full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Jennifer Golbeck: Your social media "likes" expose more than you think

Unscramble the Blue Letters

So this is teargt, the company. I didn't just put that logo on this poor, pganernt woman's belly. You may have seen this atdencoe that was printed in Forbes magazine where Target sent a flyer to this 15-year-old girl with advertisements and cpuonos for baby bottles and diapers and cribs two wkees before she told her parents that she was pregnant. Yeah, the dad was really upset. He said, "How did Target figure out that this high sohocl girl was pregnant before she told her parents?" It truns out that they have the purchase history for hundreds of thousands of customers and they compute what they call a pregnancy sroce, which is not just whether or not a woman's pregnant, but what her due date is. And they compute that not by looking at the obvious things, like, she's buying a crib or baby ctholes, but things like, she bought more vinimats than she normally had, or she bought a handbag that's big enough to hold diapers. And by themselves, those purchases don't seem like they might reveal a lot, but it's a pattern of behavior that, when you take it in the context of thousands of other peolpe, sttras to actually reveal some insights. So that's the kind of thing that we do when we're predicting stuff about you on social media. We're looking for little patterns of behavior that, when you detect them among millions of people, lets us find out all kinds of things.

Open Cloze

So this is ______, the company. I didn't just put that logo on this poor, ________ woman's belly. You may have seen this ________ that was printed in Forbes magazine where Target sent a flyer to this 15-year-old girl with advertisements and _______ for baby bottles and diapers and cribs two _____ before she told her parents that she was pregnant. Yeah, the dad was really upset. He said, "How did Target figure out that this high ______ girl was pregnant before she told her parents?" It _____ out that they have the purchase history for hundreds of thousands of customers and they compute what they call a pregnancy _____, which is not just whether or not a woman's pregnant, but what her due date is. And they compute that not by looking at the obvious things, like, she's buying a crib or baby _______, but things like, she bought more ________ than she normally had, or she bought a handbag that's big enough to hold diapers. And by themselves, those purchases don't seem like they might reveal a lot, but it's a pattern of behavior that, when you take it in the context of thousands of other ______, ______ to actually reveal some insights. So that's the kind of thing that we do when we're predicting stuff about you on social media. We're looking for little patterns of behavior that, when you detect them among millions of people, lets us find out all kinds of things.

Solution

  1. school
  2. turns
  3. pregnant
  4. clothes
  5. score
  6. coupons
  7. starts
  8. weeks
  9. target
  10. vitamins
  11. anecdote
  12. people

Original Text

So this is Target, the company. I didn't just put that logo on this poor, pregnant woman's belly. You may have seen this anecdote that was printed in Forbes magazine where Target sent a flyer to this 15-year-old girl with advertisements and coupons for baby bottles and diapers and cribs two weeks before she told her parents that she was pregnant. Yeah, the dad was really upset. He said, "How did Target figure out that this high school girl was pregnant before she told her parents?" It turns out that they have the purchase history for hundreds of thousands of customers and they compute what they call a pregnancy score, which is not just whether or not a woman's pregnant, but what her due date is. And they compute that not by looking at the obvious things, like, she's buying a crib or baby clothes, but things like, she bought more vitamins than she normally had, or she bought a handbag that's big enough to hold diapers. And by themselves, those purchases don't seem like they might reveal a lot, but it's a pattern of behavior that, when you take it in the context of thousands of other people, starts to actually reveal some insights. So that's the kind of thing that we do when we're predicting stuff about you on social media. We're looking for little patterns of behavior that, when you detect them among millions of people, lets us find out all kinds of things.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
social media 6
curly fries 3
media companies 3
social networks 2
personal data 2
people interact 2
totally irrelevant 2
information spreads 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
social media companies 3

Important Words

  1. advertisements
  2. anecdote
  3. baby
  4. behavior
  5. belly
  6. big
  7. bottles
  8. bought
  9. buying
  10. call
  11. clothes
  12. company
  13. compute
  14. context
  15. coupons
  16. crib
  17. cribs
  18. customers
  19. dad
  20. date
  21. detect
  22. diapers
  23. due
  24. figure
  25. find
  26. flyer
  27. forbes
  28. girl
  29. handbag
  30. high
  31. history
  32. hold
  33. hundreds
  34. insights
  35. kind
  36. kinds
  37. lets
  38. logo
  39. lot
  40. magazine
  41. media
  42. millions
  43. obvious
  44. parents
  45. pattern
  46. patterns
  47. people
  48. poor
  49. predicting
  50. pregnancy
  51. pregnant
  52. printed
  53. purchase
  54. purchases
  55. put
  56. reveal
  57. school
  58. score
  59. social
  60. starts
  61. stuff
  62. target
  63. thousands
  64. told
  65. turns
  66. upset
  67. vitamins
  68. weeks
  69. yeah