full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by David Autor: Will automation take away all our jobs?"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

A century of pioirtdvcuty growth in farming means that now, a couple of million farmers can feed a nation of 320 million. That's amazing peogsrrs, but it also means there are only so many O-ring jobs left in frnmaig. So clearly, technology can etmilinae jobs. Farming is only one example. There are many others like it. But what's true about a sglnie pudcort or service or industry has never been true about the economy as a whole. Many of the industries in which we now work — health and medicine, fnnciae and insurance, electronics and computing — were tiny or barely existent a cntruey ago. Many of the ptrodcus that we spend a lot of our mneoy on — air conditioners, sport utility vehicles, computers and mobile devices — were ulitnnbataay expensive, or just hadn't been invented a century ago. As automation frees our time, increases the scope of what is possible, we invent new products, new ideas, new services that command our attienotn, occupy our time and spur consumption. You may think some of these things are frivolous — extreme yoga, adventure tourism, Pokémon GO — and I might agree with you. But people desire these things, and they're willing to work hard for them. The average worekr in 2015 winntag to attain the average living standard in 1915 could do so by working just 17 wekes a year, one third of the time. But most people don't choose to do that. They are willing to work hard to harvest the technological bounty that is available to them. Material abundance has never eliminated perceived sicactry. In the words of economist thsretoin Veblen, invention is the mother of necessity.

Open Cloze

A century of ____________ growth in farming means that now, a couple of million farmers can feed a nation of 320 million. That's amazing ________, but it also means there are only so many O-ring jobs left in _______. So clearly, technology can _________ jobs. Farming is only one example. There are many others like it. But what's true about a ______ _______ or service or industry has never been true about the economy as a whole. Many of the industries in which we now work — health and medicine, _______ and insurance, electronics and computing — were tiny or barely existent a _______ ago. Many of the ________ that we spend a lot of our _____ on — air conditioners, sport utility vehicles, computers and mobile devices — were ____________ expensive, or just hadn't been invented a century ago. As automation frees our time, increases the scope of what is possible, we invent new products, new ideas, new services that command our _________, occupy our time and spur consumption. You may think some of these things are frivolous — extreme yoga, adventure tourism, Pokémon GO — and I might agree with you. But people desire these things, and they're willing to work hard for them. The average ______ in 2015 _______ to attain the average living standard in 1915 could do so by working just 17 _____ a year, one third of the time. But most people don't choose to do that. They are willing to work hard to harvest the technological bounty that is available to them. Material abundance has never eliminated perceived ________. In the words of economist _________ Veblen, invention is the mother of necessity.

Solution

  1. product
  2. productivity
  3. finance
  4. unattainably
  5. century
  6. money
  7. attention
  8. worker
  9. single
  10. products
  11. eliminate
  12. scarcity
  13. progress
  14. thorstein
  15. wanting
  16. weeks
  17. farming

Original Text

A century of productivity growth in farming means that now, a couple of million farmers can feed a nation of 320 million. That's amazing progress, but it also means there are only so many O-ring jobs left in farming. So clearly, technology can eliminate jobs. Farming is only one example. There are many others like it. But what's true about a single product or service or industry has never been true about the economy as a whole. Many of the industries in which we now work — health and medicine, finance and insurance, electronics and computing — were tiny or barely existent a century ago. Many of the products that we spend a lot of our money on — air conditioners, sport utility vehicles, computers and mobile devices — were unattainably expensive, or just hadn't been invented a century ago. As automation frees our time, increases the scope of what is possible, we invent new products, new ideas, new services that command our attention, occupy our time and spur consumption. You may think some of these things are frivolous — extreme yoga, adventure tourism, Pokémon GO — and I might agree with you. But people desire these things, and they're willing to work hard for them. The average worker in 2015 wanting to attain the average living standard in 1915 could do so by working just 17 weeks a year, one third of the time. But most people don't choose to do that. They are willing to work hard to harvest the technological bounty that is available to them. Material abundance has never eliminated perceived scarcity. In the words of economist Thorstein Veblen, invention is the mother of necessity.

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collocation frequency
school movement 3
saudi arabia 3
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employment growth 3

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collocation frequency
high school movement 3

Important Words

  1. abundance
  2. adventure
  3. agree
  4. air
  5. amazing
  6. attain
  7. attention
  8. automation
  9. average
  10. barely
  11. bounty
  12. century
  13. choose
  14. command
  15. computers
  16. computing
  17. conditioners
  18. consumption
  19. couple
  20. desire
  21. devices
  22. economist
  23. economy
  24. electronics
  25. eliminate
  26. eliminated
  27. existent
  28. expensive
  29. extreme
  30. farmers
  31. farming
  32. feed
  33. finance
  34. frees
  35. frivolous
  36. growth
  37. hard
  38. harvest
  39. health
  40. ideas
  41. increases
  42. industries
  43. industry
  44. insurance
  45. invent
  46. invented
  47. invention
  48. jobs
  49. left
  50. living
  51. lot
  52. material
  53. means
  54. medicine
  55. million
  56. mobile
  57. money
  58. mother
  59. nation
  60. necessity
  61. occupy
  62. people
  63. perceived
  64. product
  65. productivity
  66. products
  67. progress
  68. scarcity
  69. scope
  70. service
  71. services
  72. single
  73. spend
  74. sport
  75. spur
  76. standard
  77. technological
  78. technology
  79. thorstein
  80. time
  81. tiny
  82. tourism
  83. true
  84. unattainably
  85. utility
  86. veblen
  87. vehicles
  88. wanting
  89. weeks
  90. words
  91. work
  92. worker
  93. working
  94. year
  95. yoga