for, protein, for every 10 grams of plant-based, we get, at most, 2 grams of animal-based. So what if we assembled these ingredients ourselves with a more eeiinffct, ethical pocrses? That's the approach of companies like Beyond Meat, Hungry Planet, and Impossible Foods. They've already succeeded in making a beef burger made from plants. Many consumers can't even tell the difference. Today, they're just ptreicnefg that product and scaling up the process to lower costs and widen duobittirsin. In fact, the Beyond breugr pictured here is already available in Mississippi. But let's be coutuais. What if csuermnos are really picky? What if they don't just want something that tastes like animal meat, but something that is actually made from animal cells? Well, there's good news. Scientists and chefs have been working on so-called clean meat, real meat made without the food safety and ethical cost of animal slaughter. To do this, they take a slaml sample of cells from a living animal and place those cells in a catilutovr, which looks like one of the big tanks at a beer brrewey. Inside, the cells mix with the nutrients they need to grow in the same process that happens inside an animal's body, and voila! You can have your cow and eat beef too. (Laughter) But you might be thinking, "Not all bniiaecefl technologies are widely adopted, right? So what if something goes wrong? What if the technology is fully developed, but perceived as just another food for vegetarians? Or what if an irresponsible company lets their procudt get contaminated, leading to a cascade of negative press that cripples the indtsruy?" With conventional meat, we see contamination scandals all the time, but for a young industry like clean meat, it could be fatal. It's like self-driving cars, where the industry needs to be especially careful about collisions, despite having an overall better safety record. So what saicol change will we see on our way to an animal-free food system? The biggest one is a shift beyond the individual and towards institutional cnahge. Like I said earlier, advocates have thus far focused hivlaey on one-by-one diet change, but I believe we'll see the biggest changes happen with changes to institutions like businesses, government, nonprofits and society as a whole. There's a lot of evidence that this strategy is more effective. Last year, I was at a petsort, calling for a restaurant cahin to reform its animal-welfare policies, just basic stuff, like choosing hetahelir breeds of chickens, or having windows in the chicken sheds. A pedestrian walked up and thanked me profusely for helping these poor animals. I told him he was welcome to join us, as bystanders sometimes do, and he said, "Oh no, no, no. I can't. I'm not a vegetarian." I insisted that he was welcome to join us without being vaireetagn. We were just calling for better tmatneert for these animals. But he was unconvinced. He saw vegetarianism as a prerequisite to helping farmed animals because advocates have conflated the two for so long. If we had, instead, used an iunsiotittanl finarmg, that bystander might have jeiond us and maybe become vegetarian along the way. This strategy also hpels people avoid what psychologists call "the collapse of compassion," the feeling of apathy that comes when we encounter a big pborelm without clearly seeing the big silouton. The institutional framing puts that solution, changing seotciy as a whole, front and center in our messaging. This strategy is also well-evidenced by hitcaisorl social movements, which is what I spend most of my time rneiesahcrg. Virtually no movements - from environmentalism, children's rights, antislavery, feminism to antiwar movements - have succeeded with the heavy, individual focus that we see in the farmed-animal movement. Consumer advocacy like boycotts have succeeded when used as tools for institutional change, but failed when treated as an end goal. We need to learn from the past. The second big change is a shift beyond opposition to factory farming alone and towards oiipootpsn to animal farming as whole. There's a lot of evidence for this strategy too. First, numorues investigations have shown that so-called humane farms are rarely humane in practice. The most picturesque farm I've ever been on was an award-winning California egg farm. But because of the farm's natural and organic policies, they didn't vaccinate the birds or give them acnbtiiiots, like factory farms do. This led to aoiotcurs hatleh. I saw many cases of Marek's, a highly contagious dissaee that often lades to blindness and missing eyes; fulid belly, some birds with over a pound of fluid buildup inside their less than five-pound bodies; fungal infections; lice on almost all of them; and many birds crippled by eggs that had gotten stuck inside them on the way out. I've been dismayed that the reality of these farms is nearly as bad as factory farming. While reduction in suirfnfeg is something we should applaud, and it can be a step towards abolition, the unmitigated suffering is still a moral catastrophe. Second, simply the idea that there are humane ways to raise and kill animals for food is a huge roadblock, even if you just oppose factory fimnarg. Seventy-five percent of people think they usually eat meat from animals who were treated humanely, but as we saw earlier, less than 1% of farmed animals actually live on non-factory fmras. That's crazy, right? Why are consumers so confused? Well, when we eat animals, there's a cognitive dasnncsioe that claws at us because deep down, we care about animals too. What seems to happen is that our ssncuoicubos protects us from this dissonance by creating a psychological refuge. It tells us that, actually, everything is okay, that farmed aalnims are treated well, even when the facts point in the opposite direction. This mistaken belief ptoertcs us from the conflict between our values and our behavior. And the misleading labels on animal products, like pureitcs of green pastures on crtnaos of factory farm eggs, exacerbate this issue. Finally, these farms are just too expensive to feed this hungry planet. So-called humane animal products are already several times the normal price. Many of us just can't afford that. And the demand on natural resources is just too much for this paenlt to bear, especially when we can get the same foods from more sustainable sources. Fortunately, the future is bright. Today, we're at an inflection point, where the moral reasons to change our food system are very compelling. tlcogenhoy is on its way and elelencxt aaietrveltns are already here, and advocates are wising up to more impactful strategies. It's incredibly empowering to have this wealth of evidence available, from history, psychology and elsewhere, to analyze using the effective artiulsm pipsevrecte. Ultimately, that evidence ssguetgs that we can achieve a truly humane food system if we strive towards the end of animal farming. And plibuc onipoin is already a lot further along on this than you might think. Forty-seven pecnret of US adults already say they spuport a ban on slaughter houses. As we transition, as we align our food system with our values, we're going to see a sweeping change in the relationship between humans and the other inaanttbihs of this planet. Once we're no longer eniatg animals three times a day, we'll see a huge rielef in cognitive dissonance that frees our conecscnie to enxpad our moral circle to not just farmed animals, but other populations like dogs and cats in shelters, animals used in circuses and entertainment, and the vast nemubr of wild animals who also need our help. Today, we're laying the foundation for fuurte social motnmeevs just as social movements of the past laid the bedrock we now stand on. Richard Branson predicted that the food system will be animal-free in just 30 yaers. It might take a little longer than that, but it's clear that huge change is coming. You can stand on the right side of history and play a role in this exciting movement, whether it's by starting a business like a local restaurant or a clean-meat cpoamny, becoming an activist, making a diotnaon, or simply sharing content on social media. You can, of course, also participate as a ccoonusis consumer, but keep in mind that your own diet choice is just one of many ways to have an impact. This is a time of unbridled excitement and opportunity, as we look ahead at one of the next great social movements. Humanity's moral clicre will continue to expand, but only if plopee like you and me take hold. Thank you. (asappule)

Open Cloze

one we can tackle with the tools of Effective Altruism ... their growing mindset in _______, business and politics of using evidence-based research to find and _________ the most effective solutions to the world's biggest problems. The most powerful tool we have is innovation. The amazing thing is that we don't have to give up meat, dairy, or eggs to end ______ farming. Think about it: what's meat? It's fat, protein, _____ and trace minerals. All these ingredients are _______ available in the _____ kingdom. They're just not assembled in the architecture of meat. That's what a cow does. But a cow also does a lot of stuff we don't need. She _____ hair, teeth, bones. She walks around; she breathes, ______, and feels. These extra processes mean that for every 10 calories of plant-based food we feed a farmed animal, we get around 1 calorie of meat in return. Even with the nutrient animal ________ are most known for, protein, for every 10 grams of plant-based, we get, at most, 2 grams of animal-based. So what if we assembled these ingredients ourselves with a more _________, ethical _______? That's the approach of companies like Beyond Meat, Hungry Planet, and Impossible Foods. They've already succeeded in making a beef burger made from plants. Many consumers can't even tell the difference. Today, they're just __________ that product and scaling up the process to lower costs and widen ____________. In fact, the Beyond ______ pictured here is already available in Mississippi. But let's be ________. What if _________ are really picky? What if they don't just want something that tastes like animal meat, but something that is actually made from animal cells? Well, there's good news. Scientists and chefs have been working on so-called clean meat, real meat made without the food safety and ethical cost of animal slaughter. To do this, they take a _____ sample of cells from a living animal and place those cells in a __________, which looks like one of the big tanks at a beer _______. Inside, the cells mix with the nutrients they need to grow in the same process that happens inside an animal's body, and voila! You can have your cow and eat beef too. (Laughter) But you might be thinking, "Not all __________ technologies are widely adopted, right? So what if something goes wrong? What if the technology is fully developed, but perceived as just another food for vegetarians? Or what if an irresponsible company lets their _______ get contaminated, leading to a cascade of negative press that cripples the ________?" With conventional meat, we see contamination scandals all the time, but for a young industry like clean meat, it could be fatal. It's like self-driving cars, where the industry needs to be especially careful about collisions, despite having an overall better safety record. So what ______ change will we see on our way to an animal-free food system? The biggest one is a shift beyond the individual and towards institutional ______. Like I said earlier, advocates have thus far focused _______ on one-by-one diet change, but I believe we'll see the biggest changes happen with changes to institutions like businesses, government, nonprofits and society as a whole. There's a lot of evidence that this strategy is more effective. Last year, I was at a _______, calling for a restaurant _____ to reform its animal-welfare policies, just basic stuff, like choosing _________ breeds of chickens, or having windows in the chicken sheds. A pedestrian walked up and thanked me profusely for helping these poor animals. I told him he was welcome to join us, as bystanders sometimes do, and he said, "Oh no, no, no. I can't. I'm not a vegetarian." I insisted that he was welcome to join us without being __________. We were just calling for better _________ for these animals. But he was unconvinced. He saw vegetarianism as a prerequisite to helping farmed animals because advocates have conflated the two for so long. If we had, instead, used an _____________ _______, that bystander might have ______ us and maybe become vegetarian along the way. This strategy also _____ people avoid what psychologists call "the collapse of compassion," the feeling of apathy that comes when we encounter a big _______ without clearly seeing the big ________. The institutional framing puts that solution, changing _______ as a whole, front and center in our messaging. This strategy is also well-evidenced by __________ social movements, which is what I spend most of my time ___________. Virtually no movements - from environmentalism, children's rights, antislavery, feminism to antiwar movements - have succeeded with the heavy, individual focus that we see in the farmed-animal movement. Consumer advocacy like boycotts have succeeded when used as tools for institutional change, but failed when treated as an end goal. We need to learn from the past. The second big change is a shift beyond opposition to factory farming alone and towards __________ to animal farming as whole. There's a lot of evidence for this strategy too. First, ________ investigations have shown that so-called humane farms are rarely humane in practice. The most picturesque farm I've ever been on was an award-winning California egg farm. But because of the farm's natural and organic policies, they didn't vaccinate the birds or give them ___________, like factory farms do. This led to _________ ______. I saw many cases of Marek's, a highly contagious _______ that often _____ to blindness and missing eyes; _____ belly, some birds with over a pound of fluid buildup inside their less than five-pound bodies; fungal infections; lice on almost all of them; and many birds crippled by eggs that had gotten stuck inside them on the way out. I've been dismayed that the reality of these farms is nearly as bad as factory farming. While reduction in _________ is something we should applaud, and it can be a step towards abolition, the unmitigated suffering is still a moral catastrophe. Second, simply the idea that there are humane ways to raise and kill animals for food is a huge roadblock, even if you just oppose factory _______. Seventy-five percent of people think they usually eat meat from animals who were treated humanely, but as we saw earlier, less than 1% of farmed animals actually live on non-factory _____. That's crazy, right? Why are consumers so confused? Well, when we eat animals, there's a cognitive __________ that claws at us because deep down, we care about animals too. What seems to happen is that our ____________ protects us from this dissonance by creating a psychological refuge. It tells us that, actually, everything is okay, that farmed _______ are treated well, even when the facts point in the opposite direction. This mistaken belief ________ us from the conflict between our values and our behavior. And the misleading labels on animal products, like ________ of green pastures on _______ of factory farm eggs, exacerbate this issue. Finally, these farms are just too expensive to feed this hungry planet. So-called humane animal products are already several times the normal price. Many of us just can't afford that. And the demand on natural resources is just too much for this ______ to bear, especially when we can get the same foods from more sustainable sources. Fortunately, the future is bright. Today, we're at an inflection point, where the moral reasons to change our food system are very compelling. __________ is on its way and _________ ____________ are already here, and advocates are wising up to more impactful strategies. It's incredibly empowering to have this wealth of evidence available, from history, psychology and elsewhere, to analyze using the effective ________ ___________. Ultimately, that evidence ________ that we can achieve a truly humane food system if we strive towards the end of animal farming. And ______ _______ is already a lot further along on this than you might think. Forty-seven _______ of US adults already say they _______ a ban on slaughter houses. As we transition, as we align our food system with our values, we're going to see a sweeping change in the relationship between humans and the other ___________ of this planet. Once we're no longer ______ animals three times a day, we'll see a huge ______ in cognitive dissonance that frees our __________ to ______ our moral circle to not just farmed animals, but other populations like dogs and cats in shelters, animals used in circuses and entertainment, and the vast ______ of wild animals who also need our help. Today, we're laying the foundation for ______ social _________ just as social movements of the past laid the bedrock we now stand on. Richard Branson predicted that the food system will be animal-free in just 30 _____. It might take a little longer than that, but it's clear that huge change is coming. You can stand on the right side of history and play a role in this exciting movement, whether it's by starting a business like a local restaurant or a clean-meat _______, becoming an activist, making a ________, or simply sharing content on social media. You can, of course, also participate as a _________ consumer, but keep in mind that your own diet choice is just one of many ways to have an impact. This is a time of unbridled excitement and opportunity, as we look ahead at one of the next great social movements. Humanity's moral ______ will continue to expand, but only if ______ like you and me take hold. Thank you. (________)

Solution

  1. industry
  2. framing
  3. conscious
  4. animals
  5. consumers
  6. historical
  7. eating
  8. brewery
  9. company
  10. cautious
  11. distribution
  12. opinion
  13. change
  14. subconscious
  15. movements
  16. future
  17. alternatives
  18. planet
  19. pictures
  20. atrocious
  21. relief
  22. products
  23. perfecting
  24. vegetarian
  25. plant
  26. cartons
  27. heavily
  28. number
  29. burger
  30. dissonance
  31. beneficial
  32. percent
  33. researching
  34. disease
  35. problem
  36. excellent
  37. grows
  38. perspective
  39. animal
  40. public
  41. small
  42. numerous
  43. fluid
  44. technology
  45. donation
  46. product
  47. water
  48. treatment
  49. solution
  50. readily
  51. society
  52. process
  53. institutional
  54. years
  55. social
  56. thinks
  57. conscience
  58. circle
  59. health
  60. farms
  61. protects
  62. opposition
  63. chain
  64. charity
  65. efficient
  66. farming
  67. helps
  68. support
  69. healthier
  70. antibiotics
  71. suffering
  72. inhabitants
  73. protest
  74. applause
  75. people
  76. implement
  77. expand
  78. suggests
  79. joined
  80. cultivator
  81. leads
  82. altruism

Original Text

one we can tackle with the tools of Effective Altruism ... their growing mindset in charity, business and politics of using evidence-based research to find and implement the most effective solutions to the world's biggest problems. The most powerful tool we have is innovation. The amazing thing is that we don't have to give up meat, dairy, or eggs to end animal farming. Think about it: what's meat? It's fat, protein, water and trace minerals. All these ingredients are readily available in the plant kingdom. They're just not assembled in the architecture of meat. That's what a cow does. But a cow also does a lot of stuff we don't need. She grows hair, teeth, bones. She walks around; she breathes, thinks, and feels. These extra processes mean that for every 10 calories of plant-based food we feed a farmed animal, we get around 1 calorie of meat in return. Even with the nutrient animal products are most known for, protein, for every 10 grams of plant-based, we get, at most, 2 grams of animal-based. So what if we assembled these ingredients ourselves with a more efficient, ethical process? That's the approach of companies like Beyond Meat, Hungry Planet, and Impossible Foods. They've already succeeded in making a beef burger made from plants. Many consumers can't even tell the difference. Today, they're just perfecting that product and scaling up the process to lower costs and widen distribution. In fact, the Beyond Burger pictured here is already available in Mississippi. But let's be cautious. What if consumers are really picky? What if they don't just want something that tastes like animal meat, but something that is actually made from animal cells? Well, there's good news. Scientists and chefs have been working on so-called clean meat, real meat made without the food safety and ethical cost of animal slaughter. To do this, they take a small sample of cells from a living animal and place those cells in a cultivator, which looks like one of the big tanks at a beer brewery. Inside, the cells mix with the nutrients they need to grow in the same process that happens inside an animal's body, and voila! You can have your cow and eat beef too. (Laughter) But you might be thinking, "Not all beneficial technologies are widely adopted, right? So what if something goes wrong? What if the technology is fully developed, but perceived as just another food for vegetarians? Or what if an irresponsible company lets their product get contaminated, leading to a cascade of negative press that cripples the industry?" With conventional meat, we see contamination scandals all the time, but for a young industry like clean meat, it could be fatal. It's like self-driving cars, where the industry needs to be especially careful about collisions, despite having an overall better safety record. So what social change will we see on our way to an animal-free food system? The biggest one is a shift beyond the individual and towards institutional change. Like I said earlier, advocates have thus far focused heavily on one-by-one diet change, but I believe we'll see the biggest changes happen with changes to institutions like businesses, government, nonprofits and society as a whole. There's a lot of evidence that this strategy is more effective. Last year, I was at a protest, calling for a restaurant chain to reform its animal-welfare policies, just basic stuff, like choosing healthier breeds of chickens, or having windows in the chicken sheds. A pedestrian walked up and thanked me profusely for helping these poor animals. I told him he was welcome to join us, as bystanders sometimes do, and he said, "Oh no, no, no. I can't. I'm not a vegetarian." I insisted that he was welcome to join us without being vegetarian. We were just calling for better treatment for these animals. But he was unconvinced. He saw vegetarianism as a prerequisite to helping farmed animals because advocates have conflated the two for so long. If we had, instead, used an institutional framing, that bystander might have joined us and maybe become vegetarian along the way. This strategy also helps people avoid what psychologists call "the collapse of compassion," the feeling of apathy that comes when we encounter a big problem without clearly seeing the big solution. The institutional framing puts that solution, changing society as a whole, front and center in our messaging. This strategy is also well-evidenced by historical social movements, which is what I spend most of my time researching. Virtually no movements - from environmentalism, children's rights, antislavery, feminism to antiwar movements - have succeeded with the heavy, individual focus that we see in the farmed-animal movement. Consumer advocacy like boycotts have succeeded when used as tools for institutional change, but failed when treated as an end goal. We need to learn from the past. The second big change is a shift beyond opposition to factory farming alone and towards opposition to animal farming as whole. There's a lot of evidence for this strategy too. First, numerous investigations have shown that so-called humane farms are rarely humane in practice. The most picturesque farm I've ever been on was an award-winning California egg farm. But because of the farm's natural and organic policies, they didn't vaccinate the birds or give them antibiotics, like factory farms do. This led to atrocious health. I saw many cases of Marek's, a highly contagious disease that often leads to blindness and missing eyes; fluid belly, some birds with over a pound of fluid buildup inside their less than five-pound bodies; fungal infections; lice on almost all of them; and many birds crippled by eggs that had gotten stuck inside them on the way out. I've been dismayed that the reality of these farms is nearly as bad as factory farming. While reduction in suffering is something we should applaud, and it can be a step towards abolition, the unmitigated suffering is still a moral catastrophe. Second, simply the idea that there are humane ways to raise and kill animals for food is a huge roadblock, even if you just oppose factory farming. Seventy-five percent of people think they usually eat meat from animals who were treated humanely, but as we saw earlier, less than 1% of farmed animals actually live on non-factory farms. That's crazy, right? Why are consumers so confused? Well, when we eat animals, there's a cognitive dissonance that claws at us because deep down, we care about animals too. What seems to happen is that our subconscious protects us from this dissonance by creating a psychological refuge. It tells us that, actually, everything is okay, that farmed animals are treated well, even when the facts point in the opposite direction. This mistaken belief protects us from the conflict between our values and our behavior. And the misleading labels on animal products, like pictures of green pastures on cartons of factory farm eggs, exacerbate this issue. Finally, these farms are just too expensive to feed this hungry planet. So-called humane animal products are already several times the normal price. Many of us just can't afford that. And the demand on natural resources is just too much for this planet to bear, especially when we can get the same foods from more sustainable sources. Fortunately, the future is bright. Today, we're at an inflection point, where the moral reasons to change our food system are very compelling. Technology is on its way and excellent alternatives are already here, and advocates are wising up to more impactful strategies. It's incredibly empowering to have this wealth of evidence available, from history, psychology and elsewhere, to analyze using the effective altruism perspective. Ultimately, that evidence suggests that we can achieve a truly humane food system if we strive towards the end of animal farming. And public opinion is already a lot further along on this than you might think. Forty-seven percent of US adults already say they support a ban on slaughter houses. As we transition, as we align our food system with our values, we're going to see a sweeping change in the relationship between humans and the other inhabitants of this planet. Once we're no longer eating animals three times a day, we'll see a huge relief in cognitive dissonance that frees our conscience to expand our moral circle to not just farmed animals, but other populations like dogs and cats in shelters, animals used in circuses and entertainment, and the vast number of wild animals who also need our help. Today, we're laying the foundation for future social movements just as social movements of the past laid the bedrock we now stand on. Richard Branson predicted that the food system will be animal-free in just 30 years. It might take a little longer than that, but it's clear that huge change is coming. You can stand on the right side of history and play a role in this exciting movement, whether it's by starting a business like a local restaurant or a clean-meat company, becoming an activist, making a donation, or simply sharing content on social media. You can, of course, also participate as a conscious consumer, but keep in mind that your own diet choice is just one of many ways to have an impact. This is a time of unbridled excitement and opportunity, as we look ahead at one of the next great social movements. Humanity's moral circle will continue to expand, but only if people like you and me take hold. Thank you. (Applause)

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
animal farming 6
food system 6
farmed animals 6
factory farming 4
social movements 3
green pastures 2
factory farms 2
natural resources 2
effective altruism 2
animal products 2
cognitive dissonance 2
moral circle 2

Important Words

  1. abolition
  2. achieve
  3. activist
  4. adopted
  5. adults
  6. advocacy
  7. advocates
  8. afford
  9. align
  10. alternatives
  11. altruism
  12. amazing
  13. analyze
  14. animal
  15. animals
  16. antibiotics
  17. antislavery
  18. antiwar
  19. apathy
  20. applaud
  21. applause
  22. approach
  23. architecture
  24. assembled
  25. atrocious
  26. avoid
  27. bad
  28. ban
  29. basic
  30. bear
  31. bedrock
  32. beef
  33. beer
  34. behavior
  35. belief
  36. belly
  37. beneficial
  38. big
  39. biggest
  40. birds
  41. blindness
  42. body
  43. bones
  44. boycotts
  45. branson
  46. breathes
  47. breeds
  48. brewery
  49. bright
  50. buildup
  51. burger
  52. business
  53. businesses
  54. bystander
  55. bystanders
  56. california
  57. call
  58. calling
  59. calorie
  60. calories
  61. care
  62. careful
  63. cars
  64. cartons
  65. cascade
  66. cases
  67. catastrophe
  68. cats
  69. cautious
  70. cells
  71. center
  72. chain
  73. change
  74. changing
  75. charity
  76. chefs
  77. chicken
  78. chickens
  79. choice
  80. choosing
  81. circle
  82. circuses
  83. claws
  84. clean
  85. clear
  86. cognitive
  87. collapse
  88. collisions
  89. coming
  90. companies
  91. company
  92. compassion
  93. compelling
  94. conflated
  95. conflict
  96. confused
  97. conscience
  98. conscious
  99. consumer
  100. consumers
  101. contagious
  102. contaminated
  103. contamination
  104. content
  105. continue
  106. conventional
  107. cost
  108. costs
  109. cow
  110. crazy
  111. creating
  112. crippled
  113. cripples
  114. cultivator
  115. dairy
  116. day
  117. deep
  118. demand
  119. developed
  120. diet
  121. difference
  122. direction
  123. disease
  124. dismayed
  125. dissonance
  126. distribution
  127. dogs
  128. donation
  129. earlier
  130. eat
  131. eating
  132. effective
  133. efficient
  134. egg
  135. eggs
  136. empowering
  137. encounter
  138. entertainment
  139. environmentalism
  140. ethical
  141. evidence
  142. exacerbate
  143. excellent
  144. excitement
  145. exciting
  146. expand
  147. expensive
  148. extra
  149. fact
  150. factory
  151. facts
  152. failed
  153. farm
  154. farmed
  155. farming
  156. farms
  157. fat
  158. fatal
  159. feed
  160. feeling
  161. feels
  162. feminism
  163. finally
  164. find
  165. fluid
  166. focus
  167. focused
  168. food
  169. foods
  170. fortunately
  171. foundation
  172. framing
  173. frees
  174. front
  175. fully
  176. fungal
  177. future
  178. give
  179. goal
  180. good
  181. government
  182. grams
  183. great
  184. green
  185. grow
  186. growing
  187. grows
  188. hair
  189. happen
  190. health
  191. healthier
  192. heavily
  193. heavy
  194. helping
  195. helps
  196. highly
  197. historical
  198. history
  199. hold
  200. houses
  201. huge
  202. humane
  203. humanely
  204. humans
  205. hungry
  206. idea
  207. impact
  208. impactful
  209. implement
  210. impossible
  211. incredibly
  212. individual
  213. industry
  214. inflection
  215. ingredients
  216. inhabitants
  217. innovation
  218. insisted
  219. institutional
  220. institutions
  221. investigations
  222. irresponsible
  223. issue
  224. join
  225. joined
  226. kill
  227. kingdom
  228. labels
  229. laid
  230. laughter
  231. laying
  232. leading
  233. leads
  234. learn
  235. led
  236. lets
  237. lice
  238. live
  239. living
  240. local
  241. long
  242. longer
  243. lot
  244. making
  245. meat
  246. media
  247. messaging
  248. mind
  249. mindset
  250. minerals
  251. misleading
  252. missing
  253. mississippi
  254. mistaken
  255. mix
  256. moral
  257. movement
  258. movements
  259. natural
  260. negative
  261. news
  262. nonprofits
  263. normal
  264. number
  265. numerous
  266. nutrient
  267. nutrients
  268. opinion
  269. opportunity
  270. oppose
  271. opposition
  272. organic
  273. participate
  274. pastures
  275. pedestrian
  276. people
  277. perceived
  278. percent
  279. perfecting
  280. perspective
  281. picky
  282. pictured
  283. pictures
  284. picturesque
  285. place
  286. planet
  287. plant
  288. plants
  289. play
  290. point
  291. policies
  292. politics
  293. poor
  294. populations
  295. pound
  296. powerful
  297. practice
  298. predicted
  299. prerequisite
  300. press
  301. price
  302. problem
  303. problems
  304. process
  305. processes
  306. product
  307. products
  308. profusely
  309. protects
  310. protein
  311. protest
  312. psychological
  313. psychologists
  314. psychology
  315. public
  316. puts
  317. raise
  318. rarely
  319. readily
  320. real
  321. reality
  322. reasons
  323. record
  324. reduction
  325. reform
  326. refuge
  327. relationship
  328. relief
  329. research
  330. researching
  331. resources
  332. restaurant
  333. return
  334. richard
  335. rights
  336. roadblock
  337. role
  338. safety
  339. sample
  340. scaling
  341. scandals
  342. scientists
  343. sharing
  344. sheds
  345. shelters
  346. shift
  347. shown
  348. side
  349. simply
  350. slaughter
  351. small
  352. social
  353. society
  354. solution
  355. solutions
  356. sources
  357. spend
  358. stand
  359. starting
  360. step
  361. strategies
  362. strategy
  363. strive
  364. stuck
  365. stuff
  366. subconscious
  367. succeeded
  368. suffering
  369. suggests
  370. support
  371. sustainable
  372. sweeping
  373. system
  374. tackle
  375. tanks
  376. tastes
  377. technologies
  378. technology
  379. teeth
  380. tells
  381. thanked
  382. thinking
  383. thinks
  384. time
  385. times
  386. today
  387. told
  388. tool
  389. tools
  390. trace
  391. transition
  392. treated
  393. treatment
  394. ultimately
  395. unbridled
  396. unconvinced
  397. unmitigated
  398. vaccinate
  399. values
  400. vast
  401. vegetarian
  402. vegetarianism
  403. vegetarians
  404. virtually
  405. walked
  406. walks
  407. water
  408. ways
  409. wealth
  410. widely
  411. widen
  412. wild
  413. windows
  414. wising
  415. working
  416. wrong
  417. year
  418. years
  419. young